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Smart Mirrors Technologies and Markets, 2015-2022

  • ID: 3166592
  • April 2015
  • Region: Global
  • n-tech Research
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This report updates the evaluation of the various types of technologies that companies are using to make mirrors "smart," while noting how different sectors may have different value propositions. It also explores the various market drivers for "smart mirrors" the four key end-market sectors: automotive, home/consumer, retail/commercial, and medical/healthcare. The report provides eight-year forecasts for the various "smart" technologies in each sector, both in volumes and in value terms.

This report is designed to provide guidance for marketing, business, and technology executives from not only the traditional "mirror" sector (i.e. glass and coatings), but also from the various electronics sectors providing these "smart" functionalities, particularly displays, touch sensors, and consumer electronics. this report will be valuable to evaluators in these end-markets as they evaluate how such "smart mirrors" are evolving to meet their unique application requirements.

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Executive Summary
E.1 What's Changed with Smart Mirrors
E.2 Technology Update: Approaching a Crossroads
E.2.1 How Smart is a Coating?
E.2.2 Electronics Are Essential
E.2.3 Mirror Images: Playing the Semantics Game
E.3 Application Update: Putting Smarts to Work
E.3.1 Automotive: Shifting Gears, Changing Lanes
E.3.2 Retail: Big Names Moving In
E.3.3 Home and Consumer: Hidden Value?
E.3.4 Healthcare: Still Awaiting Diagnosis
E.4 Key Companies in Smart Mirrors
E.5 Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecasts for Smart Mirrors

Chapter One: Introduction
1.1 Background to this Report
1.1.1 Making Mirrors Smart: First Coatings, Now Electronics
1.1.2 Growth in End Markets: Testing Time
1.1.3 What's Next for Smart Mirrors: Time to Redefine?
1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
1.3 Methodology of this Report
1.3.1 Forecasting Methodology and Assumptions
1.4 Plan of this Report

Chapter Two: Smart Mirror Technologies, Improvements and Updates
2.1 What Makes a Mirror Smart?
2.1.1 "Smart" Glass: Momentum for Mirrors?
2.2 Self-Dimming Mirrors
2.2.1 Electrochromic Technology
2.2.2 Other Self-Dimming Technology for Smart Mirrors
2.3 Self-Cleaning Mirrors
2.4 Self-Repairing Mirrors
2.5 Embedded Electronic Devices in Smart Mirrors
2.5.1 Sensors
2.5.2 Displays
2.5.3 Cameras
2.5.4 Touch Sensors
2.6 Key Points in this Chapter

Chapter Three: Smart Mirrors in Automotive Markets
3.1 The Evolution of Vehicle Mirrors
3.1.1 Safety Above All
3.1.2 Self-Dimming and EC: A Smart Mirror Success
3.2 The Road Ahead: Multiple Functions
3.3 Market Dominance: Gentex vs. the Field
3.4 Smart Mirrors' Biggest Threats in Automotive
3.4.1 Market Maturity: Where's the Growth?
3.4.2 Cameras and Mandates: The Evolution of Vision
3.4.3 Two Big Years: Fighting for Smart Auto Mirrors' Future
3.5 Eight-Rear Forecasts for Smart Mirrors in Automotive Applications
3.6 Key Points from this Chapter

Chapter Four: Smart Mirrors in Retail and Advertising
4.1 What's Driving Smart Mirrors: Empower and Engage
4.1.1 How Important is Privacy?
4.2 Big Names, Big Hopes: The New Wave of Smart Mirror Rollouts
4.3 Smart Mirrors and Advertisements
4.3.1 Samples of Ad-Mirror Products and Deployments
4.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Mirrors in Retail and Advertising
4.5 Key Points in this Market

Chapter Five: Smart Mirrors in Consumer and Household Applications
5.1 Where, Why and How: Making Home Mirrors Smart
5.1.1 Primary Drivers: Images and Info
5.2 Bed and Bath: Use Cases for Smart Mirrors
5.3 Around the House: Mirror TVs and Other Aesthetics
5.4 Personal Smart Mirrors: Just the Phone, Ma'am
5.5 Eight-Rear Forecasts for Smart Mirrors in Consumer and Household Applications
5.6 Key Points from this Chapter

Chapter Six: Smart Mirrors in Healthcare and Medical Applications
6.1 Smart Mirrors as a Medical Device
6.2 Personal Healthcare: Wellness and Therapy
6.3 Professional Healthcare: Optics to Rehab
6.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Printed and Thin-Film Batteries in Smartcards
6.5 Key Points from this Chapter

Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
About the Author

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown

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