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Nanotechnology in Germany Product Image

Nanotechnology in Germany

  • Published: January 2008
  • Region: Germany
  • 86 Pages
  • Nanoposts.com

The German Government has supported nanotechnology since the 1980s, and Germany is now the leading player in nanotechnology in Europe in terms of funding, number of companies and dedicated research centres. Germany ranks among the top four nanotech locations worldwide. Germany ’s strengths include a well structured R&D infrastructure and a high level of research in the various subfields of nanotechnology. The industrial base for utilizing the results of this research is also in place.

Public nanotechnology funding in Germany is mainly distributed through the country’s network of research institutes–Fraunhofer, Max Planck, and Leibniz–and universities. German research institutions are global leaders in nanotech-related basic research. The institutes are an effective interface between basic research and industry, helping to transform basic research into applications. Funding bodies include the BMBF, research foundation DFG, the Fraunhofer Geselschaft and Max Planck institutes, the Volkswagen Foundation, and the German States.

According to the German government there are 1,000 plus companies active in the field, with an estimated EUR 420 million READ MORE >

1 INTRODUCTION
1.1 NANOTECHNOLOGY IN EUROPE
1.1.1 Funding
1.1.2 National programmes
1.1.3 Centres and infrastructure
1.1.4 Networks
1.1.5 Companies
1.2 NANOTECHNOLOGY IN ASIA-PACIFIC
1.2.1 Funding
1.2.2 National programmes
1.2.3 Centres and infrastructure
1.2.4 Networks
1.2.5 Companies
1.3 NANOTECHNOLOGY IN NORTH AMERICA
1.3.1 Funding
1.3.2 National programmes
1.3.2.1 State initiatives
1.3.3 Centres and infrastructure
1.3.4 Networks in North America
1.3.5 Companies
1.4 NANOTECHNOLOGY IN CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA
1.5 NANOTECHNOLOGY IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND AFRICA

2 COMMERCIALISING NANOTECHNOLOGY
2.1 INDUSTRY STRUCTURE
2.1.1 Suppliers
2.1.1.1 Materials
2.1.1.2 Tools and instrumentation
2.1.1.3 Devices and system integration
2.1.2 Buyers
2.1.3 New entrants
2.1.4 Substitution threats
2.1.5 Competition
2.2 KEY CHALLENGES
2.2.1 TECHNICAL
2.2.1.1 Understanding
2.2.1.2 Tools
2.2.2 MARKET
2.2.2.1 Hype
2.2.2.2 Cost
2.2.2.3 Production
2.2.2.4 Public Perception and Ethics
2.2.3 REGULATION
2.3 MARKET TRENDS AND DRIVERS
2.3.1 DRIVERS
2.3.2 TRENDS
2.3.2.1 Collaboration
2.3.2.2 First to market
2.3.2.3 Nanomaterials advantage
2.3.2.4 Improved products
2.3.2.5 Decreasing cost of nanomaterials
2.3.2.6 Autonomous systems

3 GERMANY
3.1 GOVERNMENT BODIES
3.1.1 Nano-Initiative-Aktionsplan 2010
3.1.2 Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWI)
3.1.3 Ministry of Science (BMBF)
3.1.4 German Federal Institute of Risk Assessment (BfR)
3.2 RESEARCH CENTRES
3.2.1 Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)
3.2.2 Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (MPG)
3.2.3 Leibniz Association (WGL)
3.2.4 Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft (FhG)
3.2.5 Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft (HGF)
3.2.6 Volkswagen Foundation
3.2.7 Centre for Advanced European Science and Research (CAESAR)
3.2.8 Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)
3.2.9 VDI
3.2.10 Charité
3.2.11 Other centres
3.3 NETWORKS
3.3.1 The competence networks
3.3.2 Other networks
3.4 UNIVERSITIES
3.4.1 Darmstadt University of Technology
3.4.2 Free University Berlin
3.4.3 Ludwig-Maximilians University
3.4.4 Technical University of Berlin
3.4.5 Technical University of Chemnitz
3.4.6 Technical University Kaiserlautern
3.4.7 Technical University Munich
3.4.8 RWTH Aachen University
3.4.9 University of Bochum
3.4.10 University of Hannover
3.4.11 University of Hamburg
3.4.12 University of Heidelberg
3.4.13 University of Kassel
3.4.14 University of Munich
3.4.15 University of Paderborn
3.4.16 University of Siegen
3.4.17 University of Ulm
3.5 COMPANIES
3.5.1 Nanomaterials and nanostructures
3.5.2 Tools and instrumentation

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