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Thin-Film, Organic and Printable Photovoltaics: 2007-2015 Product Image

Thin-Film, Organic and Printable Photovoltaics: 2007-2015

  • ID: 662090
  • August 2007
  • 92 Pages
  • NanoMarkets

A report was released in early 2006 that examined and quantified the emerging market for thin film/flexible photovoltaic technology. It examined the virtues and disadvantages or rival research programs, such as silicon on metal, CIGS on metal and organic PV and compared the various strategies being employed to create new PV products for the mobile computer and communications, building materials, outdoor power, emergency power and other sectors. The report provided detailed forecasts of PV shipments broken out by technology type and application. It also discussed how far this new type of photovoltaics would eat into traditional photovoltaics markets.

This new report offers a fresh assessment of the space with additional details on technology, material and applications, a new market forecast as well as analysis of the strategies of leading firms active in this space. The materials platforms covered in this report include silicon, CIGS, polymers, small molecules, CdTe, and GaAs as well as various hybrid materials strategies. We also discuss emerging PV technology based on nanotechnology and so-called Third-generation Photovoltaics. Each of these technologies arereviewed in terms READ MORE >

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Executive Summary

- Thin Film, Organic and Printable Photovoltaics: The Opportunities
-- Applications and Markets
-- TF PV and Global Energy Markets
- Thin-Film, Organic and Printable Photovoltaics: The Risks
-- Will Silicon Abundance Hurt the TF PV Business?
-- How Long Will the PV Boom Last?
-- Other Concerns
- Firms To Watch

Chapter One: Introduction

- Background to Report
-- Thin-Film Photovoltaics: Low-Cost, Low-Weight
-- Where Thin-Film Photovoltaics Fits in the Marketplace
-- Uncertainties and Challenges
- Objectives and Scope of this Report
- Methodology of this Report
- Plan of this Report

Chapter Two: Thin-Film Technology, Materials and Production Strategies

- Evolution and Current State of Photovoltaics Markets
- Amorphous Silicon
-- Evolution of Manufacturing Processes for Amorphous Silicon PV
-- Performance and Expected Improvements
-- Other Forms of Silicon TF PV
-- Manufacturers of Amorphous Silicon PV
- CIS/CIGS
-- Evolution of Manufacturing Processes for CIS/CIGS
-- Performance and Expected Improvements
-- Manufacturers of CIGS PV
- CdTe
-- Evolution of Manufacturing Processes for CdTe
-- Performance and Expected Improvements
-- Manufacturers of CdTe PV
- Organic PV
-- Evolution of Materials and Manufacturing Processes for Organic PV
-- Performance and Expected Improvements
-- Manufacturers of Organic PV
- Other Materials Used for TF PV
-- Silicon Inks and Nanocrystalline Silicon
-- Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanomaterials
-- Conventional Compound Semiconductors
-- Encapsulation and Barrier Materials
- New Directions for Production: The Role of Printing

Chapter Three: Markets for Thin-Film Photovoltaics

- Introduction: Drivers for the Thin-Film PV Market
-- The Basic Value Proposition of TF PV
-- TF PV, Geography and Public Policy
-- Ability to Create New Products
- Large Projects and Central Generation
- Building Integrated Systems
-- TFPV and Rooftop Systems
-- TFPV and Smart Windows
- Consumer Electronics
- Military and Emergency Applications
- Other Applications

Chapter Four: Eight-Year Forecasts of Thin-Film, Organic and Printable PV

- Forecasting Methodology
-- Data Sources
-- Forecasting in a Hyper-Growth Market and Alternative Scenarios
-- Scope of Forecast
-- Other Factors Taken into Consideration in the Forecast
-- How Much Confidence Should You Have in These Forecasts?
-- Comparison with Previous NanoMarkets Forecasts
- Forecasts of Thin-Film, Organic and Printable PV Markets by Applications
-- Forecast of Thin-Film Share of Worldwide PV Market
- Forecasts of Application Revenue Broken Out by Material
-- a-Si
-- CIS/CIGS
-- CdTe
-- Organic and Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Materials
-- Other Materials
- Summaries of Eight-Year Thin-Film Film Market Forecasts by Materials
- Summaries of Eight-Year Thin-Film Film Market Forecasts by Applications
- Forecast of PV Markets by Production Technology
- Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in this Report

- About the Author

List of Exhibits

Exhibit E-1: Claimed Advantages of Thin-Film Approaches
Exhibit E-2: Opportunities for TF PV
Exhibit E-3: Summary of Thin-Film Photovoltaics Markets by Application ($ Million)
Exhibit 2-1: List of Materials Used for PV
Exhibit 2-2: Selected Firms Active in the a-Si PV Market
Exhibit 2-3: Firms Active in the CIS/CIGS PV Market
Exhibit 2-4: Organic PV Firms
Exhibit 4-1: Alternative Scenarios for the Evolution of Thin-Film Photovoltaics
Exhibit 4-2: Eight-Year Forecasts of TF PV Market Penetration
Exhibit 4-3: Worldwide Production of a-Si Photovoltaics
Exhibit 4-4: Breakout of a-Si Photovoltaics Revenue by Application ($ Millions)
Exhibit 4-5: Worldwide Production of CIS/CIGS Photovoltaics
Exhibit 4-6: Breakout of CIS/CIGS Photovoltaics Revenue by Application ($ Millions)
Exhibit 4-7: Short-Term Expansion of CdTe TF PV Capacity
Exhibit 4-8: Worldwide Production of CdTe Photovoltaics
Exhibit 4-9: Breakout of CdTe Photovoltaics Revenue by Application ($ Million)
Exhibit 4-10: Worldwide Production of Organic and Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaics
Exhibit 4-11: Breakout of Organic and Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaics Revenue by Application ($ Million)
Exhibit 4-12: Worldwide Production of "Other" Thin-Film Photovoltaics
Exhibit 4-13: Breakout of "Other" Thin-Film Photovoltaics Revenue by Application ($ Million)
Exhibit 4-14: Summary of Thin-Film Photovoltaics Shipments by Material ($ Million)
Exhibit 4-15: Summary of Thin-Film Photovoltaics Shipments by Material ( MW)
Exhibit 4-16: Summary of Thin-Film Photovoltaics Markets by Application ($ Million)
Exhibit 4-17: Summary of Thin-Film Photovoltaics Markets by Production Technology ($ Million)

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Chapter One: Introduction
1.1 Background to Report
There are many reasons to believe that thin-film photovoltaics (TF PV) have a prosperous future ahead of it. Most obviously, TF PV can be categorized as clean tech, one of the hottest (and perhaps over-hyped) areas for investment right now and one that feeds into the many energy and environmental concerns of government and public alike. Manufacturers of TF PV have some special reasons to cheer. TF PV has been capturing a growing share of the PV market for several years now and the evidence is that the parts of the PV market that it is attacking are precisely those parts that may provide the highest margins; sophisticated building integrated systems or solar chargers for mobile devices, for example. This is quite a turnaround. Until recently, TF PV has mostly been associated with the little strips of PV cells that power up calculators; not exactly an opportunity in the making.

E.1.1 Thin-Film Photovoltaics: Low-Cost, Low-Weight
As TF PV moves well beyond the solar calculator what it brings to a larger marketplace is a combination of low-cost and low-weight. The low-cost may reflect the cost of materials; not so much the cost of materials on a per unit basis, but rather that less materials are used in a thin film than in silicon "blocks" associated with conventional PV. But the low-cost also increasingly reflects new manufacturing processes that employ roll-to-roll (R2R) and printing technology.

These new processes not only promise cost reductions, but also the creation of entirely new PV products on flexible substrates or ones in which PV functionality is embedded in building materials; window glass and roof tiles being the ones most talked about. The fact that TF PV is also much lighter than conventional PV is also a key advantage in that it makes PV panels that use thin films much easier to install on roofs and walls. Where a lot of panels need to be installed on a roof, using TF PV reduces the likelihood that the roof will have to be specially reinforced.

Functional advantages that can be attributed to TF PV vary with the material being used. Some materials seem to be better suited than others to printing or for use indoors, for example. Manufacturers of organic TF PV solutions in particular have become fond of stressing the ability of their materials to provide such capabilities as flexibility or transparency; the latter so that TF PV can be embedded in windows. Often, however, this emphasis is meant to offset the fact that the materials being used have low energy conversion efficiencies when compared to conventional forms of PV.

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown

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