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Thin Film Photovoltaics 2012-2022: Forecasts, Technologies, Analysis Product Image

Thin Film Photovoltaics 2012-2022: Forecasts, Technologies, Analysis

  • Published: March 2013
  • Region: Global
  • 277 Pages
  • IDTechEx

This report focuses on the developments in thin film solar cells and batteries and how these technologies are evolving. By relating to the reader information on market conditions, competing technologies and how different economic factors affect addressable markets, the report explains growth trends and forecasts thin film technology penetration in the next decade.

CdTe, CIGS, a-Si, organic PV and DSSCs are all covered in the report along with varying chemistries for thin film batteries and appendices on the topics of manufacturing techniques and organic solar cell material and chemistry considerations.

The PV market has been rising rapidly in the past few years. A combination of government subsidies leading to high demand and falling prices due to competitive pressures from Asian markets has resulted in an unprecedented increase in the installed PV capacity worldwide, reaching 22 GW in 2011.

Today there is a range of different thin film PV and battery technologies each with a different set of characteristics. This development opens up new markets to PV and batteries which have not been addressable using traditional technologies. At the same time it suggests that READ MORE >

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1.1. Photovoltaics beyond crystalline silicon
1.2. 2008-2011 recap- Forecasts to 2022
1.3. Photovoltaics - the Macroeconomic View

2. INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE
2.1. Thin Film Photovoltaic Forecasts
2.2. Battery Forecasts

3. BATTERIES
3.1. Introduction
3.2. History
3.3. Structure
3.4. Key Products in Printed Batteries Industry
3.5. Principles and Operation
3.6. Supercapacitors supplement or rival batteries?
3.7. Thin Film Batteries - key companies
3.7.1. Blue Spark Technologies Inc.
3.7.2. Cymbet Corporation
3.7.3. Enfucell
3.7.4. Excellatron
3.7.5. Infinite Power Solutions (IPS)
3.7.6. Nanotecture
3.7.7. Power Paper
3.7.8. Solicore

4. PHOTOVOLTAICS
4.1. Introduction
4.2. History

5. COMPANY PROFILES BY TECHNOLOGY
5.1. Principles and operations
5.2. Amorphous/nanoparticle Si
5.2.1. Introduction-Brief Description of technology
5.3. Amorphous /nanoparticle Si - Key Companies
5.3.1. Flexcell
5.3.2. Fuji Electric Systems Co., Ltd.
5.3.3. Innovalight
5.3.4. Kaneka
5.3.5. Mitsubishi Heavy industries
5.3.6. Sharp
5.3.7. SONTOR GmbH
5.3.8. United Solar Ovonic
5.4. CdTe
5.4.1. Introduction-Brief Description of technology
5.5. CdTe Key Companies
5.5.1. Abound Solar
5.5.2. Calyxo
5.5.3. First Solar
5.5.4. PrimeStar Solar (now part of GE)
5.6. CIGS - CIS
5.6.1. Introduction - Brief Description of technology
5.7. CIGS - Key Companies
5.7.1. Ascent Solar Technologies, Inc.
5.7.2. Avancis
5.7.3. Bosch Solar CISTech (previously Johanna Solar)
5.7.4. DayStar Technologies
5.7.5. Global Solar Energy
5.7.6. HelioVolt
5.7.7. Honda Soltec Co., Ltd.
5.7.8. IBM
5.7.9. Miasolé
5.7.10. Nanosolar
5.7.11. Odersun
5.7.12. Solar Frontier (previously Showa Shell Sekiyu)
5.7.13. Solibro
5.7.14. Solyndra
5.7.15. Soltecture (previously Sulfurcell)
5.7.16. Würth Solar
5.8. DSSC
5.8.1. Introduction-Brief Description of technology
5.9. DSSC - Key Companies
5.9.1. Dyesol
5.9.2. G24 Innovations
5.10. Organic Photovoltaics
5.10.1. Introduction - Brief Description of technology
5.11. Organic Photovoltaics - Key Companies
5.11.1. Heliatek
5.11.2. Konarka
5.11.3. New Energy technologies
5.11.4. Solarmer
5.12. Research Institutes/Universities involved with thin film photovoltaic technologies
5.12.1. AIST - National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
5.12.2. Arizona State University
5.12.3. Colorado State University
5.12.4. École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
5.12.5. Florida Solar Energy Centre
5.12.6. Fraunhofer ISE
5.12.7. Helsinki University of technology (TKK)
5.12.8. IMEC
5.12.9. Imperial College London
5.12.10. Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
5.12.11. KAIST - Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
5.12.12. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
5.12.13. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
5.12.14. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)
5.12.15. University of Delaware - Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC)

6. APPLICATIONS
6.1. Applications of printed batteries
6.2. Batteries
6.2.1. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)
6.2.2. Smart Cards
6.2.3. Iontophoretic Devices
6.2.4. Other Devices
6.3. Photovoltaics
6.3.1. Building integrated solar electric power
6.3.2. Solar Chargers
6.3.3. Military applications
6.3.4. Other applications

7. FUTURE TRENDS AND FORECASTS FOR PRINTING TECHNOLOGIES

APPENDIX 1: PRINCIPLES AND OPERATION OF DSSCS AND ORGANIC SOLAR CELLS

APPENDIX 2: MATERIALS

APPENDIX 3: PRINTING/PATTERNING TECHNIQUES

APPENDIX 4: IDTECHEX PUBLICATIONS AND CONSULTANCY

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