Printer Friendly

Printed from http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/362404

U.S. Preclinical Small Animal Imaging Markets

Description:
The U.S. Preclinical Small Animal Imaging research service provides comprehensive analyses on the six major modalities used in scientific research laboratories in 2005. The six modalities include: Optical (Bioluminescence and Fluorescence), Micro-PET, Micro-CT, Micro-SPECT, Micro-MRI and High Frequency Ultrasound. Market metrics for all six segments include: forecasts for revenues, unit shipments, installed base, pricing trends as well as discussion of competitive structure and respective market share by company. The base year for the study is 2005, with historical data from 2002-2004 and forecast data from 2006-2012. The terms Preclinical and/or Small Animal Imaging are used interchangeably throughout this study.

Technologies
The following technologies are covered in this research:

Optical Imaging: Bioluminescence is the use of transgenic mouse models that carry a fluorophore that can be tracked under an imaging system. Fluorescence imaging is the use of fluorescent markers transplanted into cells and then injected into animals for monitoring and analyses. Typically the least costly of all imaging modalities and the most widely used, optical systems are experiencing an upward trend due to the increasing number of fluorphores and imaging enhancement software available that make these systems readily affordable and feasible for a broad spectrum of end-users.

Micro-PET: Using radio-labeled fluorine and carbon molecules, PET systems image sites of highest metabolic activity, i.e. highest usage of glucose. The ultra high resolution of micro-PET systems and the need for cyclotron-generated markers account for the expensive purchase price, which can approach nearly $1 million.

Micro-CT: Following advances in clinical medicine, Micro-CT systems can image dense structures like bone and the heart with resounding clarity. However, the radiation exposure of X-rays can affect cancer-related studies when an animal is constantly examined under CT systems for prolonged periods.

Micro-SPECT: Unlike PET, micro-SPECT systems use radiopharmaceuticals that have longer half-lives and do not require the need for cyclotrons to generate a marker. Although contrast resolution is inferior to PET systems, SPECT imaging can monitor multiple agents simultaneously. Micro-SPECT systems are also relatively affordable, usually around $500,000.

Micro-MRI: The resolution and spatial contrast of Micro-MRI systems are by far the grandest of any preclinical systems. Largely dependent on magnetic field strength, Micro-MRI systems are able to perform functional and physiological analyses at the tissue level. Also the most expensive of any preclinical system, with prices around $1.5 million depending on magnetic strength, the number of end-users is largely limited to universities and government labs that have the capital and operational capabilities to install a system.

High frequency ultrasound: Employing mature, proven technology that relies on sound waves to image soft tissue, HF-US ranks with optical systems in affordability and range of capabilities. Requiring only modest floor-space and offering ultra-mobile units, HF-US systems can be used by many operators within the same lab. The addition of ligand-specific markers is also making this modality one of the fastest growing in terms of adoption.

Market Sectors
Expert Frost & Sullivan analysts thoroughly examine the following market sectors in this research:

By application:

Preclinical imaging
Installed base
End-user groups
Procedural volume
Competitive structure
By technologies:


Optical imaging
Micro-PET
Micro-SPECT
Micro-CT
Micro-MRI
High frequency ultrasound
 
Contents:
-EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

--Market Overview

---Executive Summary

-TOTAL U.S. PRECLINICAL SMALL ANIMAL IMAGING MARKET

--Market Overview

---Introduction and Market Overview
---Market Drivers
---Market Restraints
---Market Engineering Measurements
---Segmentation
---Total Market Revenue Forecasts
---Total Unit Shipment Forecasts
---Pricing Trends

--Challenges

---Industry Challenges
---Strategic Recommendations
---Overview of Strategic Recommendations

-OPTICAL IMAGING MARKET

--Optical Imaging

---Introduction and Market Overview
---Revenue Forecasts
---Unit Shipment and Installed Base
---Pricing Trends
---Competitive Structure
---Market Share Analysis and Product Overview

-MICRO-PET MICRO-SPECT AND MICRO-CT MARKETS

--Micro-PET Market

---Introduction and Market Overview
---Revenue Forecasts
---Unit Shipment and Installed Base
---Pricing Trends
---Competitive Structure
---Market Share Analysis and Product Overview

--Micro-SPECT Market

---Introduction and Product Overview
---Revenue Forecasts
---Unit Shipment and Installed Base
---Pricing Trends
---Competitive Structure
---Market Share Analysis and Product Overview

--Micro-CT Market

---Introduction and Market Overview
---Revenue Forecasts
---Unit Shipment and Installed Base
---Pricing Trends
---Competitive Structure
---Market Share Analysis and Product Overview

-MICRO-MRI AND HIGH-FREQUENCY ULTRASOUND MARKETS

--Micro-MRI Market

---Introduction and Market Overview
---Revenue Forecasts
---Unit Shipment and Installed Base
---Pricing Trends
---Competitive Structure
---Market Share Analysis and Product Overview

--High Frequency Ultrasound Market

---Introduction and Market Overview
---Revenue Forecasts
---Unit Shipment and Installed Base
---Pricing Trends
---Market Share Analysis and Product Overview

-APPENDIX

--Decision Support Database

---Number of Biotechnology Companies
---Government R&D Spending in Biotechnology
---Private Investment in Biotechnology
---Pharmaceutical R&D Expenditure
---Total Healthcare Expenditure
 
Contents:
Market Overview
Faster Adoption Rates for Preclinical Imaging Driving Sales

Since 2002, the U.S. preclinical imaging market has transitioned from an emerging market to an established one, largely due to the rapid adoption of several types of modalities by a broad spectrum of end users. Increased investment on capital equipment by researchers has translated into greater efforts to develop accurate and sensitive probes from manufacturers. Scientists are also looking for new ways to expand current imaging technologies, and the advent of hybrid technologies such as PET-CT and SPECT-CT is largely a result of the scientific community looking to harness the power of several technologies to monitor experiments on the same animal over a lengthened time course. Besides, many labs are also using various single-modality systems, such as fluorescence and ultrasound, concurrently, to identify the same process across two or more modalities for added confirmation or results. This greater adoption rate among scientists for the breadth of preclinical imaging is surely expected to foster the future growth of the U.S. preclinical small animal imaging markets.

However, high purchase and operational costs continue to stand in the way of the markets further expansion, particularly among the academic segment. This segment comprises nearly 80 percent of end users in the preclinical market and unlike clinical end users, academic and government researchers are mostly dependent on federal and private grant support in order to purchase scientific equipment. "Moreover, the high price points of preclinical systems, ranging from six- to seven-figure price tags, deter individual investigators from buying a system for their own lab," notes the analyst of this research service." Instead, core facilities are developed within research institutions to serve many scientists concurrently, thereby helping defray the cost burden on a single investigator."

Federal Initiatives set to Ensure Markets Development

After being appointed Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2002, Dr. Elias Zerhouni outlined an ambitious strategic plan known as the NIH Roadmap, for the state of current and future directions in scientific innovation. Among the major points of the roadmap was the greater need to identify biological processes in the living animal, or in vivo, through the expanding field of molecular imaging. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) soon followed a similar heightened interest in molecular and preclinical imaging through their 2003 Critical Path to New Medical Products initiative. Consequently, the demand for specific molecular probes as well as imaging systems that can visualize and track probes in living animals has spurred medical imaging manufacturers to develop preclinical systems evolved from many of the technologies already established in clinical medicine. Nearly all clinical imaging modalities, from PET to MRI, have now been replicated for specialty use in small animal models.

Among the individual market segments, optical systems, due to their longer history in pre clinical imaging, account for the largest share of unit shipments, and contribute almost 23 percent of the total revenues in U.S. preclinical small animal imaging markets. Nearly on the same level are micro-MRI and micro-PET systems, which account for 24 and 23 percent, respectively, of total market revenues. "Targeting end users through an applications-based pitch could prove particularly beneficial for market participants, as scientists are more receptive to ways the equipment will help in their experiments," says the analyst. " Hence, approaching a customer with the depth of applications and upgrades available on a system could, in fact, be a more effective sales tool."
 
Ordering:
Order Online - visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/362404

Order by Fax - using the order form below

Order By Post - print the order form below and send to

Research and Markets,
Guinness Centre,
Taylors Lane,
Dublin 8,
Ireland.

 
Page 1 of 2
Printed Oct 1st 2014
10:54:23 PM

Fax order form

To place a fax order simply print this form, fill in and fax the completed form to the number below. If you have any questions please email help@researchandmarkets.net

Order information

Please verify that the product information is correct and select the format you require.

Product name

U.S. Preclinical Small Animal Imaging Markets

Web Address

http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/362404

Office Code

OCGOOGLE

 

Report Formats

Please enter the quantity of the report format you require.

Format Quantity Price
Electronic (PDF) - Site License USD 6,500
Electronic (PDF) - Enterprisewide USD 8,000
Electronic and Hard Copy (PDF) - Enterprisewide USD 8,500 + USD 65 Shipping/Handling *
Electronic and Hard Copy (PDF) - Site License USD 7,000 + USD 65 Shipping/Handling *

* Shipping/Handling is only charged once per order.

Contact information

Please enter all the information below in block capitals.

Title:
Mr Mrs Dr Miss Ms Prof
First Name:
Last Name:
Email Address:
Job Title:
Organisation:
Address:
City:
Postal / Zip Code:
Country:
Phone Number:
Fax Number:

Please fax this form to:
(646) 607-1907 or (646) 964-6609 (from USA)
+353-1-481-1716 or +353-1-653-1571 (from Rest of World)

Page 2 of 2
Printed Oct 1st 2014
10:54:23 PM

Payment information

Please indicate the payment method you would like to use by selecting the appropriate box.

Pay by Credit Card:

American Express

Diners Club

Master Card

Visa

Cardholder's Name:
Cardholder's Signature:
Expiry Date:
/
Card Number:
CVV Security Code:
Issue date:
/ (Diners Club only)
 
Pay by Check:

Please post the check, accompanied by this form, to:

Research and Markets,
Guinness Centre,
Taylors Lane,
Dublin 8,
Ireland.

 
Pay by Wire Transfer:

Please transfer funds to:

Account Number:
83313083
Sort Code:
98-53-30
Swift Code:
ULSBIE2D
IBAN Number:
IE78ULSB98533083313083
Bank Address:
Ulster Bank,
27-35 Main Street
Blackrock,
Co. Dublin
Ireland.
 

If you have a Marketing Code please enter it below:

Marketing Code:

Please note that by ordering from Research and Markets you are agreeing to our Terms and Conditions at http://www.researchandmarkets.com/info/terms.asp

Please fax this form to:
(646) 607-1907 or (646) 964-6609 (from USA)
+353-1-481-1716 or +353-1-653-1571 (from Rest of World)