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The DTC Marketing Outlook: New Challenges And Opportunities In Consumer-Targeted Pharmaceutical Promotion Product Image

The DTC Marketing Outlook: New Challenges And Opportunities In Consumer-Targeted Pharmaceutical Promotion

  • Published: September 2003
  • 122 pages
  • Scripp Business Insights

The new management report, The DTC Marketing Outlook 2003: New challenges and opportunities in consumer-targeted pharmaceutical promotion, analyzes the latest developments in DTC marketing and unveils the new channels and markets that have the potential to boost product sales, awareness and revenue. Understand the benefits of using Interactive TV (iTV) in your promotional campaign, recognize how Disease Awareness Campaigns (DACs) can help you to establish product presence in new markets and find out which regulations could help or hinder your promotional campaign in different geographical markets. This new report will show you how by empowering consumers with disease and product information utilizing effective DTC marketing techniques, you will see improvements in ROI, branding, consumer attention and product awareness.

Executive Summary
DTC marketing: past, present and future
New channels: iTV in pharma
New markets: raising disease awareness in Europe
New regulations: eHealth legislation in the US and Europe

Chapter 1 DTC marketing: past, present and future
Summary
Introduction
Consumers as substitute sales reps
Trends in branded DTC marketing
1997-2000: rapid expansion of DTC marketing spend
DTC creates new markets
2000-02: investment slows then declines
Growth in sampling cannibalizes DTC spend
Segmentation of investment
Future trends in DTC marketing
Media integration
Lifecycle marketing
Focus on consumers and compliance
Segment-based and personalized marketing

Chapter 2 New channels: iTV in pharma
Summary
Introduction
Benefits of iTV marketing
Relevance to DTC marketing
What is iTV CRM?
Operational and analytical CRM
Characterizing and understanding the target audience: analytical CRM
Tracking viewing preferences
Sample groups
Monitoring and encouraging interactivity
Control over data
Integration is the biggest barrier
Making and maintaining customer contact: operational CRM
Response to advertising
Callback
Service relationship
Future CRM will exploit iTVs specific capabilities
Video chat
Personalized advertising
Audience controlled interactive advertising
CRM opportunities for brands and service companies
High involvement, significant differences
High involvement, few differences
Low involvement, significant differences
Low involvement, few differences
Pharmaceutical industrys position

Chapter 3 New markets: raising disease
awareness in Europe
Summary
Introduction
The legal context
What are disease awareness campaigns?
Pharmaceutical and consumer support for disease awareness campaigns
The case for the opposition
Selecting appropriate medical conditions
From the consumers perspective
From the companys perspective
Maximizing outcomes
Raising advertising awareness
Segmenting the target population
Selecting the campaign message
Choosing the right media mix
Summary: the ideal DAC
Raising disease awareness AstraZenecas migraine campaign
Disease management GlaxoSmithKlines asthma campaign
Focusing on compliance Roche provides telephone support for
Xenical patients

Chapter 4 New regulations: eHealth and eSecurity legislation in the US and Europe
Summary
Introduction
Europe
Overview of pharmaceutical patient-targeted marketing controls
Self-regulatory organizations
International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Associations
European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industry Associations
Regulations
WHO ethical criteria
EEC Directive on Advertising of Medicines 92/28
EC proposal to relax portions of the DTC advertising ban
Disease awareness campaign guidelines
US
Overview of pharmaceutical patient-targeted marketing controls
Self-regulatory organizations
Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America
Regulations
Pre-1997
1997 onwards: FDA guidance on consumer-directed broadcast
advertisements
Regulatory abuse
eSecurity
The healthcare IT challenge: improving quality and efficiency while assuring
individual privacy
Europe Data Protection Directive
OECD guidelines and the EU Directive are applicable to all
Personally Identifiable Information
US HIPAA
Background to HIPAA
Privacy, the First Amendment and direct marketing
Impact of HIPAA on DTC marketing
Online security
Security technologies
A cautionary tale of a breech in online security: Lillys Prozac

Chapter 5 Appendix
Index
List of Figures
Figure 1.1: Larger sales forces are no more efficient at revenue generation than smaller sales forces
Figure 1.2: US DTC marketing investment, 1996-2002
Figure 1.3: US promotional investment patterns, 2000-01
Figure 1.4: Investment in physician detailing and DTC marketing display a strong, inverse linear relationship
Figure 1.5: Future trends in DTC marketing
Figure 2.6: The two arms of CRM
Figure 2.7: The aims of analytical CRM, as offered by iTV
Figure 2.8: Evolution of business intelligence
Figure 2.9: Four operational CRM models
Figure 2.10: Consumer behavior matrix product involvement and differentiation
Figure 3.1: Consumers typically consider themselves highly health conscious even if they do not actively seek health information
Figure 3.2: Consumers online health information needs a proxy for therapeutic suitability of disease awareness campaigns
Figure 3.3: Meeting consumers needs designing the optimal multi-channel disease awareness campaign
Figure 3.4: Targeting young British adults with asthma GlaxoSmithKlines actionasthma.co.uk
Figure 4.5: The self-regulatory code on a national level in Europe is derived from the European
Federation of Pharmaceutical Industry Associations code
Figure 4.6: Timeline to DTC information/advertising in the EU
Figure 4.7: US pharmaceutical marketing regulations are primarily controlled by FDA guidance rather than by self-regulatory codes

List of Tables
Table 1.1: US promotional investment patterns, 2000-01
Table 1.2: Segmentation of total US DTC marketing spend by company, September 2001-02
Table 1.3: Leading products? share of total US DTC marketing spend, 2000-02

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