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The Non-Metallurgical Bauxite and Alumina Industry Worldwide Product Image

The Non-Metallurgical Bauxite and Alumina Industry Worldwide

  • ID: 1604515
  • February 2011
  • Region: Global
  • Materials Technology Publications

'The Non-Metallurgical Bauxite and Alumina Industry Worldwide' analyses the current position and future prospects for this important industry and its end-user applications worldwide.

Over 200 pages long and featuring more than 100 tables and charts of statistical data, the report updates and extends information presented in previous editions and assesses the effects of the recent economic downturn and the recovery that is already well underway across the industry (with record sales for alumina in 2010). The report is written by Ted Dickson, an industrial minerals consultant who is an acknowledged expert in the bauxite and alumina industry.

Total production of bauxite in 2009 was 201 million tonnes, a decline of about 2% over record high levels in 2008 but still an increase of 29% since 2004 and an increase of 55% over the last decade. Total production of bauxite in 2010 is estimated to have been 215 million tonnes, with much of the growth due to strong demand in China. More than 95% of raw bauxite is for use in the production of aluminium, with the remaining amount used in non-metallurgical applications, equalling about 8.0 million tonnes in 2010 and about 7.0 million READ MORE >

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

2. INTRODUCTION

3.0 TECHNICAL ASPECTS
3.1 Bauxite and alumina production
3.1.1 Metallurgical grade bauxite & alumina production
3.1.2 Non-metallurgical bauxite production
3.1.3 Calcined bauxite production
3.1.4 Brown fused alumina production
3.1.5 White fused alumina production
3.1.6 Tabular alumina production
3.1.7 Calcined alumina production
3.1.8 Activated alumina production
3.1.8.1 Granular products
3.1.8.2 Spherical and extruded products
3.1.9 Aluminium hydroxide production
3.1.9.1 Summary of different types of Al(OH) 3 production
3.1.10 Alumina-based chemical production
3.2 Specifications

4 APPLICATIONS AND MARKETS
4.1 Metallurgical grade bauxite and alumina
4.1.1 Alumina
4.2 Non -calcined bauxite
4.2.1 Bauxite for cement
4.2.1.1 Portland cement
4.2.1.2 High alumina cement (CAC)
4.2.2 Bauxite as a slag adjuster
4.2.3 Bauxite for chemical production
4.2.4 Bauxite for mineral fibre/rockwool production
4.3 Calcined bauxite
4.3.1 Refractory bauxite
4.3.1.1 Usage in refractories
4.3.1.2 Refractory bauxite supply
4.3.1.3 Refractory bauxite producers
4.3.2 Abrasive grade bauxite
4.3.3 Welding grade bauxite
4.3.4 Proppants
4.3.5 Anti - skid surfaces
4.4 Alumina
4.4.1 Supply/demand
4.4.2 Non-metallurgical alumina supply
4.4.3 Non-metallurgical alumina suppliers
4.4.4 Specialty alumina production
4.4.4.1 Calcined alumina
4.4.4.2 ATH production and uses
4.4.4.2.1 Specialty hydrates
4.4.4.2.2 Fine precipitates
4.4.4.2.3 White ATH
4.4.4.2.4 Ground Bayer hydrate
4.4.4.3 Calcined alumina
4.4.4.3.1 Specialty calcined alumina
4.4.4.4 Tabular alumina
4.4.4.5 Ultra high purity alumina
4.4.4.5.1 Producers of high/ultra high purity alumina
4.4.5 Alumina markets
4.4.5.1 Chemicals
4.4.5.1.1 Aluminium fluoride
4.4.5.1.2 Sodium aluminate
4.4.5.1.3 Zeolites
4.4.5.2 Refractories
4.4.5.2.1 Refractories industry overview
4.4.5.2.1.1 Calcined alumina
4.4.5.2.1.2 Tabular alumina
4.4.5.2.1.3 White fused alumina
4.4.5.2.1.4 High alumina calcium aluminate cement
4.4.5.3 Ceramics
4.4.5.4 Abrasives and polishing
4.4.5.5 Activated alumina
4.4.5.5.1 Desiccants
4.4.5.5.2 Other adsorbent applications
4.4.5.5.3 Claus catalysts
4.4.5.5.4 Catalyst carriers
4.4.6 Trends in production
4.4.6.1 Bauxite
4.4.6.2 Alumina
4.4.7 Trends in pricing
4.4.7.1 Bauxite
4.4.7.2 Alumina

5. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

6. APPENDICES
6.1 General economic indicators
6.2 Trade statistics (import/export tables)
6.3 Names and addresses of companies

Ted Dickson has over 25 years experience in the industrial minerals industry. After obtaining a B.Sc degree in geology from Edinburgh University and an M.Sc in Mineral Exploration from the Royal School of Mines in London, he spent more than twelve years on the editorial staff of Industrial Minerals magazine, working at both the London and New York offices, latterly as American Editor. He then spent five years with a mining company, Cluff Resources, primarily assessing opportunities for the company to diversify into industrial minerals to supplement its gold mining activities.

For the past 13 years, Ted Dickson has been working as an independent consultant, running TAK Industrial Minerals, a consultancy that specialises in the markets for industrial minerals. While much of his work now involves dedicated consultancy reports for individual clients within the minerals sector, he continues to write various books, articles and multi- client studies on a range of industrial minerals-related subjects, including alumina and bauxite.

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