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Functional Materials for Future Electronics: Metals, Inorganic & Organic Compounds, Graphene, CNT - Product Image

Functional Materials for Future Electronics: Metals, Inorganic & Organic Compounds, Graphene, CNT

  • ID: 2495698
  • Report
  • November 2016
  • Region: Global
  • 197 Pages
  • IDTechEx
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Specialist Chemicals And Materials Will Reach Over $50 Billion In 2023

The chemistry of the new electronics and electrics is key to its future, whether it is invisible, tightly rollable, biodegradable, edible, employing the memristor logic of the human brain or possessing any other previously- impossible capability in a manufactured device. De-risking that material development is vital yet the information on which to base that has been unavailable. No more.

See how the metals aluminium, copper and silver are widely deployed, sometimes in mildly alloyed, nano, precursor, ink or other form. Understand the 12 basic compounds most widely used in the new electronics and electrics and compare them with compounds exhibiting the broadest range of appropriate electrical and optical functions for the future. Those seeking low volume, premium priced opportunities can learn of other broad opportunities. Indeed, we cover in detail all the key inorganic and organic compounds and carbon isomers. We show how the element silicon has a new and very different place beyond the silicon chip. Learn how the tailoring of a chosen, widely-applicable chemical can permit premium pricing and barriers to entry based on strong new intellectual property. For example, see which of 15 basic formulations are used in the anode or cathode of the re-invented lithium-ion batteries of 131 manufacturers and what comes next.

We identify 37 families of new and rapidly-evolving electronic and electric device, spanning nano to very large devices. Most chemical and material companies wish to de-risk their investment by finding common formulations across this new business that has a potential of over $50 billion for them. This will reduce R&D cost and provide escape routes to sell their current formulations elsewhere if they prove unsuccessful in the first application addressed. Indeed, the biggest markets for new and reinvented electrical and electronic devices may get commoditised first or collapse suddenly, leaving the materials suppliers high and dry. Read this report to avoid such a fate.

Who should buy this report?

All advanced chemical and material manufacturers and developers - both chemical companies and equipment manufacturers with deep vertical integration.

To a lesser extent those making the devices and key circuit technologies such as printed electronics, organic electronics, wide area electrics and very high volume electronics. Smart packaging. Smart labels. Investors and acquirors in these industries, particularly in advanced chemical and material manufacturers and developers. Academics and research centers covering advanced chemicals and materials for electronics and electrics. Particularly huge opportunity in Japan, Germany and USA.

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1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
1.1. The most important materials by three criteria
1.2. Chemical giants reposition to benefit
1.2.1. Itochu and partners
1.2.2. BASF and partners
1.2.3. Dow and others
1.3. Need for de-risking
1.4. The most widely useful compounds
1.4.1. Many examples analysed
1.4.2. Possible future importance of the chemistry of iron
1.5. The most versatile compounds electronically
1.6. Disruptive new electronics and electrics - the market pull
1.7. Fine metals and semiconductors that will be most widely used - survey result
1.8. Fine inorganic compounds most widely needed - survey results
1.9. The inorganic compounds - detailed results for 37 families of device
1.10. Allotropes of carbon most widely needed - survey result
1.11. Fine organic compounds most widely needed - survey results
1.12. Survey results for lithium salts in the biggest battery market
1.13. Less prevalent or less established formulations
1.13.1. Tantalum oxide catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells
1.13.2. Tungsten chemistry: new uses
1.14. Structural electronics
1.15. Double helix structure discovered in an inorganic material - November 2016

2. INTRODUCTION
2.1. Elements being targeted
2.2. Here come composites and mixtures
2.3. Disparate value propositions
2.4. Here comes printing
2.5. Great breadth
2.6. Fragile chemicals
2.7. Challenges of ink formulation
2.8. Company size is not a problem
2.9. Uncertainties
2.10. Inorganic vs organic
2.11. Impediments
2.12. Photovoltaics
2.13. Examples of company activity
2.13.1. Dow Chemical
2.13.2. Merck, DuPont and Honeywell
2.13.3. Bayer
2.14. Progress with Semiconductors
2.15. Printed and multilayer electronics and electrics needs new design rules
2.16. Metamaterials, nantennas and memristors
2.17. The toolkit becomes large
2.17.1. Three dimensional
2.17.2. Leveraging smart substrates
2.17.3. Planned applications can have plenty of area
2.17.4. Health and environment to the fore
2.17.5. Three generations?

3. THE MOST IMPORTANT EMERGING DEVICES AND THEIR REQUIREMENTS
3.1. Conductive patterning: antennas, electrodes, interconnects, metamaterials
3.1.1. Silver flake inks continue to reign supreme for printing
3.1.2. Alternatives gain share
3.1.3. ITO Replacement
3.1.4. 2D titanium carbide
3.1.5. For RFID Tags
3.1.6. For logic and memory
3.1.7. For sensors
3.1.8. For smart packaging
3.1.9. For memristors
3.2. CIGS Photovoltaics
3.2.1. Brief description of technology
3.3. DSSC Photovoltaics
3.3.1. Brief description of technology
3.4. Electrophoretic displays and alternatives
3.4.1. Brief description of the technology
3.4.2. Applications of E-paper displays
3.4.3. E ink
3.4.4. The Killer Application
3.4.5. SiPix, Taiwan
3.4.6. Alternatives - electrowetting
3.5. Inorganic LED
3.6. Li-ion battery rechargeable
3.7. Rechargeable lithium/lithium metal battery and PEM fuel cell
3.8. MEMS & NEMS
3.9. Organic Light Emitting Diode OLED displays and lighting
3.10. Power semiconductors
3.11. Supercapacitor
3.11.1. View of rollout of graphene based devices
3.12. Supercabattery
3.13. Touch screen
3.13.1. Main Touch Technologies
3.13.2. Leading Market Applications
3.13.3. ITO Alternatives for touch screens
3.13.4. Over 100 profiled organizations
3.13.5. Transistor, diode, thermistor, thyristor for electronics
3.13.6. Tungsten chemistry: new uses
3.14. Structural electronics
3.15. Other devices of interest
3.16. New material formats will lead to new devices

4. CARBON NANOTUBES AND GRAPHENE
4.1. Carbon nanotubes
4.2. Graphene
4.2.1. Graphene could reduce weight of batteries for electric vehicles
4.3. Carbon nanotubes and graphene summary
4.4. 113 organizations profiled

5. INDIUM COMPOUNDS IN THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS
5.1. More than the story of ITO
5.2. Key in the newer light emitting devices
5.3. Quantum dots and FETs
5.4. Cost and printability are challenges
5.5. Oxide semiconductor with a new elemental composition

6. TITANIUM COMPOUNDS IN THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS
6.1. Piezoelectrics, energy harvesters, supercapacitors, displays and sensors
6.2. Allied topic photocatalysis

7. ZINC COMPOUNDS FOR THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS
7.1. Dielectric for insulation, capacitors and other devices
7.2. Improving the efficiency of UV LED

8. FLUORINE COMPOUNDS FOR THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS
8.1. "Rechargeable lithium", alkali metal fluorides and other fluorine chemistry
8.2. Fluoropolymer for solution-based OFET processing
8.3. Other New Fluoropolymer Applications in 2015-6

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