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Unlocking the Plastic Surgery Market: Understanding Plastic Surgeons' Behaviors, Attitudes and Perceptions Product Image

Unlocking the Plastic Surgery Market: Understanding Plastic Surgeons' Behaviors, Attitudes and Perceptions

  • Published: November 2006
  • Region: Global
  • 183 Pages
  • Valid Results

FEATURED COMPANIES

  • Allergan
  • BioForm
  • Candela
  • Implantech
  • Integra
  • Mentor
  • MORE

Plastic surgery is currently undergoing a dynamic transition. Surgeons are moving their practices away from reconstructive procedures and increasing their cosmetic cases. Increasing insurance difficulties for reconstructive procedures, coupled with technological advancements and cultural acceptance of cosmetic procedures, are driving this change.

There are currently a number of leading companies that dominate the various product categories within plastic surgery. In addition to being used by a majority of surgeons, these companies also have the highest satisfaction, highest loyalty and clearly defined positions within plastic surgery.

A Snapshot of Plastic Surgeons’ Practices, Procedures, Trends and Sites of Care

The results feature a summary of surgeons’ self-reported procedures by category (non-invasive, minimally invasive, invasive, cosmetic, and reconstructive) and site of care. Also included is a summary of patient characteristics and trends in converting consultations into procedures.

The results indicate plastic surgery is changing as new cosmetic minimally invasive procedures become more popular. Surgeons are migrating away from traditional READ MORE >

Introduction & Report Overview
Abstract
Measurement Objectives
Sample Design & Distribution
Measurement & Data Collection Design
How to read this report

Executive Summary & Key Findings
Detailed Findings

I. Plastic Surgeon Demographics

a. Plastic Surgeon Years in practice
b. Plastic Surgeon Sites of care (where do they perform their procedures)
i. Primary hospitals
ii. Surgery centers
iii. Private offices
c. Plastic Surgeon gender

II. Plastic Surgeons Procedures

a. Plastic Surgeons procedures performed by category
i. Reconstructive
ii. Cosmetic non-invasive
iii. Cosmetic minimally invasive
iv. Cosmetic surgical invasive
v. Other
b. Plastic Surgeons cosmetic surgical procedures performed by type
i. Rhinoplasty
ii. Liposuction
iii. Blepharoplasty
iv. Breast augmentation
v. Rhytidectomy
vi. Abdominoplasty
vii. Brow lift
c. Plastic Surgeons cosmetic surgical procedures performed at various sites of care
i. Hospital
ii. Ambulatory / Surgery center
iii. Private office
d. Plastic Surgeons cosmetic surgical procedural trends
i. Increase from past year
ii. Decrease from past year
iii. No change from past year
e. Plastic Surgeons cosmetic non-surgical treatments by type
i. Botox Injections
ii. Chemical Peels
iii. Microdermabrasion
iv. Laser Hair Removal
v. Sclerotherapy
vi. Soft Tissue Filler
f. Plastic Surgeons cosmetic non-surgical treatments performed at various sites of care
i. Hospital
ii. Ambulatory / Surgery center
iii. Private office
g. Plastic Surgeons cosmetic non-surgical treatment trends
i. Increase from past year
ii. Decrease from past year
iii. No change from past year

III. The Cosmetic Patient Profile

a. Plastic Surgeons patients seen by procedural type
i. Overall / Typical month
ii. Cosmetic
b. Plastic Surgeons cosmetic patients conversion trends
i. Consultation
ii. Cosmetic Procedural Outcomes
c. Repeat patients treated by surgeon personally vs. another surgeon
d. Patient age
e. Patient gender
f. Patient ethnicity

Conclusions
Recommendations
Suggested Analysis
About the Author

Table of Figures

Figure A-1 Geographical Spread of respondents
Table 1-1 Number of Years in Practice
Figure 1-1 Years in Practice Pie chart (Quartile %)
Figure 1-2 Years in Practice Histogram
Table 1-2 Sites of Care
Table 1-3 Operating Suites
Table 1-4 Other Plastic Surgeons
Figure 1-3 Sites of Care Demographic
Table 1-5 Male vs. Female Surgeon Respondents
Figure 1-4 Surgeon Respondent Gender Pie Chart
Table 2-1 Specific Procedures Performed Per Month
Figure 2-1 Number of Specific Procedures Performed Per Month
Table 2-2 Specific Cosmetic Surgical Procedures Performed Per Month
Figure 2-2 Specific Cosmetic Surgical Procedures Performed Per Month
Table 2-3 Specific Cosmetic Surgical Procedures Performed at Various Sites of Care
Figure 2-3 Percentage of Specific Cosmetic Surgical Procedures Performed at Various Sites of Care
Table 2-4 Changes to the Number of Cosmetic Surgical Procedures Over The Past Year
Figure 2-4 Net Percentage of Surgeons Reporting an Increase in the Number of Featured Procedures
Table 2-5 Specific Cosmetic Non-Surgical Procedures Performed Per Month
Figure 2-5 Number of Specific Cosmetic Non-Surgical Procedures Performed Per Month
Table 2-6 Specific Cosmetic Non-Surgical Procedures Performed at Various Sites of Care
Figure 2-6 Percent of Specific Cosmetic Non-Surgical Procedures Performed at Various Sites of Care
Table 2-7 Changes to the Number of Cosmetic Non-Surgical Procedures Over the Past Year
Figure 2-7 Net Percent of Surgeons Reporting an Increase in the Number of Featured Procedures per Year
Table 3-1 Cosmetic Patients Seen and Not Treated
Figure 3-1 Cosmetic vs. Reconstruction Patients and Consultation Only vs. Therapy Received
Table 3-2 Changes in the Number of Patients Electing Cosmetic Treatments Following Consultation
Figure 3-2 Percent of Surgeons Who Experience Changes in the Number of Patients Electing Cosmetic Treatments Following Consultation
Table 3-3 Repeat Patients Treated by Surgeons Personally vs. another Surgeon
Figure 3-3 Percentage of Repeat Patients Treated by Surgeons Personally vs. another surgeon
Table 3-4 Cosmetic Patients per Age Category
Figure 3-4 Percentage of Cosmetic Patients per age Category
Table 3-5 Cosmetic Patients Gender
Figure 3-5 Percentage of Female vs. Male Cosmetic Patient
Table 3-6 Cosmetic Patients Race
Figure 3-6 Percentage of Cosmetic Patients per Race Category

Plastic Surgery - Plastic Surgery - The Customer Connection - How to Increase the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Sales Calls, Marketing And Professional Education - How to Increase the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Sales Calls, Marketing and Professional Education

Introduction & Report Overview
Abstract
Measurement Objectives
Sample Design & Distribution Measurement & Data Collection Design
How to read this report
Executive Summary & Key Findings
Detailed Findings

IV. Medical Sales Representatives seen by Plastic Surgeons

a. # of times sales reps are seen in a typical month (for any company)
b. Frequency of specific sales rep visits for each of the listed companies
i. Allergan
ii. Bard / Davol
iii. BioForm
iv. Byron Medical
v. Candela
vi. Ethicon
vii. Implantech
viii. Inamed
ix. Integra
x. Medicis
xi. Mentor
xii. Spectrum
xiii. Thermage
xiv. Tyco
c. Quality of information presented in sales rep meetings for specific companies 18
(New and Valuable)
(New, Not Valuable)
(Not New, Valuable)
(Neither New nor Valuable)
i. Allergan
ii. Bard / Davol
iii. BioForm
iv. Byron Medical
v. Candela
vi. Ethicon
vii. Implantech
viii. Inamed
ix. Integra
x. Medicis
xi. Mentor
xii. Spectrum
xiii. Thermage
xiv. Tyco
d. How often do plastic surgeons prefer to be seen by sales reps
i. Weekly
ii. 2 Times per Month
iii. Monthly
iv. 3-4 Times per Year
v. 1 Time per Year or Less
vi. Never
vii. Only When I Request
viii. Only When They Have New Products or Information to Share

V. Professional Medical Education for Plastic Surgeons

a. How many professional education events do plastic surgeons attend annually
b. How often do plastic surgeons attend events by the following companies
i. Allergan
ii. Bard / Davol
iii. BioForm
iv. Byron Medical
v. Candela
vi. Ethicon
vii. Implantech
viii. Inamed
ix. Integra
x. Medicis
xi. Mentor
xii. Spectrum
xiii. Thermage
xiv. Tyco
c. What is the quality of the professional education events attended by plastic surgeons
(Poor)
(Needs Improvement)
(About Average)
(Good)
(Excellent)
i. Allergan
ii. Bard / Davol
iii. BioForm
iv. Byron Medical
v. Candela
vi. Ethicon
vii. Implantech
viii. Inamed
ix. Integra
x. Medicis
xi. Mentor
xii. Spectrum
xiii. Thermage
xiv. Tyco

VI. Information Sources for Plastic Surgeons

a. Plastic Surgeons preferences for learning about new products
i. Internet
ii. Journals
iii. Conventions
iv. Sales reps
v. Company sponsored events
vi. Colleagues
vii. Multimedia (CD/DVD)
viii. Academic environment (University, Grand rounds, etc.)
b. Plastic Surgeons preferences for learning about new methods, techniques, treatments
i. Internet
ii. Journals
iii. Conventions
iv. Sales reps
v. Company sponsored events
vi. Colleagues
vii. Multimedia (CD/DVD)
viii. Academic environment (University, Grand rounds, etc.)
c. What are the marketing practices of Plastic Surgeons
i. Print advertising (magazine, newspaper, billboard, yellow pages)
ii. TV advertising
iii. Radio
iv. Web site or internet
v. Networking / Developing additional referring physicians
vi. Educational seminars / Q & A sessions for public
vii. Community activities or charitable involvement
viii. Contact with workers comp case managers
ix. Contact with large companies in local area
d. Time spent on internet & reading medical journals for professional purposes

VII. Plastic Surgeon Attitudes

What are plastic surgeons level of agreement with featured product statements
(Strongly Disagree)
(Disagree)
(Slightly Disagree)

100 American Medical Association (AMA) board certified plastic surgeons were randomly selected from a list of 6300 surgeons to participate in a self-administered questionnaire (SAQ) featured on the internet. Upon completion of the SAQ, 20 of the participants were selected to participate in a follow-up depth interview conducted via the telephone.

The purpose of the study is to provide information on surgical practice characteristics, procedures performed and patient characteristics to be used at face value, as well as in conjunction with other data to segment the market.

Marketing, sales, product development and strategic planning efforts should be grounded within the context of what is important to the surgeons. The results of this research are clear in identifying efficacy and patient satisfaction as the most important considerations (safety is assumed).

The principle determinant of patient satisfaction is product efficacy, as defined by the magnitude of the treatment effect and the long term duration of the results. The relationship between these considerations indicates that concentrating on efficacy will also satisfy the criteria for patient satisfaction. When there is limited discrimination between competitive products on these considerations the importance of sales reps and customer service becomes paramount.

Overall, plastic surgeons perceive sales reps to be valuable to their practices by informing them of new products and as such, allocate time to see them. There are indicators that the frequency of sales rep visits are related to product use, however, this relationship needs to be explored in greater depth. Sales reps are not a preferred source for, and therefore have limited influence in, learning about new methods, techniques or treatments.

The frequency of sales reps visits, as well as their perceived value, varies by manufacturer. Many of the industry leaders in various product categories are also the companies’ whose reps are seen most frequently. The perceived value of sales rep visits can be increased by presenting new information to the surgeons.

Company sponsored professional education is popular among plastic surgeons and attended by 9 of 10 surgeons. Mentor, Inamed and Allergan events are attended by the greatest number of surgeons and all three are rated near the top in perceived value. The value of professional education events can be improved by integrating information surgeons are seeking, namely marketing and business practices assistance.

There are currently a number of leading companies that dominate the various product categories within plastic surgery. In addition to being used by a majority of surgeons, these companies also have the highest satisfaction, highest loyalty and clearly defined positions within plastic surgery.

Surgeons effectively discriminate between some companies based on their association with various descriptive terms, while other companies are grouped together. Ethicon is considered “Traditional”, while Inamed and Mentor are considered “Flexible” and “Professional”. Ethicon, Inamed and Mentor share the quality of being considered “Established”. Companies considered “Up & Coming” include: Medicis, Lifecell and Allergan. Byron and Coapt are best described as “Cutting Edge”.

Overall, perceptions of companies are positive, although some companies (Mentor, Inamed, Ethicon and Allergan) are clearly seen as superior.

Three product areas are used most frequently: injectables, sutures and breast implants. The suture category has a clear leader in Ethicon, but the other two categories are split between two products being used most frequently. The injectable category features the use of Allergan’s Botox, as well as Medicis’ Restylane. The breast implant category features the use of Mentor products, as well as Inamed products.

Product switching is rare within these categories, but does occur. Approximately 25% of surgeons have switched products within the implant and wound closure categories, compared to 5% within the injectable category. Clearly, the number of competitive alternative products within a category contributes to the switching dynamics. The motivation for switching is based on the factors previously identified as important in determining product preferences, including efficacy, cost and patient satisfaction.

Loyalty and satisfaction are clearly related to product use. The leaders in loyalty are the same products used most frequently within the various product categories, including: Allergan’s Botox, Ethicon’s sutures, Medicis’ Restylane, Byron’s liposuction equipment and Inamed’s implants. While reported loyalty is relatively high, there are opportunities for companies to increase product loyalty. Many of these opportunities are based on a financial incentive or reward.

-Allergan
-Bard / Davol
-BioForm
-Byron Medical
-Candela
-Ethicon
-Implantech
-Inamed
-Integra
-Medicis
-Mentor
-Spectrum
-Thermage
-Tyco

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