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Roads to Intelligent Transportation Systems: Assessment Technologies and Markets

  • ID: 992736
  • Report
  • May 2009
  • PracTel Inc
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Intelligent Transportation Systems make it possible to imagine a near future in which cars will be able to foresee and avoid collisions, navigate the quickest route to their destination, making use of up-to-the minute traffic reports, identify the nearest available parking slot and minimize their carbon emissions. The main motivation for ITS is the improvement of road safety. It is a startling fact that some 1.35 million people are estimated to die on the world’s roads each year, and over 35 million are injured.

Standards work in ITS have been ongoing for more than 30 years, including such organizations as ITU, ETSI, IEEE, and ISO.

ITS development, at the present time, mostly concentrated on a car itself; an exception is “intelligent” tolling. Symbiosis of car operation functions with enhancement supported by radar and telecommunications technologies seems to be a very effective way to construct a car as a part of ITS. The goal is to reduce probability of driver’s mistakes, which are the main cause of accidents. This goal can be achieved by putting a burden to analyze the road situation and to make decisions based on such an analysis on a computer. Such a computer is supported by radars for sensing the road situation and by telecommunications devices to communicate with other vehicles, intelligent road and law enforcement/emergency personnel.

This report addresses ITS telecommunications and radar technologies and related markets.

A. The report analyzes technologies and markets for CDPS – Collision Detection and Prevention Systems. They include RCDPS –Radar CDPS and CCDPS – Communications CDPS. Devices, which belong to different classes, can work either independently, or together, supporting each other.

This report shows that both classes of the devices were adopted from other industries, namely radar and telecommunications. This adoption requires a lot of adjustment and design of the systems specific for the car collision prevention application. The report analyzes the CDPS market and provides a market forecast for 2009-2013. The analysis is based on the author’s model of the market and the use of publicly available information as well as on the results of interviews with vendors.

B. This report also addresses marketing and technological issues of specific wireless technologies for ITS. Particular, the following evolving technologies and specific projects were considered:

1. 5.9 GHz DSRC- This technology, as it seen today, may eventually replace the 915 MHz DSRC in the U.S. and the 5.8 GHz DSRC in Europe. 5.9 GHz DSRC is the emerging communication technology that offers standardized ITS products and benefits in national large-scale deployments. U.S. DOT and the automotive OEMs will be the strategic players making deployment decisions in the 2009-2010 timeframe; though large-scale projects are expected only in the 2014-2015 time frame. 5.9 GHz
DSRC systems provide a significant enhancement in communication capabilities over all
previous ITS systems. DSRC will support multiple uses in vehicle / public safety and
commercial applications that cannot be achieved today. DSRC is a cost-effective
communication service, especially when compared with current cellular and satellite systems.

2. CALM (Continuous Air-interface, Long and Medium Range) represents an ambitious attempt to provide a platform for a wide range of future communications requirements for ITS. As such, it cuts across several ongoing standards-making efforts, including those of the ITU (like NGN). The aim of CALM is to provide wide area communications to support ITS applications that work equally well on a variety of different network platforms, including 2G (GSM/GPRS), 3G (IMT-2000), 4G (IMT Advanced); as well as satellite, microwave, mm-wave, infrared, WiMax and short - range technologies like WiFi.

3. The report also concentrates on the analysis of multiple ITS networking projects that are conducting in various parts of the world. These projects, which are organized by the industry and governmental agencies with participation of standard organizations (such as ETSI, CEN, IEEE and other) are testing various technologies to find and define optimal ways to enhance ITS with reliable means of communications. It seems that 5.9 GHz DSRC is in the wining position to be used for many ITS applications-it was recently approved for use in Europe (though Japan and some other countries utilize different technologies). CALM is coming into the play as an “universal platform” allowing utilization of a set of wireless protocols.

The report also provides marketing statistics for some of the discussed technologies.

Target Audience

This report is important to a wide population of researches, technical and sales staff involved in the developing of high-speed wireless services and products for transportation. It is recommended for both service providers and vendors that are working with related technologies. The report also helps to understand issues associated with relationship between ITS wireless communications and other technologies.

Research Methodology:

Considerable research was done using the Internet. Information from various Web sites was studied and analyzed. Evaluation of publicly available marketing and technical publications was conducted. Telephone conversations and interviews were held with industry analysts, technical experts and executives. In addition to these interviews and primary research, secondary sources were used to develop a more complete mosaic of the market landscape, including industry and trade publications, conferences and seminars.

The overriding objective throughout the work has been to provide valid and relevant information. This has led to a continual review and update of the information content.
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FEATURED COMPANIES

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  • Honda
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  • TechnoCom
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1.0 INTRODUCTION
1.1 Goal
1.2 Scope
1.3 Research Methodology
1.4 Target Audience 2

2.0 INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS
2.1 General
2.2 History: U.S.
2.3 ITS Architecture: U.S.
2.3.1 Global ITS Development
2.4 Technologies
2.5 ITS Applications
2.6 National Transportation Communications for ITS Protocol (NTCIP)

3.0 5.9 GHZ DSRC BASIS
3.1 General
3.2 IEEE 802.11p
3.2.1 General
3.2.2 Objectives and Status
3.2.2.1 ASTM Standard
3.2.3 5.9 GHz Transmission Advantages
3.2.4 Major Features
3.3 IEEE 1609
3.3.1 General
3.3.2 Overview
3.3.3 IEEE 1609 in Use

4.0 5.9 GHZ DSRC DEVELOPMENT
4.1 History
4.2 Equipment
4.3 Details: Dedicated Short Range Communications
4.4 Channel Designation
4.5 Place
4.6 Applications
4.7 DSRC (5.9 GHz) Transmission Characteristics (U.S.)
4.8 DSRC at Work
4.8.1 Service Categories
4.8.2 Requirements: DSRC
4.9 Regulation
4.9.1 Licensing
4.10 Comparison

5.0 DSRC WORLDWIDE STANDARD ACTIVITY
5.1 General
5.2 Process

6.0 5.9 GHZ DSRC BENEFITS AND LIMITATIONS
6.1 General
6.1.2 Toll Industry Benefits
6.2 Limitations

7.0 RFID AND DSRC: SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES

8.0 MARKET
8.1 Market Drivers
8.2 Market Requirements
8.3 Data
8.4 Market Estimate

9.0 DSRC VENDORS
Arinc
Kapsch
Mark IV
Oki
Q-Free
Raytheon
Savari
Sirit
TransCore
TechnoCom

10.0 CALM: CONTINUOUS AIR-INTERFACE, LONG AND MEDIUM RANGE
10.1 Goals
10.1.1 Vehicle- Infrastructure
10.2 Specifics
10.3 ISO TC 204 WG 16
10.3.1 IPv6 and NEMO
10.4 CALM: International Efforts
10.5 CALM: Applications
10.6 Issues

11.0 CEN
11.1 General
11.2 CEN and ITS

12.0 ETSI

13.0 IETF

14.0 PREVENT

15.0 ACTIVITY-MAJOR WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS-RELATED ITS PROJECTS

16.0 COMPANIES
EFKON AG
G.E.A
IRD
Inrix
PhyChips
Thales

17.0 CDPS-COLLISION DETECTION AND PREVENTION SYSTEMS
17.1 General
17.2 Need for CDPS
17.3 Why CDPS
17.4 Classification
17.5 Current View
17.5.1 History and Systems Examples
17.6 CDPS Classifications
17.6.1 Functional Classification
17.6.1.1 Advisory Collision Avoidance Systems
17.6.1.2 Collision Warning Systems
17.6.1.3 Automated Crash Avoidance Systems
17.6.2 CDPS based on Crash Type
17.6.2.1 Single Vehicle Road Departure
17.6.2.2. Collisions at Intersections
17.7 Benefits
17.8 Issues
17.9 Technology
17.9.1 General
17.9.2 The CDPS Evolution Process
17.9.3 Technological Structure
17.9.3.1 General
17.9.4 RCDPS
17.9.4.1 Types
17.9.4.2 Structures
17.9.4.2.1 Standards
17.9.4.3 Frequency Bands
17.9.4.4 Radar: RF and Optical
17.9.4.5 Properties
17.9.4.6 Advances
17.9.4.7 Future Evolution
17.9.5 CCDPS
17.9.5.1 General
17.9.5.2 Structures
17.9.5.3 Global Positioning Satellites
17.9.5.4 CCDPS Informative
17.9.5.5 Do not Disturb
17.9.5.6 What CCDPS Can Do
17.9.5.7 “Collective” Car
17.9.5.8 Navigation
17.9.5.9 Telematics
17.9.5.9.1 General
17.9.5.9.2 Trends
17.10 Market
17.10.1 Market Drivers
17.10.1.1 OPEX and CAPEX Savings
17.10.1.2 Technological Factor
17.10.2 Market Specifics
17.10.3 Market Barriers
17.10.4 Market Forecast
17.10.4.1 Model Assumptions
17.10.4.2 CDPS Market Size Estimate
17.10.4.3 Market Segmentation
17.11 CDPS Technical-Economical Characteristics: Summary
17.11.1 RCDPS
17.11.2 CCDPS
17.11.3 Pricing
17.12 Market Players
Advantech
Arinc
Autoliv
Cambridge Consultants, Ltd
Cambridge Systematics
DENSO
Chrysler (Bankrupt as of April 2009)
Continental
Delphi Corporation
Eaton Corp.
Georgia Institute of Technology
Hitachi
Honda
Intergraph
Iteris
M/A Com - TYCO Electronics (The Division was acquired by Autoliv in 2008)
Microsoft
Mitsubishi
Motorola
NEC
Satellite Security Systems
Siemens
Tenet (Envitia)
Toyota
TRW (Northrop Grumman)
Valeo Raytheon
Volkswagen
Visteon

18.0 CONCLUSIONS

APPENDIX:

APPENDIX I: ISO ITS Standards
APPENDIX II: ITS-related National and International Standards
APPENDIX III: ITS - Comparison of Wireless Communications Standards

LIST OF FIGURES:

Figure 1: Wireless Communications: ITS Environment
Figure 2: ITS Architecture
Figure 3: NTCIP Structure
Figure 4: Communications Model: WAVE
Figure 5: 5.9 GHz DSRC: Spectrum Allocation Details
Figure 6: Channel Assignment
Figure 7: Major Categories-5.9 GHz DSRC Services
Figure 8: Collision Detection/Avoidance System
Figure 9: Work Zone Warning
Figure 10: “Smart” Car
Figure 11: 5.9 GHz DSRC Rate vs. Distance
Figure 12: Logical Flow
Figure 13: DSRC Frequencies Planning
Figure 14: 5.9 GHz DSRC Program Schedule
Figure 15: N.A. 5.9 GHz DSRC Program
Figure 16: Addressable Market NA: 5.9 GHz DSRC Tag Sale ($M)
Figure 17: Addressable Market NA: 5.9 GHz DSRC Tags Sale (Unit 000)
Figure 18: Addressable Market NA: 5.9 GHz DSRC Readers Sale (Unit 000)
Figure 19: Addressable Market NA: 5.9 GHz DSRC Readers Sale ($M)
Figure 20: CALM: Infrastructure-Vehicle
Figure 21: CALM Architecture
Figure 22: Modern Car Collision Avoidance
Figure 23: CDPS Addressable Market ($B)
Figure 24: Proportion: RCDPS and CCDPS (%) 2008 View
Figure 25: Proportion: RCDPS and CCDPS (%) 2013 View
Figure 26: CDPS Market Geographic (2009) as % of Manufactured Cars

LIST OF TABLES:

Table 1: 5.9 GHz DSRC U.S. Characteristics
Table 2: Events Priorities
Table 3: Requirements
Table 4: Service-related Characteristics
Table 5: 915 MHz and 5.9 GHz DSRC Differences
Table 6: Summary Standards; 5.9 GHz DSRC
Table 7: 5.9 GHz DSRC Advantages
Table 8: DSRC Benefits
Table 9: CALM-WG16
Table 10: ETSI ITS-related Standards
Table 11: Statistics
Table 12: CDPS Use
Table 1: 5.9 GHz DSRC U.S. Characteristics
Table 2: Events Priorities
Table 3: Requirements
Table 4: Service-related Characteristics
Table 5: 915 MHz and 5.9 GHz DSRC Differences
Table 6: Summary Standards; 5.9 GHz DSRC
Table 7: 5.9 GHz DSRC Advantages
Table 8: DSRC Benefits
Table 9: CALM-WG16
Table 10: ETSI ITS-related Standards
Table 11: Statistics
Table 12: CDPS Use
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- Advantech

- Arinc

- Autoliv

- Cambridge Consultants, Ltd

- Cambridge Systematics

- DENSO

- Chrysler (Bankrupt as of April 2009)

- Continental

- Delphi Corporation

- Eaton Corp.

- Georgia Institute of Technology

- Hitachi

- Honda

- Intergraph

- Iteris

- M/A Com - TYCO Electronics (The Division was acquired by Autoliv in 2008)

- Microsoft

- Mitsubishi

- Motorola

- NEC

- Satellite Security Systems

- Siemens

- Tenet (Envitia)

- Toyota

- TRW (Northrop Grumman)

- Valeo Raytheon

- Volkswagen

- Visteon

- EFKON AG

- G.E.A

- IRD

- Inrix

- PhyChips

- Thales

- Arinc

- Kapsch

- Mark IV

- Oki

- Q-Free

- Raytheon

- Savari

- Sirit

- TransCore

- TechnoCom
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
5 of 5
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
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