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Functional Materials for Future Electronics: Metals, Inorganic & Organic Compounds, Graphene, CNT - Product Image

Functional Materials for Future Electronics: Metals, Inorganic & Organic Compounds, Graphene, CNT

  • ID: 2495698
  • July 2014
  • Region: Global
  • 183 Pages
  • IDTechEx
Specialist Chemicals And Materials Will Reach Over $50 Billion In 2023

The chemistry of the new electronics and electrics is key to its future, whether it is invisible, tightly rollable, biodegradable, edible, employing the memristor logic of the human brain or possessing any other previously- impossible capability in a manufactured device. De-risking that material development is vital yet the information on which to base that has been unavailable. No more.

See how the metals aluminium, copper and silver are widely deployed, sometimes in mildly alloyed, nano, precursor, ink or other form. Understand the 12 basic compounds most widely used in the new electronics and electrics and compare them with compounds exhibiting the broadest range of appropriate electrical and optical functions for the future. Those seeking low volume, premium priced opportunities can learn of other broad opportunities. Indeed, we cover in detail all the key inorganic and organic compounds and carbon isomers. We show how the element silicon has a new and very different place beyond the silicon chip. Learn how the tailoring of a chosen, widely-applicable chemical can permit premium pricing and barriers to entry based on strong new intellectual property. For example, see which READ MORE >

Specialist Chemicals And Materials Will Reach Over $50 Billion In 2023

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
1.1. The most important materials by three criteria
1.2. Chemical giants reposition to benefit
1.2.1. Itochu and partners
1.2.2. BASF and partners
1.2.3. Dow and others
1.3. Need for de-risking
1.4. The most widely useful compounds
1.4.1. Many examples analysed
1.4.2. Possible future importance of the chemistry of iron
1.5. The most versatile compounds electronically
1.6. Disruptive new electronics and electrics - the market pull
1.7. Fine metals and semiconductors that will be most widely used - survey result
1.8. Fine inorganic compounds most widely needed - survey results
1.9. The inorganic compounds - detailed results for 37 families of device
1.10. Allotropes of carbon most widely needed - survey result
1.11. Fine organic compounds most widely needed - survey results
1.12. Survey results for lithium salts in the biggest battery market
1.13. Less prevalent or less established formulations
1.14. Tantalum oxide catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

2. INTRODUCTION
2.1. Elements being targeted
2.2. Here come composites and mixtures
2.3. Disparate value propositions
2.4. Here comes printing
2.5. Great breadth
2.6. Fragile chemicals
2.7. Challenges of ink formulation
2.8. Company size is not a problem
2.9. Uncertainties
2.10. Inorganic vs organic
2.11. Impediments
2.12. Photovoltaics
2.13. Examples of company activity
2.13.1. Dow Chemical
2.13.2. Merck, DuPont and Honeywell
2.13.3. Bayer
2.14. Progress with Semiconductors
2.15. Printed and multilayer electronics and electrics needs new design rules
2.16. Metamaterials, nantennas and memristors
2.17. The toolkit becomes large
2.17.1. Three dimensional
2.17.2. Leveraging smart substrates
2.17.3. Planned applications can have plenty of area
2.17.4. Health and environment to the fore
2.17.5. Three generations?

3. THE MOST IMPORTANT EMERGING DEVICES AND THEIR REQUIREMENTS
3.1. Conductive patterning: antennas, electrodes, interconnects, metamaterials
3.1.1. Silver flake inks continue to reign supreme for printing
3.1.2. Alternatives gain share
3.1.3. ITO Replacement
3.1.4. For RFID Tags
3.1.5. For logic and memory
3.1.6. For sensors
3.1.7. For smart packaging
3.1.8. For memristors
3.2. CIGS Photovoltaics
3.2.1. Brief description of technology
3.3. DSSC Photovoltaics
3.3.1. Brief description of technology
3.4. Electrophoretic displays and alternatives
3.4.1. Brief description of the technology
3.4.2. Applications of E-paper displays
3.4.3. E ink
3.4.4. The Killer Application
3.4.5. SiPix, Taiwan
3.4.6. Alternatives - electrowetting
3.5. Inorganic LED
3.6. Li-ion battery rechargeable
3.7. Rechargeable lithium/lithium metal battery and PEM fuel cell
3.8. MEMS & NEMS
3.9. Organic Light Emitting Diode OLED displays and lighting
3.10. Power semiconductors
3.11. Supercapacitor
3.11.1. View of rollout of graphene based devices
3.12. Supercabattery
3.13. Touch screen
3.13.1. Main Touch Technologies
3.13.2. Leading Market Applications
3.13.3. ITO Alternatives for touch screens
3.13.4. Over 100 profiled organizations
3.14. Transistor, diode, thermistor, thyristor for electronics
3.15. Other devices of interest
3.16. New material formats will lead to new devices

4. CARBON NANOTUBES AND GRAPHENE
4.1. Carbon Nanotubes
4.2. Graphene
4.2.1. Graphene could reduce weight of batteries for electric vehicles
4.3. Carbon Nanotubes and graphene summary
4.4. 113 Organizations profiled

5. INDIUM COMPOUNDS IN THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS
5.1. More than the story of ITO
5.2. Key in the newer light emitting devices
5.3. Quantum dots and FETs
5.4. Cost and printability are challenges
5.5. Oxide semiconductor with a new elemental composition

6. TITANIUM COMPOUNDS IN THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS
6.1. Piezoelectrics, energy harvesters, supercapacitors, displays and sensors
6.2. Allied topic photocatalysis

7. ZINC COMPOUNDS FOR THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS
7.1. Dielectric for insulation, capacitors and other devices
7.2. Improving the efficiency of UV LED

8. FLUORINE COMPOUNDS FOR THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS
8.1. "Rechargeable lithium", alkali metal fluorides and other fluorine chemistry
8.2. Fluoropolymer for solution-based OFET processing

APPENDIX 1: SUPERCAPACITOR FLASH CHARGING OF ABB BUS
APPENDIX 2: IDTECHEX PUBLICATIONS AND CONSULTANCY

TABLES

1.1. Main achievements and objectives with supercapacitors and their derivatives by number of manufacturers and putative manufacturers involved
1.2. 2014 output value forecast by manufacturer of supercapacitors and supercabatteries.
1.3. Supercapacitor technology roadmap including lithium-ion capacitors (AEDLC) 2013-2024
1.4. The ten advances that will create the largest add-on markets for supercapacitors and their derivatives in order of importance in creating market value with examples of organisations leading the advance
1.5. 15 examples of component displacement by supercapacitors in 2012-3
1.6. Supercapacitor functions reaching major market acceptance 2013-2023 with some of the companies leading the success by sector
1.7. 80 manufacturers, putative manufacturers and commercial companies developing supercapacitors, supercabatteries and carbon-enhanced lead batteries for commercialisation with country, website and device technology.
2.2. Some of the pros and cons of supercapacitors
3.1. Advances that will create the largest add-on markets for supercapacitors and their derivatives by value in order of importance with examples of organisations leading the advance.
3.2. Examples of component displacement by supercapacitors.
4.1. Supercapacitor functions reaching major market acceptance 2013-2023 with some of the companies leading the success by sector
5.1. 80 manufacturers, putative manufacturers and commercial companies developing supercapacitors, supercabatteries and carbon-enhanced lead batteries for commercialisation with country, website and device technology.
6.1. By application, for Automotive, Aerospace, Military and Oil & Gas, the successes by 78 supercapacitor/supercabattery manufacturers in grey green and their targets for extra applications in the near term in yellow. Six sub categori
6.2. The successes in six categories in the Utility sector by 78 supercapacitor/supercabattery manufacturers in grey green and their targets for extra applications in the near term in yellow
6.3. The successes by 78 supercapacitor/supercabattery manufacturers in the Consumer and Industrial & Commercial beyond vehicles sectors in grey green and their targets for extra applications in the near term in yellow. Eight sub-categ
7.1. Pre-commercial supercapacitor developers with their country, website, industrial partner, applications targeted
8.1. Electrolytes used - acetonitrile solvent, other solvent or ionic liquid - by supercapacitor and lithium supercabattery manufacturers and putative manufacturers.
8.2. Electrode materials and formation processes for supercapacitors and supercabatteries

FIGURES

1.1. Some of the options and some of the suppliers in the spectrum between conventional capacitors and rechargeable batteries with primary markets shown in yellow
1.2. Examination of achievement and strategy in the most important applicational sectors. Number of manufacturers of supercapacitors and their variants that have that have supplied given sectors vs number that target them for future ex
1.3. Probable timeline for market adoption by sector and technical achievements driving the growth of the market for supercapacitors and their derivatives 2014-2025 with market value projections for supercapacitors, cost and performanc
1.4. Some of the main ways in which greater supercapacitor energy density is being sought by the route of increasing useful carbon area per unit volume or weight
1.5. The main functions that supercapacitors will perform over the coming decade
1.6. Examples of the main functions performed by supercapacitors
1.7. Main functions performed by supercapacitors in electric vehicles
1.8. The evolution from conventional to various types of electric vehicle related to supercapacitor applications in them today, where hybrids and pure electric versions are a primary target 1.9. Possible timeframe and technology for reaching the tipping point for sales of pure electric on-road cars
1.10. The number of manufacturers and putative manufacturers of supercapacitors/supercabatteries by six sub-categories of technology 1.11. Incidence of manufacturers of various types of supercapacitor and variant by operating principle
1.12. Component displacement mapped as a function of benefits relative to batteries conferred by supercapacitors
1.13. Estimate of the number of trading manufacturers of supercapacitors and supercabatteries globally 1993-2025 including timing of industry shakeout.
2.1. Types of capacitor 2.2. Symmetric supercapacitor EDLC left compared with asymmetric AEDLC ie supercabattery with battery-like cathode (ie part electrochemical in action) shown right. During charge and discharge, the voltage is nearly constant resulting i
2.3. Symmetric supercapacitor EDLC compared with asymmetric AEDLC ie supercabattery with lithiated carbon anode (ie entirely electrostatic in action) shown right
2.4. Eight families of option and some of the suppliers in the spectrum between conventional capacitors and rechargeable batteries with primary markets shown in yellow
3.1. The main functions that supercapacitors will perform over the coming decade
3.2. Examples of the main functions performed by supercapacitors. Those in black are currently only achieved with a flammable, carcinogenic electrolyte - acrylonitrile - but this will change
3.3. The evolution from conventional to various types of electric vehicle related to supercapacitor applications in them today, where hybrids and pure electric versions are a primary target.
3.4. Possible timeframe and technology for reaching the tipping point for sales of pure electric on-road cars
3.5. Component displacement mapped as a function of benefits relative to batteries conferred by supercapacitors
3.6. Siemens view in 2012 of the elements of Electrical Bus Rapid Transit eBRT, for example, mentioning U-Caps meaning supercapacitors
4.1. Examples of applications of the ULTIMO Cell
4.2. Structural supercapacitor as flexible film.
4.3. Primary demand for energy storage for battery-like products in Europe in 2020, which will be satisfied by batteries, supercapacitors, intermediate products and combinations of these 4.4. East Penn Deca Ultra Battery in Honda hybrid car
4.5. Heter Electronics supercapacitors from China
5.1. Incidence of the different technologies
5.2. Number of manufacturers offering the various supercapacitor technologies including derivatives, some companies having several options
5.3. Estimate of the number of trading manufacturers of supercapacitors and supercabatteries globally 1993-2025 including timing of industry shakeout. 9.1. UltrabatteryTM for medium hybrid vehicles 9.2. Inmatech Innovations
9.3. Supercapacitor market and Inmatech
9.4. Maxwell Technologies flat supercapacitor for mobile phones etc. exhibited at EVS26 Los Angeles
9.5. Nichicon supercapacitor emphasis at EVS26 Los Angeles 2012
9.6. Supercapacitor-based electric vehicle fast charging stations launched in 2012 by Nichicon.
9.7. Mazda car supercapacitor exhibited at EVS26 Los Angeles 2012
9.8. Nippon Chemi-Con low resistance DXE Series priority shown in 2012
9.9. Exhibit by United ChemiCon at EVS26 Los Angeles
10.1. Daikin Industries display on fluorination of supercapacitor electrolytes
10.2. Extracts from Hutchinson presentation at eCarTec Munich October 2012

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