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Encyclopedia of Human Rights in the United States, Second Edition - Product Image

Encyclopedia of Human Rights in the United States, Second Edition

  • ID: 1867001
  • May 2011
  • Region: United States
  • 750 Pages
  • Grey House Publishing Inc

This two-volume set offers easy to grasp explanations of the basic concepts and laws in the field, with emphasis on human rights in the historical, political, and legal experience of the United States. This indispensable resource surveys the legal protection of human dignity in the United States, examines the sources of human rights norms, cites key legal cases, explains the role of international governmental and non-governmental organizations, and charts global, regional, and UN human rights measures.

- New second edition offers up-to-date data on Guantanamo Detention Centre, immigrant rights, the Torture Bill and many more current event topics

- Comprehensive Introduction places the history of human rights in the United States in an international context

- Details over 300 human rights terms, ranging from asylum and cultural relativism to hate crimes and torture, with a discussion of the significance of the term, examples, and citations of appropriate documents and court decisions

- Provides expanded coverage of over 60 Primary Documents, including conventions, treaties, and protocols related to the most up-to-date international action on ethnic cleansing, freedom of expression and religion, violence against women, and much more

- New Historical Timeline

- Nine Appendices, with additional sources of information

- A comprehensive Bibliography, to expand research on this interesting topic

- Comprehensive Index

- Available in print and ebook formats

This comprehensive, timely volume is a must for large public libraries, university libraries and social science departments, along with high school libraries.

Preface

Acknowledgments

How to Use This Book

Introduction: The Concept of Human Rights

Abbreviations

Dictionary
Accountability/Accountable
Advice and Consent of the U.S. Senate
Affirmative Action
Aid Conditionality
Alien Tort Claims Act (ATCA)
American Convention on Human Rights (ACHR)
American Declaration on the Rights and Duties of Man (ADHR)
Amnesty
Anti-Semitism
Apartheid
Arbitrary Arrest/Detention
Arrest
Asylum
Atrocity
Basic Human Rights
Bearer
Bigot(ed)/Bigotry
Bill of Rights (U.S.)
Binding
Breach
Bricker Amendment
Broad-mindedness
Bureau of Human Rights, Democracy, and Labor
Capital Punishment
Charter
Civil Human Rights
Civil Liberties
Civil Rights
Civil Society
Civil War
Collateral Damage
Collective Human Rights
Collective Punishment
Command Responsibility
Commission on Human Rights
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Communication/Complaint Procedures
Complementarity of Judicial Systems
Compliance with Human Rights Norms
Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE)
Conscientious Objection
Convention
Convention against Torture, Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT)
Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)
Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD)
Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide
Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC)
Corporal Punishment
Country Reports
Country-Specific Legislation
Covenant
Crimes against Humanity (Aggression)
Crimes against Peace
Cruel Treatment or Punishment
Cultural Human Rights
Cultural Relativism
Culture of Human Rights
Culture of Impunity
Culture of Peace
Customary International Law
Death Penalty
Declaration(s)
Declaration of Independence (U.S.)
Degrading Treatment or Punishment
Demonize/Demonization
Deportation
Derogation/Derogable Human Rights
Detention
Disappearance
Discrimination
Diversity
Domestic Remedy
Double Standard/Dual Standard
Due Process of Law
Duty
Economic Human Rights
Effective Domestic Remedy
Entry into Force (EIF)
Equality/Equality before the Law
Ethnic Cleansing
Ethnic Minority
Excessive Force
Executive Agreements (EA)
Executive Orders (EO)
Exhaustion of Domestic Remedies
Expropriation
Extradition
Extrajudicial Killing
Fact Finding
Fair Trial
Federal Clause
First Generation Human Rights
Forced Disappearance
Foreign Sovereignty Immunity Act
Forum of Shame
“Four Freedoms” Roosevelt Speech
Free and Fair Elections
Freedom
Freedom of Expression
Fundamental Rights/Freedoms
General Human Rights Legislation
Geneva Conventions of 1949 (GC)
Genocide/Genocide Convention
Grave Breaches
Gross Human Rights Violation
Habeas Corpus
Hard Core Human Rights
Harkin Amendment
Hate Crime
Hate Speech
Helsinki Final Act of 1975/Helsinki Accords
High Commissioner for Human Rights
Holocaust
Human Dignity
Humanitarian Intervention
Humanitarian Law
Human Rights
Human Rights Committee
Human Rights Reports
Human Rights Violation
Illegal Alien
Immunity
Implementing Legislation
Impunity
Inalienable Rights
Incommunicado Detention
Independent and Impartial Judiciary
Indigenous People(s) or Population(s)
Indiscriminate Attack/Force
Individual Complaint
Individual Criminal Responsibility
Individual Rights
Inherent Human Rights
Inhuman Treatment or Punishment
Inhumane Treatment
Inter-Governmental Organization
Internally Displaced Person
International Bill of Rights
International Committee of the Red Cross
International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights
International Criminal Court
International Criminal Law
International Financial Institution Legislation
International Human Rights Law
Interstate Complaint
Intolerance
Involuntary Servitude
Jackson-Vanik Amendment
Law of Armed Conflict
Liberty
Liberty and Security of Person
Lieber Code
Limitation
Link/Linkage
Massacre
Methods or Means of Combat
Minority/Minority Rights
Monitor
Most Favored Nation Trading Status
Multilateral Forum
National Self-Interest
Nationalism
Natural Law
Nondiscrimination
Non-Governmental Organization
Non-Interference with Internal Affairs
Non-Refoulement
Non-Self-Executing Treaty
Norm/Normative
Nuremberg Charter and Rules
Nuremberg Principles
On-Site Investigation/Fact-Finding
Oppression
Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe
Organization of American States
Perpetrator
Persecution
Pluralism
Police Brutality
Police State
Political Asylum
Political Correctness/Politically Correct
Political Human Rights
Political Will
Preamble
Pretrial Detention
Prisoner of Conscience
Prisoner of War
Procedural Rights
Prolonged Arbitrary Detention
Proportionality
Protocol
Public International Law
Racial Discrimination
Racism/Racist
Ratification
Refugee
Regional Human Rights System or Regime
Reparations
Reports/Reporting
Reservations, Declarations, and Understandings (RDU's)
Reverse Discrimination
Rule of Law
Sanctions
Second Generation Human Rights
Segregation
Self-Determination
Self-Executing Treaty
Sign/Signatory
Slavery
Social Human Rights
Social Justice
Soft Law
Sovereignty
Sovereignty Proviso
Special Rapporteur
Standard-Setting
State
State Party
State Responsibility for Injury to Aliens
Sub-Commission on Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities
Substantive Human Rights
Summary Execution
Third Generation Human Rights
Torture
Torture Victim Protection Act of 1992
Transparence
Treaty/International Instrument
Treaty Monitoring/Supervising Body
United Nations Charter
Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Universal Jurisdiction
Universality
Unnecessary Suffering
War Crimes
War Crimes Act of 1996
Women's Human Rights
Worldview
Xenophobia

Documents
A Word of Introduction

U.S. Historical Documents
1. Declaration of Independence (U.S.)
2. U.S. Constitution, Including the Bill of Rights
3. Executive Order 13107 on the Implementation of Human Rights Treaties and Declarations, Issued by President William J. Clinton on December 10, 1998

U.N. Related Documents
1. Charter of the United Nations
2. Universal Declaration of Human Rights
3. International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR)
4. U.S. Ratification of the ICCPR, with Reservations, Declarations, and Understandings
5. First Optional Protocol to the ICCPR
6. Second Optional Protocol to the ICCPR
7. Initial Report of the United States of America to the U.N. Human Rights Committee under the ICCPR
8. Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties under Article 40 of the ICCPR: Comments (Concluding Observations) of the Human Rights Committee
9. General Comments [of the U.N. Human Rights Committee] under Article 40, para. 4 of the ICCPR, General Comment 15(27), 1986, on “The Position of Aliens under the Covenant,” 000
10. General Comments [of the U.N. Human Rights Committee] under Article 40, para. 4 of the ICCPR, General Comment 22, 1993, “Freedom of Thought, Conscience, and Religion under Article 18 of the ICCPR,” 000
11. General Comments [of the U.N. Human Rights Committee] under Article 40, para 4 of the ICCPR, General Comment 23(27), 1994, “The Rights of Minorities,” 000
12. General Comments [of the U.N. Human Rights Committee] under Article 40, para. 4 of the ICCPR, General Comment 24(14), 1994, on “Issues relating to reservations made upon ratification or accession to the Covenant or the Optional Protocols thereto, or in relation to declarations under article 41 of the Covenant,” 000
13. International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights
14. Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide
15. U.S. Reservations, Declarations, and Understandings to the Genocide Convention
16. Convention against Torture, Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment or Punishment
17. U.S. Reservations, Declarations, and Understandings to the Convention against Torture
18. U.S. Initial Report to the U.N. Committee against Torture
19. Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination
20. U.S. Reservations, Declarations, and Understandings to the Racial Discrimination Convention
21. Declaration on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious or Linguistic Minorities
22. Draft Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
23. Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women
24. Convention on the Rights of the Child
25. Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees
26. Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees
27. Declaration on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination and Intolerance Based on Religion or Belief
28. Declaration on the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups, and Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognized Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms
29. Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women
30. Body of Principles for the Protection of All Persons under Any Form of Detention or Imprisonment
31. Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners
32. Safeguards Guaranteeing Protection of the Rights of Those Facing the Death Penalty,Administration of Justice
33. Report submitted by Mr. Bacre Waly Ndiaye, Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial, Summary, or Arbitrary Executions, U.N. Commission on Human Rights, on His Mission to the U.S.A., 1997
34. Written Intervention by Human Rights Advocates, a Non-Governmental Organization, to the U.N. Commission on Human Rights, Especially Concerning the Death Penalty for Juvenile Offenders
35. ”Civil and Political Rights, Including: Freedom of Expression.” Report submitted by Abdelfattah Amor, Special Rapporteur on Religious Intolerance and Discrimination, U.N. Commission on Human Rights, on his mission to the U.S.A., 1998
36. ”Violence Against Women” Report submitted by Ms. Radhika Coomaraswamy, Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women, U.N. Commission on Human Rights, on her mission to the U.S.A on the issue of violence against women in state and federal prisons, 1999
37. Report submitted to the U.N. Commission on Human Rights by Maurice Glele-Ahanhanzo, Special Rapporteur on Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance, on his fact-finding mission to the U.S.A., 1994
38. Response of the U.S. Government to Maurice Glele-Ahanhanzo, Special Rapporteur on Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance, on his factfinding mission to the U.S.A., 1994
39. Report of the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, Decisions, and Opinions, Adopted by the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention
40. Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action
41. U.N. General Assembly Resolution proclaiming the “U.N. Decade for Human Rights Education,” 000
42. International Labour Organization Documents
43. Convention No.182 concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, with U.S. Ratification (Reservations, Declarations, and Understandings)
44. Organization of American States Documents
45. American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man
46. American Convention on Human Rights
47. First Protocol to the ACHR (“Protocol of San Salvador”)
48. Second Protocol to the ACHR
49. Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe Documents
50. Helsinki Final Act of 1975
51. Humanitarian Law and International Criminal Law Documents
52. 1907 Hague Convention IV, Regulations Respecting the Laws and Customs of War on Land
53. 1945 Nuremberg Principles
54. Basic Rules of International Humanitarian Law
55. Geneva Convention IV of 1949 Relative to Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflicts
56. 1977 Protocol I to the Geneva Conventions of 1949
57. 1977 Protocol II to the Geneva Conventions of 1949
58. Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
59. Statute of the International Criminal Court, adopted July 1998
60. Convention on Prohibition or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects. (1980; includes protocol and as amended in 1996)

Appendixes
A. Charts of the International Protection of Human Rights
1. Inter-governmental organizations
a) Universal/Global Human Rights Systems
b) Regional Human Rights Systems
c) Other Systems
2. Non-Governmental Organizations/Civil Society
B. Charts on the U.N. System for the Protection of Human Rights
1. The U.N. System
2. The United Nations Human Rights Organizational Structure
3. International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights: Procedures
4. Model ICCPR Complaint
C. Human Rights Report Card
D. List of Substantive Human Rights Found in the International Bill of Human Rights
E. How an International Human Rights Norm Becomes U.S. Law
F. Status of Human Rights in the United States
G. Selected U.S. Human Rights Legislation
H. Selected Case Decisions
I. Spectrum of Law Applicable in the United States

Bibliography

Index

About the Authors

...unique because of its U.S. emphasis and its inclusion of extensive primary source material. It is nicely organized and written at a level that makes it useful for high school and college students, as well as the general reader, and is recommended for high school, public, and academic libraries..."
- Booklist

"...invaluable for anyone interested in human rights issues ... highly recommended for all reference collections."
- American Reference Books Annual

"...a conceptually thorough and well-organized reference. The definitions are relevant with valuable commentary and are linked to source documents and other related entries ... Both academic and public libraries should consider this important and timely reference for their collections."
- Against the Grain

“ This two-volume reference will provide invaluable for anyone interested in human rights issues… With the cross-references to terms, documents, and appendixes, the reader will understand the work more fully and specifically. This work is highly recommended for all reference collections.”
Previously Published by ABC Clio
- ARBA

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