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The US Electricity Transmission and Distribution Market Outlook Product Image

The US Electricity Transmission and Distribution Market Outlook

  • ID: 1529919
  • December 2010
  • Region: United States
  • 112 Pages
  • Scripp Business Insights

"The US electric transmission and distribution network is a complex composition of lines that traverse around 365,000 circuit miles to supply electricity to the nation. The majority of the existing transmission infrastructure was put in place in the 1950's and 1960's and according to the US Department of Energy, around 70% of the power transformers are over 25 years old and around 60% of the circuit-breakers are 25 years old. This is causing bottlenecks for transmission operators to efficiently supply electricity to consumers.

Scope of this research

- Comprehend the US electricity transmission and distribution market with respect to issues that are shaping up the industry.

- Achieve an understanding of government support provided to various states in the US to enhance transmission and distribution within the power market.

- Analyze activities that are driving and factors that are deterring renewable power integration into the grid.

- Explore insight into the smart grid, its functionality, the key players involved, growth drivers and challenges.

- Understand the future of the US electricity transmission and distribution market:- planned construction READ MORE >

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Disclaimer
Executive summary
Market overview
Integration of renewables
Demand response
Smart grid
Energy storage
Future outlook

Chapter 1 Market overview
Summary
Installed power generation capacity
Electricity generation
US electricity transmission and distribution
Key players
Drivers of US transmission and distribution
Growth of renewable power generation capacity
Ageing transmission infrastructure
Resistors against US transmission and distribution
Cost challenges
Siting issues

Chapter 2 Integration of renewables
Summary
Overview of renewable energy in the US
Installed capacity
Electricity generation
Renewable resources in the US
Wind power
Solar
Geothermal
Biomass
Strategies of major players in renewables integration
Building new transmission and distribution infrastructure
Installing intelligent grid systems
Challenges in renewables integration
Intermittency
Remote location of electricity generation
Absence of a nationwide renewable policy and resulting uncertainty

Chapter 3 Demand response
Summary
Overview of demand response and its programs
Demand response programs
Price-base demand response
Incentive demand response programs
Key players
Key technologies
Strategies of major players in demand response
Improving load control through demand response programs
Use of third-party aggregators to improve demand response implementation
Challenges in demand response
Low level of demand response implementation in competitive markets due to possible revenue loss
Regulatory hurdles
Non-availability of real-time data
Lack of AMI
Demand response potential

Chapter 4 Smart grid
Summary
Overview of smart grid and smart metering
Top states investing in smart grid
Major players in smart grid
Smart meter vendors
Communication network players
Meter data management (MDM) vendors
Drivers of the smart grid
Government stimulus
Growth of renewables
Resistors against the smart grid
High installation costs
Multiple standards
Grid security

Chapter 5 Energy storage
Summary
Overview of energy storage
Major technologies
Pumped storage
Compressed air energy storage
Batteries
Molten salt storage technology
Flywheel energy storage
Drivers of energy storage
Anticipated increase in renewable power
Government support
Resistors against energy storage
High installation cost

Chapter 6 Future outlook
Summary
US electricity market outlook
Transmission and distribution outlook
Glossary/abbreviations

Table of Figures

Figure 1: US installed power generation capacity by state, 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 2: US electricity generation by state, 2009 (%), 2010
Figure 3: NERC interconnections map, 2009
Figure 4: Transmission lines in the US as of 2008 above 100kV (circuit miles), 2009
Figure 5: Transmission lines in the US by state as of 2008 above 132kV (circuit miles), 2010
Figure 6: Category of electric utilities in the US, 2008
Figure 7: Renewable installed power generation capacity in the US, 2005–09 (MW), 2010
Figure 8: Renewable power generation in the US, 2004–08 (GWh), 2010
Figure 9: Wind resource map of the US, 2009
Figure 10: Wind power potential in the US, 2010
Figure 11: Solar resource map of the US, 2008
Figure 12: Top 15 states by solar power potential in the US, 2010
Figure 13: Geothermal power resources in the US, 2009
Figure 14: Biomass resources of the US, 2009
Figure 15: The Green Power Express transmission map, 2009
Figure 16: Noncoincident actual peak load 2005–09 (MW), 2010
Figure 17: Entities offering price demand response programs
Figure 18: Top 10 peak demand reductions by state in the US, 2009 (MW), 2010
Figure 19: Utility-scale smart meter deployments, plans and proposals, 2010
Figure 20: Top 10 states receiving SGIG funds ($m), 2009
Figure 21: Key smart grid players, 2010
Figure 22: Pumped storage installed capacity by state in US, 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 23: Working principle of a pumped storage system, 2010
Figure 24: Working principle of a CAES system, 2010
Figure 25: Working principle of batteries, 2010
Figure 26: Working principle of molten salt storage system, 2010
Figure 27: Working principle of a flywheel, 2010
Figure 28: Cost comparison of select energy storage technologies ($ per kW), 2010
Figure 29: Installed power generation capacity forecast, 2007–35 (GW), 2010
Figure 30: Transmission lines in the US above 100kV, 2008–18 (circuit miles), 2009

Table of Tables

Table 1: US installed power generation capacity by state, 1990–2008 (GW), 2010
Table 2: US electricity generation by state, 1990–2009 (TWh), 2010
Table 3: Transmission lines in the US as of 2008 above 100kV (circuit miles), 2009
Table 4: Transmission lines in the US by state as of 2008 above 132kV (circuit miles), 2010
Table 5: Category of electric utilities in the US, 2008
Table 6: Major investor-owned electric utilities in the US, 2010
Table 7: Renewable installed power generation capacity in the US, 2005–09 (MW), 2010
Table 8: Renewable power generation in the US, 2004–08 (GWh), 2010
Table 9: Wind power potential in the US, 2010
Table 10: Top 15 states by solar power potential in the US, 2010
Table 11: RPS for select states in the US, 2010
Table 12: Select renewables-related transmission projects Part 1, 2010
Table 13: Select renewables-related transmission projects Part 2, 2010
Table 14: Noncoincident actual peak load 2005–09 (MW), 2010
Table 15: Entities offering price demand response programs, 2009
Table 16: Potential and actual peak load reduction by demand response resources, by region, 2007 (MW), 2009
Table 17: Top 10 peak demand reductions by state in the US, 2009 (MW), 2010
Table 18: Select utilities' demand response programs, 2010
Table 19: Select contracts of utilities with third-party demand response service providers, 2010
Table 20: Peak load reduction estimate, 2009–19 (GW), 2009
Table 21: Select utilities' planned smart meter deployment, 2010
Table 22: Top 10 states receiving SGIG funds ($m), 2009
Table 23: Major utilities receiving SGIG funding Part 1, 2009
Table 24: Major utilities receiving SGIG funding Part 2, 2009
Table 25: Break-up of ARRA provisions for smart grid, 2009
Table 26: Categorical split of SGIG program fund allocation, 2009
Table 27: Cyber security projects announced by the US DoE, 2010
Table 28: Pumped storage installed capacity by state in US, 2004–08 (MW), 2010
Table 29: Stimulus grants by state, 2009
Table 30: Cost comparison of select energy storage technologies ($ per kW), 2010
Table 31: Installed power generation capacity forecast, 2007–35 (GW), 2010
Table 32: Transmission addition plans in the US above 100kV (circuit miles), 2009

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Integrating renewables- the race for smart grids

Just 10 states deliver over two-thirds of all renewable energy power generation in the United States, according to latest research form independent analyst, Business Insights.

Latest available figures show that electricity generation from renewables in the US grew at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 2% from 351,485GWh in 2004 to 381,044GWh in 2008, primarily driven by growth in Washington and California

Paul Marshall, energy analyst at Business Insights, comments: “One of the largest challenges in integrating renewable power is that of intermittency associated with renewable energy sources such as wind and solar, which affects grid stability and security.

“Whilst renewable energy delivery is led by just a handful of states, states across the US are planning to increase the transmission and distribution infrastructure in order to accommodate an anticipated increase in renewable power capacity.”

The US renewable power generation capacity reached 139,485MW at the end of 2008, representing 12.6% of the total power generation capacity in the country. The renewable power generation capacity in the US grew at a CAGR of 4.3% from 117,760MW in 2004.

“Utilities and states across the US are investing in intelligent grid systems which can provide real-time intelligence and data to effectively integrate intermittent renewable power. According to a survey conducted by Capgemini and Platts, 48% of US utilities have adopted a smart grid strategy, while 52% have one under development,” concludes Paul.

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Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown

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