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Advanced Biological Treatment Market - UK 2010-2014 Product Image

Advanced Biological Treatment Market - UK 2010-2014

  • Published: October 2010
  • Region: United Kingdom
  • 91 pages
  • AMA Research

"Advanced Biological Treatment Market - UK 2010-14" coverS in-vessel composting and solid waste anaerobic digestion (AD).

Advanced Biological Treatment (ABT), and in particular AD, are key in the development of the UK’s waste (and renewable energy) infrastructure as government and the waste industry strive to meet EU targets for the reduction in landfilling organic waste and increasing the levels of energy fuelled from renewable sources, in particular food waste.

To meet the 2013 and 2002 Landfill Directive (& the 2020 renewable energy) targets around 100 large commercial and 1,000 on-farm AD are likely to be needed plus an unspecified number of IVC plants. Key drivers for AD will be government incentives for e.g. ‘double ROCs’, Feed-in-Tariffs, the Quality Protocol /BS PAS 100 and the upcoming Renewable Heat Incentive.

The report contains:

- Market overview – analysis of organic waste arisings in UK and in each of the 4 home nations; trends in treatment of organic waste; estimates of current and pipeline capacities for IVC, AD and MBT plants.
- Key market drivers and barriers to growth – regulations / legislation; READ MORE >

1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 BACKGROUND
1.2 METHODOLOGY
1.3 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS

2. SUMMARY

3. ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT
3.1 GDP
3.2 INFLATION & INTEREST RATES
3.3 CONSUMER SPENDING
3.4 WASTE ARISINGS
3.5 COMPREHENSIVE SPENDING REVIEW 2010

4. ORGANIC WASTE – AN OVERVIEW
4.1 INTRODUCTION
4.2. KEY MARKET DRIVERS
4.2.1 National Waste Strategies
4.2.2 Legislation and Regulations
4.3.3 Government Department & Agency Incentives
4.3.4 Voluntary Initiatives

5. BIODEGRADABLE WASTE ARISINGS
5.1 OVERVIEW
5.2 BIODEGRADABLE COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL WASTE ARISINGS
5.2.1 England C & I Biodegradable Waste Arisings
5.2.2 Scotland Biodegradable C & I Waste Arisings
5.2.3 Wales C & I Biodegradable Waste Arisings
5.2.4 Northern Ireland C & I Biodegradable Waste Arisings
5.3 BIODEGRADABLE AGRICULTURAL WASTE ARISINGS
5.4 BIODEGRADABLE MUNICIPAL WASTE (BMW) ARISINGS
5.4.1 England BMW Arisings
5.4.2 Scotland BMW Arisings
5.4.3 Wales BMW Arisings

6. OVERVIEW OF ORGANIC WASTE TREATMENT
6.1 UK COMPOSTING & BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OVERVIEW
6.2 ENGLAND & WALES COMPOSTING & BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT
6.3 SCOTLAND COMPOSTING & BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT
6.4 WALES MSW RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING
6.5 N. IRELAND MSW RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING

7. AEROBIC IN-VESSEL COMPOSTING
7.1 DEFINITION
7.2 MARKET DEVELOPMENT
7.2.1 Recent Trends
7.2.2 Market Prospects
7.3 SUPPLY
7.3.1 Systems Suppliers
7.3.2 Plant Operators

8 ANAEROBIC DIGESTION
8.1 DEFINITION
8.2. MARKET DEVELOPMENT
8.2.1 Recent Trends
8.2.2 Market Prospects
8.3 SUPPLY
8.3.1 Systems Suppliers
8.3.2 Operators

9. MECHANICAL BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT
9.1 DEFINITION
9.2 MARKET DEVELOPMENT
9.2.1 Recent Trends
9.2.2 Market Prospects
9.3. OPERATORS

APPENDICES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B
APPENDIX C

STATISTICS

CHART 1: INTEREST RATES AND INFLATION (CPI) FROM 1992-2014 13
CHART 2: PDI & SAVINGS RATIO AT CURRENT PRICES 1992-2014 14
CHART 3: UK TRENDS IN MSW ARISINGS BY TONNAGE (‘000 TONNES) UPLIFTED 2000/01 – 2008/09 15
TABLE 4: MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF LANDFILL 2010, 2013 & 2020 - TONNES 22
CHART 5: UK BIODEGRADABLE WASTE ARISINGS BY FRACTION BY TYPE OF MATERIAL 33
TABLE 6: ENGLAND C & I BIODEGRADABLE WASTE ARISINGS BY FRACTION (‘000 TONNES) 2002/03 34
TABLE 7: SCOTLAND C & I BIODEGRADABLE WASTE ARISINGS BY SECTOR BY VOLUME (‘000 TONNES) 2008 /09 35
TABLE 8: WALES C & I BIODEGRADABLE WASTE ARISINGS BY SECTOR BY VOLUME (‘000 TONNES) 35
TABLE 9: NORTHERN IRELAND C & I BIODEGRADABLE WASTE ARISINGS BY SECTOR BY VOLUME (‘000 TONNES) 36
TABLE 10: ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND AGRICULTURAL, FORESTRY & FISHING - BIODEGRADABLE WASTE ARISINGS 2008 37
CHART 11: ENGLAND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE ARISINGS BY FRACTION BY TYPE OF MATERIAL 2006/07 38
CHART 12: WALES MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE ARISINGS BY FRACTION BY TYPE OF MATERIAL 2008/09 39
TABLE 13: GREAT BRITAIN BMW LANDFILL VOLUMES – ACTUAL AGAINST ALLOWANCE UNDER THE LATS AND LAS ‘000 TONNES 2005/06 – 2008/09 41
CHART 14: VOLUME OF SOURCE SEGREGATED ORGANIC WASTE BY TYPES OF TREATMENT 2008 /09 42
CHART 15: ENGLAND & WALES TRENDS IN WASTE TREATMENT BY METHOD BY TONNAGE (‘000 TONNES) UPLIFTED 2000/01 – 2008 43
CHART 16: ENGLAND TRENDS IN MSW DISPOSAL BY METHOD BY TONNAGE (‘000 TONNES) UPLIFTED 2000/01 – 2008/09 44
CHART 17: ENGLAND BMW RECYCLING TRENDS (‘000 TONNES) BY MATERIAL 2000/01 – 2007/08 45
CHART 18: SCOTLAND TRENDS IN MSW TREATMENT & DISPOSAL BY METHOD BY TONNAGE (‘000 TONNES) UPLIFTED 2000/01 – 2008/09 46
CHART 19: WALES TRENDS IN MSW DISPOSAL BY METHOD BY TONNAGE (‘000 TONNES) UPLIFTED 2000/01 – 2008/09 47
CHART 20: N IRELAND MSW WASTE DEPOSITS BY METHOD 2008/09 48
TABLE 21: UK COMMERCIAL IVC PLANTS BY OPERATOR, REGION AND DESIGN CAPACITY OPERATIONAL AT AUTUMN 2010 52
TABLE 22: GATE FEES COMPARISON FOR FACILITIES HANDLING BIODEGRADABLE WASTE 54
TABLE 23: UK COMMERCIAL IVC PLANTS IN THE DEVELOPMENT PIPELINE AT AUTUMN 2010 55
TABLE 24: COMMERCIAL IVC SYSTEMS SUPPLIERS ACTIVE IN THE UK 57
TABLE 25: UK OPERATIONAL COMMERCIAL AD PLANTS AS AT SEPTEMBER 2010 65
TABLE 26: GATE FEES COMPARISON FOR FACILITIES HANDLING BIODEGRADABLE WASTE 67
TABLE 27: UK LARGE COMMERCIAL AND ON-FARM AD FACILITIES (> 5MWE CAPACITY) IN THE DEVELOPMENT PIPELINE AT SEPT 2010 70
TABLE 28: MBT FACILITIES - TYPICAL SIZES & COSTS 82
TABLE 29: UK MBT PLANTS OPERATING AT SEPTEMBER 2010 83
TABLE 30: UK MBT FACILITIES IN THE DEVELOPMENT PIPELINE AT SEPTEMBER 2010 84
APPENDIX A: PFI/PPP WASTE MANAGEMENT CONTRACTS SIGNED AS AT SEPT 2010 87
APPENDIX B: APPROVED WASTE PFI/PPP PROJECTS IN PROCUREMENT SEPT 2010 88
APPENDIX C: WASTE MANAGEMENT INDUSTRY - CHANGES IN COMPANY OWNERSHIP 89

Over the next 10 years, there is expected to be substantial growth in the development of the UK’s waste treatment infrastructure. Somewhere between 1,000 and 2,000 new waste treatment and recovery facilities will be required by 2020 in England alone, if the UK is to meet interim targets set by the EU Landfill Directive and the Renewable Energy Directive.

While energy recovery incinerators will account for a reasonably large element of new capacity– the focus will mainly be on treatment facilities in particular materials recovery facilities, mechanical biological treatment, advanced biological treatment (ABT -anaerobic digestion (AD) plants and in-vessel composting (IVC)) and gasification.

It is estimated the annual arisings of biodegradable waste are around 45 million tonnes, excluding exempt activities such as spreading manure. The largest fractions are food waste, paper and car and garden waste. Although government waste legislation has largely been focused on the municipal sector, the commercial and industrial sectors account for a larger proportion of organic waste arisings.

The main method for treating source segregated organic waste is windrow composting, which processes around 75% of this. Data from the Association for Organics Recycling indicates that IVC treated around 17% in 2008/09 and AD, around 2%, although this is probably an underestimate.

Both the previous Labour government and the current Coalition government both support the use of AD, in particular, as a means of both contributing towards reducing the volume of organic waste being sent to landfill and as a key source of renewable energy (biogas).

Currently, the solid waste AD sector is very small, with around 40 on-farm plants and around 12 commercial-facilities in operation at September 2010. The government’s plans are for around 100 commercial-scale plants and 1,000 on-farm facilities. Over the next 12 months, there are some £600 -800 million worth of contracts in the development pipeline.

There are several barriers that could constrain the market development of ABT; a complex and time-consuming planning system; delays in being granted access to the National Grid system; an unwillingness of banks to lend credit for plant construction; lack of understanding among the general public about the benefits of AD and IVC (’nimbyism’) and perceived inadequate FiT and RHI tariff levels. Ultimately, over the short to medium term, the key factor is the possible length and severity of the current economic downturn. Although the new Coalition government has stated that cuts to DEFRA’s budget will not affect waste infrastructure development programmes, some local authorities already have reduced their waste management budgets. However, landfill capacity will soon be saturated, and there is no option other than to modernise the UK’s waste treatment and disposal infrastructure.

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