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Prospects for the Textile and Clothing Industry in Madagascar - Product Image

Prospects for the Textile and Clothing Industry in Madagascar

  • ID: 38735
  • January 2002
  • Region: Madagascar
  • 28 pages
  • Textiles Intelligence

Research based report which provides detailed information, data, and analysis on the textile and apparel industry in Madagascar. The report examines the impact on the industry of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (Agoa). It also looks at the country's appeal as a target for foreign investment, and provides an assessment of the future prospects for the textile and apparel industry in Madagascar.

Introduction<BR>Population<BR>Political and economic history<BR>Industry Development<BR>Investment<BR>Industry Location<BR>Products, Customers and Markets<BR>Products<BR>Customers and markets<BR>Competitiveness<BR>Cost comparisons<BR>Corruption<BR>Strengths<BR>Weaknesses<BR>Employment Regulations and Practices<BR>Training<BR>Local perceptions of the industry<BR>Foreigners' perceptions of the local population<BR>Production and Technology<BR>Materials, Trim and Accessories<BR>Infrastructure, Transportation and Shipping<BR>The Impact of September 11<BR>Future Prospects<BR>Selected Internet-Based Information Sources<BR><BR>List of tables<BR><BR>Table 1: Textile and apparel exports from selected Sub-Saharan African countries to the USA, Jan-Jun 2000-01<BR>Table 2: Textile and apparel exports from selected Sub-Saharan African countries to the USA, Jun-Nov, 2001<BR>Table 3: Madagascar: historical development, 1500-2001<BR>Table 4: Madagascar: political and economic profile, 2001<BR>Table 5: Madagascar: population and economic indicators, 2000<BR>Table 6: Infrastructure benchmarking<BR><BR>List of figures<BR><BR>Figure 1 Growth in textile and apparel exports from selected sub-Saharan African countries to the USA, Jan-Jun 2001<BR>Figure 2 Textile and apparel exports from selected sub-Saharan African countries to the USA, Jun-Nov 2001<BR>Figure 3 Foreign direct investment into Madagascar, 1996-99<BR>Figure 4 Madagascar: growth of the Malagasy EPZ<BR>

Madagascar’s apparel industry is the fastest growing in Sub-Saharan Africa. <BR><BR>In the first half of 2001 alone, apparel exports to the USA rose by 73%. The industry has attracted investors from as far afield as China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Pakistan and Singapore, as well as from Dubai, Saudi Arabia and UAE.<BR><BR>Madagascar offers low labour costs, relative political stability and has a low level of HIV and AIDS. Furthermore, it enjoys quota- and duty-free access to EU markets under the Lomé convention, and to the US market under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). And, because Madagascar is treated as a lesser developed Sub-Saharan African country, its apparel makers are able to source yarns and<BR>fabrics from anywhere in the world without losing AGOA benefits.<BR><BR>But some firms complain of a poor infrastructure, administrative difficulties and “hidden” costs. Also, the future is uncertain. After September 2004, exporters to the USA will have to use fabric made in Sub-Saharan Africa or in the USA to avoid paying duty—unless the exemption for lesser developed countries is extended. Also, quota-free<BR>access will cease to be an advantage for Madagascar after 2004, when quotas on trade between all WTO (World Trade Organisation) members are due to be eliminated.<BR><BR>Nonetheless, larger investors are confident about Madagascar’s future. The local workforce is said to be hard working and produces good quality. Madagascar is also well<BR>situated—goods can be shipped to Europe in just 20-24 days, half the time it takes to ship from China.<BR>

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