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Smart Cards – Current Trends, Developments and Future Prospects in the Healthcare Industry

  • ID: 41726
  • January 2004
  • Region: Australia, Canada, Taiwan, United States
  • 104 Pages
  • HBS Medical Limited
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- Industry-specific strategic recommendations that may be used by market participants and companies that are seeking to benefit from the growing use of smart cards in the healthcare industry.

- An insight into the market and an overview of the latest trends.

- A summary of the key factors that are anticipated to have an impact on future developments

- A comprehensive analysis of smart card opportunity across a healthcare market - forecasts and growth projections.

This latest strategic publication on smart cards in the healthcare industry provides:

-An insight into the market and an overview of the latest trends.

-A summary of the key factors that are anticipated to have an impact on future developments.

-A comprehensive analysis of smart card opportunity across a healthcare market - forecasts and growth projections.

-Industry-specific strategic recommendations that may be used by market participants and companies that are seeking to benefit from the growing use of smart cards in the healthcare industry.

This strategy review is an outcome of the extensive research with the contribution of both market participants, government READ MORE >

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1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1.1 SYSTEMS UNDER PRESSURE
1.2 TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES
1.3 SMART CARDS CAN HELP
1.4 A DEVELOPING TECHNOLOGY
1.5 A POLITICAL WILL
1.6 A MAJOR MARKET
1.7 DO HEALTH CARDS STAND ALONE?

2 INTRODUCTION
2.1 INTRODUCTION
2.2 PROJECT OBJECTIVES
2.3 METHODOLOGY
Smart Cards / Card reading devices / Suppliers
Other Schemes
2.4 GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE
2.5 RESPONDENT POPULATION

3 SMART CARDS – AN OVERVIEW
3.1 A BRIEF GUIDE TO SMART CARD TECHNOLOGY
Types of smart card
Typical memory sizes
Alternative card types
Card interfaces
Card software
Multi-application cards
Java Card
MULTOS
3.2 MARKETS FOR SMART CARDS
Mobile communications
Banking
Mass transit
ID card systems

4 WHY DOES THE HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY NEED SMART CARDS?
4.1 THE HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY TODAY
Cost escalation
Quality expectations
Lack of cohesion and anachronistic practices
Technological factors within the healthcare sector
Political factors
4.2 HOW CAN SMART CARDS HELP?
4.3 A HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF SMART CARDS IN HEALTHCARE
4.4 PLANNING A SYSTEM
Interoperability
4.5 STANDARDISATION ACTIVITIES

5 COUNTRY SURVEY
5.1 EUROPEAN HEALTH CARD SCHEMES
AUSTRIA
BELGIUM
SIS – Social Identity Card
CZECH REPUBLIC
Macha/Macha II
FINLAND
FRANCE
GERMANY
ITALY
THE NETHERLANDS
OTHER SCHEMES IN THE NETHERLANDS
Traumaweb
Zorg en Zekerheid
NORWAY
SLOVENIA
SPAIN
SWEDEN
UNITED KINGDOM
BREAKING NEWS - OTHER EUROPEAN SYSTEMS
5.2 SMART CARDS IN HEALTHCARE OUTSIDE EUROPE
UNITED STATES
CANADA
TAIWAN
AUSTRALIA

6 EUROPEAN COMMISSION ACTIVITY ON HEALTHCARDS
6.1 EUROPEAN HEALTH INSURANCE CARD
Existing projects
6.2 eEUROPE

7 THE EUROPEAN MARKET SITUATION FOR SMART CARDS IN HEALTHCARE
7.1 MARKET SIZE
Just where will these cards go?
7.2 MARKET CHALLENGES
Legal issues
Political issues
Organisational issues
7.3 SYSTEMS CONSIDERATIONS
Security trends
Multi-application potential
Card costs
Interoperability

8 SMART CARD SYSTEMS AND THEIR SUPPLIERS
8.1 CARD SYSTEMS – THE OVERALL PICTURE
8.2 THE SMART CARD VALUE CHAIN
8.3 SUPPLIER TACTICS
Local focus
Joint ventures
8.4 THE CARD MANUFACTURERS
Axalto (a Schlumberger company)
Gemplus
Giesecke & Devrient
Oberthur Card Systems
ORGA

9 STRATEGIC RECOMMENDATIONS
9.1 THE FUTURE MARKET FOR SMART CARD SYSTEMS IN HEALTHCARE IN EUROPE
9.2 IMPACT OF CARD TECHNOLOGY CHANGE ON THE HEALTHCARE MARKET FOR CARDS
9.3 IMPLEMENTATION LESSONS
The Slovenian experience
9.4 STRATEGIC RECOMMENDATIONS
Organisational issues
Systems development considerations
Supply strategies

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Over the past few years, the European healthcare sector has seen major growth in the use of IT for delivery of healthcare services and for the management of the healthcare business. Uses include telemedicine, electronic medical records, electronic prescribing, appointments booking and information services. These systems are being introduced in response to cost and organisational problems facing healthcare providers everywhere.

For many countries, one significant key to getting the best out of these applications has proved to be the use of smart cards. Over the past twenty years, smart cards have become increasingly important in a number of European sectors: mobile communications, banking, corporate uses and transport. Now they are taking their place in healthcare and in other eGovernment applications such as identity. According to industry body Eurosmart, shipments of microprocessor cards to the whole government sector worldwide will rise from 32 million in 2002 to an estimated 60 million in 2004. In general, cards can be used to store data, to prove identity and as a key to access information.

In healthcare that translates to storing medical data on card, proving entitlement to healthcare benefits giving access to healthcare networks. Originally, cards were marketed to healthcare on the basis of the application, for example storage of medical records emergency data, but in fact data storage has become far the least prevalent use in healthcare. As research shows, cards are currently most often used in Europe to prove entitlement to healthcare services (for example France and Germany) but increasingly their security abilities are being leveraged. With one healthcare trend being towards using public key infrastructures protect information stored on either centralised or (more likely in Europe) distributed networks, cards can be used to store the keys and certificates needed for PKI.

They can also store pointers, linking data in separate databases, while at the same time protecting privacy. present, it is more likely that PKI will be used with health professional cards, giving the doctor access to medical information but France, for example, is considering extending the use of PKI to patient health cards too. There is already actual or imminent healthcare use smart cards in the following European countries:

-Austria
-Belgium
-Czech Republic
-Finland
-France
-Germany
-Italy
-The Netherlands
-Norway
-Romania
-Slovenia
-Spain
-Sweden
-United Kingdom.

Some of these systems are national, others are more specific either to a region or to a medical speciality. It is the latter type where data storage continues to be more important – for example the Parkinson Pass in the Netherlands. This latest report explains in depth how many of these systems operate, what benefits they provide and gives useful technical and organisational information about these schemes. It highlights obstacles faced and lessons learnt in implementing existing systems and places them within the context of the overall structure of healthcare provision within their country.

It looks at some of the commercial structures and supply trends relating to companies providing these systems. It comments on the realism of some of the deadlines for schemes still in the planning stage. It also looks at certain non-European schemes that are viewed as especially significant. In Europe healthcare is still primarily viewed as a separate application warranting the use of a separate card. Elsewhere, it is more likely to be a function, added to a general eGovernment services card, for example the soon to be issued Thai ID card. In the United States health insurers are even considering adding commercial applications to health insurance cards.

European attitudes to privacy and various organisational issues associated with running multi-application card schemes mean that adding health as an application to a multiapplication card is unlikely to become a widespread trend in Europe. Nonetheless some countries, such as Belgium and Italy are examining this option. Smart card usage is not just national or local in origin. The European Commission has taken an active interest in promoting the use of smart cards in healthcare for many years. Now they have mandated that the existing paper E111 forms, giving access to emergency mhealthcare in other European member states, should migrate to cards, starting 2004. Will these cards be smart though, and how will this impact individual national plans to roll out healthcare cards and existing programmes?

In theory, with the expanded European Union set to hit a population high of over 450 million from mid 2004, the potential market for health cards could be huge. In practice, not all countries will adopt national smart health cards, with or without an E111 function. The report names one particular European country where this seems particularly unlikely for commercial reasons. Another existing system is viewed by some as exemplary – we highlight it. Nonetheless we predict a potential market size of over 220 million cards over the next five years across Europe, more than two thirds of which systems do not yet have defined suppliers. These are highlighted within the report.

Where suppliers are active though there do seem to be defined trends in terms of commercial groupings and particular important players – the report highlights these too. This report by HBS Consulting places information about health cards within the overall context of smart card activity in Europe and of general trends within healthcare provision in Europe. Thanks to extensive primary research it features in depth information about specific schemes from their operators and it comments on specific trends within the industry, often from the point of view of existing suppliers.

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