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Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in South Africa: A Strategic Reference, 2007 - Product Image

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in South Africa: A Strategic Reference, 2007

  • ID: 602068
  • July 2007
  • Region: Africa, South Africa
  • 272 pages
  • ICON Group International

How to Strategically Evaluate South Africa

Perhaps the most efficient way of evaluating South Africa is to consider key dimensions which themselves are composites of multiple factors. Composite portfolio approaches have long been used by strategic planners. The biggest challenge in this approach is to choose the appropriate factors that are the most relevant to international planning. The two measures of greatest relevance to information and communication technology (ict) are “latent demand” and “market accessibility”. The figure below summarizes the key dimensions and recommendations of such an approach. Using these two composites, one can prioritize all countries of the world. Countries of high latent demand and high relative accessibility (e.g. easier entry for one firm compared to other firms) are given highest priority. The figure below shows two different scenarios. Accessibility is defined as a firm’s ease of entering or supplying from or to a market (the “supply side”), and latent demand is an indicator of the potential in serving from or to the market (the “demand side”).
Framework for Prioritizing Countries

Demand/Market READ MORE >

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1 INTRODUCTION & METHODOLOGY 1
1.1 What Does This Report Cover? 1
1.2 How to Strategically Evaluate South Africa 1
1.3 Latent Demand and Accessibility in South Africa 3
2 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (ICT) IN SOUTH AFRICA 5
2.1 Latent Demand and Accessibility: Background 5
2.2 Latent Demand: Leading Segments 5
2.2.1 Fixed Lines 5
2.2.2 Cellular 6
2.2.3 Internet 7
2.2.4 Data 7
2.2.5 Satellite 7
2.2.6 Submarine 7
2.3 Accessibility: The Structure of Competition 8
2.4 Latent Demand: Market Data 8
2.5 Latent Demand: Dynamics 9
2.6 Key Suppliers 10
2.7 Prospective Buyers 10
2.7.1 Public Sector 10
2.7.2 Private Sector 11
2.8 Accessibility: Market Entry 11
2.8.1 Regulations and Policy 12
2.8.2 Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) 12
2.8.3 Distribution 12
2.8.4 Financing 13
2.8.5 Licenses 13
2.8.6 Import Duties 13
2.8.7 Government Tenders 13
2.8.8 Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBEE) 13
2.8.9 Industrial Participation Program (IP) 14
2.9 Key Contacts 14
2.9.1 Publications 14
2.9.2 Government Organizations 14
2.9.3 Trade Organizations 15
2.9.4 Chambers of Commerce 15
3 FINANCIAL INDICATORS: COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT 16
3.1 Overview 16
3.1.1 Financial Returns and Gaps in South Africa 17
3.1.2 Labor Productivity Gaps in South Africa 20
3.1.3 Limitations and Extensions 20
3.2 Financial Returns in South Africa: Asset Structure Ratios 21
3.2.1 Overview 21
3.2.2 Assets - Definitions of Terms 21
3.2.3 Asset Structure: Outlook 24
3.2.4 Large Variances: Assets 25
3.2.5 Key Percentiles and Rankings 28
3.3 Financial Returns in South Africa: Liability Structure Ratios 49
3.3.1 Overview 49
3.3.2 Liabilities and Equity - Definitions of Terms 49
3.3.3 Liability Structure: Outlook 51
3.3.4 Large Variances: Liabilities 52
3.3.5 Key Percentiles and Rankings 55
3.4 Financial Returns in South Africa: Income Structure Ratios 73
3.4.1 Overview 73
3.4.2 Income Statements - Definitions of Terms 73
3.4.3 Income Structure: Outlook 76
3.4.4 Large Variances: Income 77
3.4.5 Key Percentiles and Rankings 80
3.5 Financial Returns in South Africa: Profitability Ratios 100
3.5.1 Overview 100
3.5.2 Ratios - Definitions of Terms 100
3.5.3 Ratio Structure: Outlook 102
3.5.4 Large Variances: Ratios 103
3.5.5 Key Percentiles and Rankings 106
3.6 Productivity in South Africa: Asset-Labor Ratios 128
3.6.1 Overview 128
3.6.2 Asset to Labor: Outlook 129
3.6.3 Asset to Labor: International Gaps 130
3.6.4 Key Percentiles and Rankings 133
3.7 Productivity in South Africa: Liability-Labor Ratios 154
3.7.1 Overview 154
3.7.2 Liability to Labor: Outlook 155
3.7.3 Liability and Equity to Labor: International Gaps 156
3.7.4 Key Percentiles and Rankings 159
3.8 Productivity in South Africa: Income-Labor Ratios 177
3.8.1 Overview 177
3.8.2 Income to Labor: Outlook 178
3.8.3 Income to Labor: Gaps 179
3.8.4 Key Percentiles and Rankings 182
4 MACRO-ACCESSIBILITY IN SOUTH AFRICA 202
4.1 Executive Summary 202
4.2 Economic Fundamentals and Dynamics 202
4.2.1 Regional Role 202
4.2.2 Franchising Activities 203
4.2.3 Spatial Development Initiatives (SDIs) 204
4.2.4 Infrastructure Development 205
4.2.5 Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) 206
4.3 Political Risks 207
4.3.1 Economic Relationship with the United States 207
4.3.2 Politics and the Business Environment 207
4.3.3 The Political System 207
4.4 Marketing Strategies 208
4.4.1 Distribution Channel Options 208
4.4.2 Agents and Distributors 210
4.4.3 Franchising Activities 211
4.4.4 Direct Marketing Options 211
4.4.5 Joint Ventures and Licensing Options 212
4.4.6 Creating a Sales Office 212
4.4.7 Selling Strategies 213
4.4.8 Advertising and Trade Promotion 214
4.4.9 Pricing Issues 218
4.4.10 Public Sector Marketing 219
4.4.11 Government Procurement 219
4.4.12 Intellectual Property Risks 221
4.4.13 Hiring Local Counsel 221
4.5 Import and Export Regulation Risks 222
4.5.1 Trade Barrier Risks 222
4.5.2 Valuations on Imports 223
4.5.3 Controls on Exports 223
4.5.4 Local Standards 224
4.6 Investment Climate 224
4.6.1 Openness to Foreign Investment 224
4.6.2 Conversion and Transfer Policies 226
4.6.3 Expropriation and Compensation 227
4.6.4 Dispute Settlement 227
4.6.5 Performance Requirements and Incentives 227
4.6.6 Government Procurement 228
4.6.7 Right to Private Ownership and Establishment 229
4.6.8 Protection of Property Rights 229
4.6.9 Transparency of the Regulatory System 230
4.6.10 Capital Market Risks 232
4.6.11 Political Violence 233
4.6.12 Corruption 233
4.6.13 Bilateral Investment Agreements 233
4.6.14 OPIC and Other Investment Insurance 234
4.6.15 Labor 234
4.7 Trade and Project Financing 235
4.7.1 The Banking System 235
4.7.2 Foreign Exchange Control Risks 236
4.7.3 General Financing Availability 236
4.7.4 Financing Export Strategies 237
4.7.5 Types of Available Export Financing 239
4.7.6 Multilateral Development Bank Offices 242
4.7.7 The World Bank 242
4.7.8 Banks with Correspondent Banking Arrangements 244
4.8 Travel Risks 245
4.8.1 Local Business Practices 245
4.8.2 Travel Issues 245
4.8.3 Infrastructure for Conducting Business 246
4.8.4 Country Data 248
4.9 Key Contacts 249
4.9.1 U.S. Embassy Trade-Related Contacts 249
4.9.2 Chambers of Commerce and Bilateral Business Councils 251
4.9.3 Trade and Industry Associations 252
4.9.4 South African Government Offices 254
4.9.5 Market Research Firms 258
4.9.6 Major Trade and Business Journals 259
4.9.7 South African Commercial Banks 260
4.9.8 Multilateral Development Bank Offices 261
5 DISCLAIMERS, WARRANTEES, AND USER AGREEMENT PROVISIONS 263
5.1 Disclaimers & Safe Harbor 263
5.2 Icon Group International, Inc. User Agreement Provisions 264

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