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Electric Aircraft 2013-2023: Trends, Projects, Forecasts Product Image

Electric Aircraft 2013-2023: Trends, Projects, Forecasts

  • Published: February 2014
  • Region: Global
  • 270 Pages
  • IDTechEx

Electric aircraft serve the need for reduced noise, air and ground pollution and reduced global warming. They provide freedom from foreign sources of oil. They make new things possible such as helicopters that can carry out a controlled landing after engineering failures thanks to electric backup and leisure aircraft getting all their "fuel" from solar cells on the hanger. They expand the market for aircraft, while modernising the industry and opening up applications for many new electrical components and systems, including structural components, printed electronics and smart skin.

Electrically driven aircraft are arriving from the bottom up in the form of hang gliders and sailplanes and from the top down in the form of large hybrid helicopters and airliners that have electric nosewheels making them electric vehicles when on the ground. Near-silent take-off and landing of feeder aircraft is being considered and small aircraft that get airborne thanks to wheel motors and the personal aircraft in your garden will be possible. The technologies are changing radically with supercapacitors potentially replacing or partly replacing batteries, plus new power components, motors, a wide READ MORE >

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
1.1. Introduction to electric aircraft
1.1.1. Examples of commercially available light aircraft and hang gliders
1.2. All EV components will radically change
1.2.1. Traction motors
1.2.2. Power circuitry
1.2.3. Range extenders
1.2.4. Fuel cells are also range extenders
1.2.5. Energy harvesting, wingtip vortex turbines
1.2.6. Traction batteries
1.2.7. Supercapacitors
1.2.8. Energy storage comparisons
1.2.9. Parts merge, structured components, smart skin
1.2.10. Electric helicopters enabled
1.2.11. Europe often in the lead
1.3. Need for more benchmarking
1.4. Market projections 2013-2023
1.5. Progress in 2013
1.6. US success in 2013
1.7. 7th Annual CAFE Electric Aircraft Symposium: Day 1
1.7.1. VTOL, hybrids and energy harvesting come center stage
1.7.2. Carbon fiber gets easier
1.7.3. Lithium-ion batteries need care
1.7.4. Disquiet about the Boeing Dreamliner
1.7.5. Way out energy sources
1.7.6. Graphene
1.7.7. Thin film photovoltaic but not yet
1.8. 7th Annual CAFE Electric Aircraft Symposium: Day 2
1.9. Latest view from Europe

2. INTRODUCTION
2.1. Definitions and scope
2.2. Needs
2.3. Encouragement
2.4. Impediments
2.5. Benchmarking best practice with land and seagoing EVs
2.6. Standards and rules
2.7. Airport EVs show the way

3. TECHNOLOGIES
3.1. Powertrains
3.1.1. Pure electric vs hybrid
3.1.2. Convergence
3.1.3. Options
3.1.4. Range extenders
3.1.5. Airliner superconducting motor with range extender
3.2. Electric traction motors
3.2.1. Traction motors for land, water and air vehicles
3.3. Shape of motors
3.4. Location of motors
3.5. Traction motor technology preference
3.5.1. A look at all types of electric vehicle
3.5.2. Lesson for electric aircraft traction motors
3.6. Blunt motor talk at EV Japan
3.7. Switched reluctance motors a disruptive traction motor technology?
3.8. Three ways that traction motor makers race to escape rare earths
3.8.1. Synchronous motors with no magnets - switched reluctance
3.8.2. Synchronous motors with new magnets
3.8.3. Asynchronous motors
3.8.4. More to come
3.9. Implications for electric aircraft
3.10. Batteries
3.10.1. Battery history
3.10.2. Analogy to a container of liquid
3.10.3. Construction of a battery
3.10.4. Many shapes of battery
3.10.5. Trend to laminar and conformal traction batteries
3.10.6. Aurora laminar batteries in aircraft.
3.10.7. Choices of chemistry and assembly
3.10.8. Lithium winners today and soon
3.10.9. Lithium polymer electrolyte now important
3.10.10. Winning chemistry
3.10.11. Winning lithium traction battery manufacturers
3.10.12. Making lithium batteries safe
3.10.13. Boeing Dreamliner: Implications for electric aircraft
3.11. Fuel cells
3.11.1. Slow progress with fuel cells
3.11.2. Aerospace and aviation applications
3.11.3. AeroVironment USA
3.11.4. Boeing Europe
3.11.5. Boeing and Airbus USA, Europe
3.11.6. ENFICA Italy and UK
3.11.7. Pipistrel Slovenia
3.11.8. University of Stuttgart Germany
3.12. Supercapacitors, supercabatteries
3.12.1. What is a capacitor?
3.12.2. Why supercapacitors increasingly replace batteries
3.12.3. Supercabattery
3.12.4. Extreme Capacitors
3.13. Energy harvesting
3.13.1. Photovoltaics
3.13.2. Green Pioneer China
3.13.3. Gossamer Penguin USA
3.13.4. Néphélios France
3.13.5. Solair Germany
3.13.6. Sunseeker USA
3.13.7. University of Applied Sciences Schwäbisch Gmünd Germany
3.14. Other energy harvesting
3.14.1. Regenerative soaring
3.14.2. Wingtip vortex turbines
3.15. Hybrid powertrains in action
3.15.1. Multifuel and monoblock engines
3.15.2. Beyond Aviation: formerly Bye Energy USA, France
3.15.3. Flight Design Germany
3.15.4. Lotus UK
3.15.5. Microturbines - Bladon Jets, Capstone, ETV Motors, Atria
3.16. Hybrid aircraft projects
3.16.1. Delta Airlines USA
3.16.2. DLR Germany
3.16.3. EADS Germany
3.16.4. Flight Design Germany
3.16.5. GSE USA
3.16.6. Hybrid aircraft university work
3.16.7. Ricardo UK
3.16.8. Turtle Airships Spain
3.16.9. University of Colorado USA
3.17. Rethinking the structural design

4. ELECTRIC HELICOPTERS/VTOL
4.1. Pure electric helicopters
4.1.1. Hirobo
4.1.2. Pascal Chretien/ SYNPER 3/ Solution F France
4.1.3. Sikorsky USA
4.2. Volocopter
4.2.1. e-volo Volocopter Germany
4.3. Hybrid helicopters
4.3.1. Examples of activity
4.3.2. Eurocopter helicopter default EV Europe
4.3.3. MyCopter Europe
4.3.4. Terrafugia flying cars USA
4.4. Design analysis

5. ELECTRIC AMPHIBIAN AIRCRAFT AND FLYING BOATS
5.1. Guenther Poeschel Denmark
5.2. Equator Aircraft Norway
5.3. FlyNano Finland

6. STUDIES OF LONG DISTANCE ELECTRIC AIRCRAFT
6.1. Light aircraft - University of Texas at Arlington USA
6.2. Potential for electric airliners

7. ELECTRIC AIRCRAFT IN ACTION
7.1. Airliner electric nose wheel for taxiing
7.1.1. APU powered electric nose wheel
7.1.2. Honeywell Safran EGTS
7.1.3. Israel Aircraft Industries' TaxiBot
7.1.4. Fuel cell powered electric nose wheel
7.2. Fixed wing light aircraft
7.2.1. Alatus Ukraine
7.2.2. Alisport Silent Club Italy
7.2.3. Alternair USA
7.2.4. APAME France
7.2.5. Cessna USA
7.2.6. Diamond Aircraft, Siemens, EADS
7.2.7. EADS Germany, France
7.2.8. Electravia France
7.2.9. Electric Aircraft Corporation USA
7.2.10. Electroflight UK
7.2.11. Falx USA
7.2.12. Flight of the Century
7.2.13. Flightstar USA
7.2.14. Flying motorcycle Samson Motorworks
7.2.15. Lange Aviation Germany
7.2.16. Pipistrel Slovenia
7.2.17. Phantom Works USA plane-car
7.2.18. Renault France
7.2.19. Russian Government Russia
7.2.20. SkySpark Italy
7.2.21. Sonex USA
7.2.22. Sunrise USA
7.2.23. Tokyo University Japan
7.2.24. Windward Performance USA
7.2.25. University of Cambridge UK
7.2.26. Yuneec International China

8. FIFTEEN YEAR TIMELINE AND MARKET NUMBERS
8.1. Forecast sales 2013-2023
8.2. Energy efficient aircraft - the next 15 years

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