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Interface Engineering of Natural Fibre Composites for Maximum Performance. Woodhead Publishing Series in Composites Science and Engineering

  • ID: 2719714
  • February 2011
  • 428 Pages
  • Elsevier Science and Technology
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One of the major reasons for composite failure is a breakdown of the bond between the reinforcement fibres and the matrix. When this happens, the composite loses strength and fails. By engineering the interface between the natural fibres and the matrix, the properties of the composite can be manipulated to give maximum performance. Interface engineering of natural fibre composites for maximum performance looks at natural (sustainable) fibre composites and the growing trend towards their use as reinforcements in composites.

Part one focuses on processing and surface treatments to engineer the interface in natural fibre composites and looks in detail at modifying cellulose fibre surfaces in the manufacture of natural fibre composites, interface tuning through matrix modification and preparation of cellulose nanocomposites. It also looks at the characterisation of fibre surface treatments by infrared and raman spectroscopy and the effects of processing and surface treatment on the interfacial adhesion and mechanical properties of natural fibre composites. Testing interfacial properties in natural fibre composites is the topic of part two which discusses the electrochemical characterisation READ MORE >

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Part I: Processing and surface treatments to compose the interface in natural fibre composites

Chapter 1: Modifying cellulose fiber surfaces in the manufacture of natural fiber composites

Abstract:

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Physical treatments

1.3 Chemical grafting

1.4 Conclusions

Chapter 2: Interface engineering through matrix modification in natural fibre composites

Abstract:

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Motivation behind using natural fibre composites and trends

2.3 Challenges in using natural fibre composites: the problem of low adhesion

2.4 Matrix modification, coupling mechanism and efficiency of bonding

2.5 Effect of matrix modification on interfacial properties

2.6 Effect of matrix modification on macroscopic properties

2.7 Future trends

2.8 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 3: Preparation of cellulose nanocomposites

Abstract:

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Hierarchical structure of natural fibers

3.3 From micro- to nanoscale

3.4 Preparation of cellulose nanocrystals

3.5 Processing of cellulose nanocomposites

3.6 Properties of cellulose nanocomposites

3.7 Conclusions and future trends

Chapter 4: Characterization of fiber surface treatments in natural fiber composites by infrared and Raman spectroscopy

Abstract:

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Methods and techniques

4.3 Analysis of natural fibers and surface treatments

4.4 Chemical treatments

4.5 Interfaces in polymer composites

4.6 Summary

Chapter 5: Testing the effect of processing and surface treatment on the interfacial adhesion of single fibres in natural fibre composites

Abstract:

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Methods for characterization of single-fibre-polymer matrix interfacial adhesion

5.3 Review of lignocellulosic polymer fibre-matrix interfacial adhesion data

5.4 Conclusions

Chapter 6: Assessing fibre surface treatment to improve the mechanical properties of natural fibre composites

Abstract:

6.1 Mechanical testing of fibres

6.2 Statistical treatment of single-fibre strength

6.3 Mechanical properties of untreated single fibres

6.4 Influence of fibre treatment on mechanical properties of natural fibres

6.5 Conclusion

6.6 Acknowledgements

Part II: Testing interfacial properties in natural fibre composites

Chapter 7: Electrokinetic characterisation of interfacial properties of natural fibres

Abstract:

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Streaming potential measurements

7.3 Electrokinetic properties of natural fibres

7.4 Conclusion

Chapter 8: Mechanical assessment of natural fiber composites

Abstract:

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Materials and experimental procedures

8.3 Mechanical testing

8.4 Conclusions

Chapter 9: Thermomechanical and spectroscopic characterization of natural fibre composites

Abstract:

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Natural fibre composites

9.3 Interfaces in natural fibre composites and their characterization

9.4 Microscopic techniques

9.5 Spectroscopic techniques

9.6 Thermomechanical methods

9.7 Conclusions

Chapter 10: Assessing the moisture uptake behavior of natural fibres

Abstract:

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Methods of quantifying moisture uptake of natural fibres

10.3 Moisture uptake behaviour of various natural fibres

10.4 Summary

10.5 Acknowledgements

Chapter 11: Creep and fatigue of natural fibre composites

Abstract:

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Fundamentals of the creep test

11.3 Life prediction of natural fibre composites using long-term creep analysis

11.4 Creep modelling

11.5 Nonlinear viscoelastic response

11.6 Stress relaxation

11.7 Fatigue

11.8 Factors affecting the fatigue life of natural fibre composites

11.9 Wood-based composites

11.10 Conclusions

11.11 Acknowledgements

11.12 Notation

Chapter 12: Impact behavior of natural fiber composite laminates

Abstract:

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Phenomenon description

12.3 Testing methods and instruments

12.4 Interpretation of the experimental data

12.5 Nondestructive inspection (NDI) ultrasonic techniques

12.6 Acknowledgements

Chapter 13: Raman spectroscopy and x-ray scattering for assessing the interface in natural fibre composites

Abstract:

13.1 Introduction to Raman spectroscopy

13.2 Raman spectroscopy and measurements of molecular deformation in polymer fibres

13.3 X-ray diffraction and stress analysis in fibres and composites

13.4 Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements of molecular and crystal deformation in cellulose fibres

13.5 Discussion

13.6 Conclusions

Index

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Zafeiropoulos, Nikolaos E
Dr. Nikolaos E. Zafeiropoulos is Assistant Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Ioannina in Greece. He is widely regarded for his research expertise on interfaces in composite materials, the development of novel nanohybrid materials and composite hybrid colloids, and the application of x-ray scattering on polymers.

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