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Oil and Gas Exploration in the Arctic - Vast, Technically Recoverable Oil and Gas Resources Attract International Oil Companies to Increase Presence in the Region - Product Image

Oil and Gas Exploration in the Arctic - Vast, Technically Recoverable Oil and Gas Resources Attract International Oil Companies to Increase Presence in the Region

  • Published: November 2012
  • Region: Global
  • 48 pages
  • GlobalData

Oil and Gas Exploration in the Arctic - Vast, Technically Recoverable Oil and Gas Resources Attract International Oil Companies to Increase Presence in the Region

Summary

"Oil and Gas Exploration in the Arctic - Vast, Technically Recoverable Oil and Gas Resources Attract International Oil Companies to Increase Presence in the Region" is the latest report from GlobalData, the industry analysis specialist. The report highlights the oil and gas exploration potential of the Arctic region, providing details of key exploration areas, major companies exploring the Arctic and the drivers and challenges of oil and gas exploration in the Arctic region. The report discusses leasing and exploration activities in the US (Alaska), Greenland, Canada, Norway and Russia, detailing exploration and production operations of major international oil companies involved and key drivers and challenges for development in the environmentally sensitive region.

Scope

The report analyzes oil and gas exploration activities in the Arctic region. The scope of the report includes -
- The report provides an overview of the oil and gas resources in the Arctic.
- The report discusses the READ MORE >

1
1

1.1 List of Tables
1.2 List of Figures
2 Introduction
2.1 Overview
2.2 GlobalData Report Guidance
3 Arctic Region Holds Vast Technically Recoverable Oil and Gas Resources
3.1 The Arctic Region Holds Substantial Undiscovered Oil and Natural Gas Resources
3.2 Major Sedimentary Basins in the Arctic Region
3.3 Oil and gas Exploration in the Arctic: Key Drivers and Challenges
3.3.1 Substantial Oil and Gas Reserves and Advanced Offshore Drilling Technologies to Enable International Oil Companies to Increase Exploration Activities in Arctic Region
3.3.2 Shrinking Ice Cover in the Arctic to Lead to Increased Exploration and Drilling Activities
3.3.3 Russian Government’s New Tax Approach to Strengthen Incentives for Offshore Operations
3.3.4 Environmental Issues May Hamper Exploration Activities
3.3.5 Opposition from Environmental Groups Regarding Exploration in Arctic Region
3.3.6 Harsh Climatic Conditions in the Arctic Affect Infrastructure Development Activities
3.3.7 Territorial Disputes Affect Oil and Gas Development in Arctic
4 Rosneft Forges Alliances With International Companies to Explore Arctic Assets
4.1 Exploration Activities in the Arctic Region
4.1.1 Exploration Activities in the Kara Sea Blocks
4.1.2 Exploration Activities in the Pechora Sea
4.2 Rosneft Co-operates with IOCs to Explore and Develop Arctic Resources and Venture into Other International Projects Operated by IOCs
4.2.1 Rosneft and ExxonMobil Co-operate on Exploration and Production Activities in Kara Sea and Western Siberian Basin
4.2.2 Rosneft and Statoil
4.2.3 Rosneft and ENI
5 ExxonMobil has Strong Presence in the US, Canada, Greenland and Russian Arctic
5.1 Exploration Activities in the Arctic Region
5.1.1 Exploration in Alaska Arctic
5.1.2 Exploration in Canadian Arctic
5.1.3 Exploration in Offshore Russia
5.1.4 Exploration in Greenland: Orsivik and Puilasoq
5.2 Exxon and Rosneft Sign Agreement to Explore Arctic oil in Kara Sea
6 Statoil Takes Strategic Approach to Broadening its Presence in the Arctic
6.1 Exploration Activities in the Arctic Region
6.1.1 Exploration in Canadian Arctic
6.1.2 Exploration in Greenland
6.1.3 Exploration in North American Arctic (Alaska)
6.1.4 Exploration in Russian Arctic
6.2 Major Discoveries in the Arctic
6.2.1 Mizzen
6.2.2 Havis
6.2.3 Skrugard
6.3 Statoil Forms Joint Venture with Rosneft to Carry Out Exploration Activities in Barents Sea and Okhotsk Sea
6.4 Statoil Forges Partnership with Gazprom to Develop Shtokman Field
7 Cairn Energy Focuses on Greenland Arctic Region
7.1 Exploration Activities in the Arctic Region
7.1.1 Exploration in Greenland
7.2 Cairn Energy Sell Equity Stakes of Greenland Licenses to Statoil
8 Royal Dutch Shell Among the Leading Companies Focusing on Exploration in the Arctic Region
8.1 Exploration Activities in the Arctic Region
8.1.1 Exploration in Alaska
8.1.2 Exploration in Canadian Arctic
8.1.3 Exploration in Russian Arctic
8.1.4 Exploration in Greenland
8.2 Gazprom and Royal Dutch Shell Co-operate in the Development of Sakhalin Project
9 BP Plc has Strong Presence in the US and Russian Arctic Regions
9.1 Exploration Activities in the Arctic Region
9.1.1 Exploration and Production in Alaskan Arctic
9.1.2 Exploration in Russian Arctic
10 Appendix
10.1 Abbreviations
10.2 Market Definitions
10.3 Sources
10.4 Methodology
10.4.1 Coverage
10.4.2 Secondary Research
10.4.3 Primary Research
10.4.4 Expert Panel Validation
10.5 Contact Us
10.6 Disclaimer

1.1 List of Tables
Table 1: The Arctic Region, Conventional Oil and Natural Gas Resources (Mean Estimated Undiscovered Technically Recoverable) By Province, 2012
Table 2: The Arctic, BP Plc, Alaska Operations, Prudhoe Bay Satellite Fields, 2012

1.2 List of Figures
Figure 1: The Arctic Region, Location Map, 2012
Figure 2: The Arctic Sea, Probability of the Presence of at Least One Undiscovered Oil And/or Gas Field with Recoverable Resources Greater than 50 MMboe
Figure 3: The Arctic Sea, Distribution of Undiscovered Oil and Natural Gas Resources, 2012
Figure 4: The Arctic Sea, Undiscovered Gas, 2012
Figure 5: The Arctic Sea, Undiscovered Oil, 2012
Figure 6: The Arctic Sea, Major Sedimentary Basins, Location Map, 2012
Figure 7: The Arctic, Exclusive Economic Zone, 2012
Figure 8: The Arctic Region, Russia, Exploration Blocks with Rosneft, 2012
Figure 9: The Arctic Sea, Russia, Western Siberia Basin, Location Map, 2012
Figure 10: The Arctic Region, ExxonMobil Operations, 2012
Figure 11: The Arctic Region, Sakhalin-1 Project, 2012
Figure 12: The Arctic Region, Assets of Statoil, 2012
Figure 13: The Arctic Region, Statoil, Canadian Arctic Operations, 2012
Figure 14: The Arctic Region, Statoil, Leases in the Alaskan Arctic, 2012
Figure 15: The Arctic Region, Statoil, Skrugard Discovery Location Map, 2012
Figure 16: The Arctic Sea, Statoil, Shtokman Project, 2012
Figure 17: The Arctic Region, Cairn Energy, Arctic Operations, 2012
Figure 18: The Arctic Region, Cairn Energy, Exploration Blocks, 2012
Figure 19: The Arctic Region, Royal Dutch Shell, Arctic Operations, 2012
Figure 20: The Arctic Region, Royal Dutch Shell, Sakhalin II Project, 2012
Figure 21: The Arctic Region, Royal Dutch Shell, Ormen Lange Oil and Gas Production, 2012
Figure 22: The Arctic Region, Royal Dutch Shell, Ormen Lange Gas Filed and Langeled Pipeline, 2012
Figure 23: The Arctic Region, BP Plc, Assets in Alaska, 2012
Figure 24: The Arctic, BP Plc, Alaska Operations, Prudhoe Bay, 2012
Figure 25: The Arctic Region, BP Plc, Russian Arctic, 2012

Crisis or Opportunity? Melting Arctic Ice Caps Opens the Freezer Door for Big Oil

Although the corrosion of polar sea ice is considered by many to be the foremost indicator of environmental damage, it may also represent the opening the world’s major oil firms have been waiting for, says business intelligence provider The authors in a new report.

As the firm’s latest publication* explores, global warming has resulted in a dramatic decrease in Arctic ice cover, revealing highly prized drilling locations in a region estimated to hold nearly 22% of the world’s undiscovered oil and gas resources.

The report continues to highlight the area’s enormous hydrocarbon wealth, including 90 billion barrels (bbls) of oil, 1,669 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of natural gas, and 44 billion bbls of Natural Gas Liquids (NGLs).

Several Arctic nations such as Russia, Canada and Denmark are staking their claim regarding the extended continental shelf and several National Oil Companies (NOCs) have undertaken exploration expeditions in the recently exposed region in preparation for what they expect to be highly fruitful oil and gas production activities.

However, the prospect of further exploiting an area that has already been reshaped in part, both directly and indirectly, by the pursuits of Big Oil will most likely be a concern of environmentalists.

Other than the well-known and environmentally detrimental effects of burning fossil fuels, upstream activities also contribute to the corrosion of sea ice through the release of black carbon emitted from transport ships.

Despite these concerns, major oil companies across Russia, Canada and beyond have been tooling up and forming mutually beneficial partnerships, with the aim of capitalizing on what appears to be highly attractive prospect.

* Oil and Gas Exploration in the Arctic - Vast, Technically Recoverable Oil and Gas Resources Attract International Oil Companies to Increase Presence in the Region

This report highlights the oil and gas exploration potential of the Arctic region, providing details of the key exploration areas, major companies exploring the Arctic and the drivers and challenges of oil and gas exploration in the Arctic.

This report was built using data and information sourced from proprietary databases, primary and secondary research, and in-house analysis conducted by The authors’s team of industry experts.

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