Future Trends in Cyber Security

Future Trends in Cyber Security

Cybersecurity has become a top priority for enterprises. There were a number of high profile company breaches last year, with a recent IBM study putting the average cost of a data breach at $4 million.

With the emergence of cloud-based services and IoT, IT systems have become more vulnerable to cyber-attacks. Organizations require advanced data security solutions to prevent fraud and unauthorized payments, and keep track of the large volumes of data generated.

In today’s blog, we’re going to discuss the 5 cybersecurity trends that will dominate discussion in 2016.

1. Internet of Things (IoT)

The IoT is a network of physical devices that are interconnected through various network technologies. An increase in the number of these smart devices has led to a rise in sophisticated and complex threats and hacking activities.

The rising adoption of the bring your own device (BYOD) policy has made IoT more common within the enterprise environment. While there is no doubting the benefits IoT offers for enterprises, it has made it far more challenging for them to manage their data flow.

Enterprises must ensure sensitive data is encrypted, and that access is restricted. It’s important to be able to manage and block access to enterprise devices and networks when necessary.

However, it is not just enterprises that need to worry about the security risks brought on by the proliferation of IoT devices. Smart devices are even finding their way into our homes, and consumers are going to have to make a more concerted effort to protect themselves.

2. Cloud Services

Do you know where your data resides?

In Monday’s blog, we spoke about security expert Vincent Tan’s presentation at the Black Hat conference. He demonstrated how the EMS solutions being employed by enterprises are largely ineffective and in some cases can even expose an organization to unexpected risks.

As more and more of the services we use reside in the cloud, there is a real danger that we can lose control over our data. It is up to the consumer or enterprise to ensure their cloud services are secure. As Tan highlighted in his speech, we shouldn’t just trust third party vendors blindly. We should test and verify for ourselves.

3. Ransomware

The threat from ransomware is growing. This type of malware locks your computer, preventing you from accessing your files. It’s being used, quite successfully, by cybercriminals to extort money from large corporations by encrypting their important files and rendering the data inaccessible until a ransom is paid.

In a lot of cases, businesses find it much easier to simply pay the ransom and retrieve their data, than take other actions. We saw an increase in incidences of ransomware last year, and as long as it remains effective, hackers will continue to target small, medium and large enterprises.

4. Spear Phishing

Phishing attacks are the most common form of cyber attack, and they are growing more sophisticated over time. They come in the form of an official-looking email, website or communication masquerading as a trusted source. What they actually are is a way for cybercriminals to bypass your security systems and access your data.

More often than not, these messages lead to an infected website. Spear phishing is being used to steal your confidential data, your passwords, your bank account numbers. It’s important to have real-time monitoring and scanning systems to safeguard against attack.

5. New Technologies

New technologies create new opportunities for cybercriminals. Connected cars, for example, will be linked via the internet to other devices. This exposes them to a variety of threats, e.g. exploits of the telematics system to suppress the anti-theft-system or the injection of unauthorised software to control the brakes functionality.

Hackers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek have already demonstrated the ability to control the braking, steering and acceleration systems of a Jeep Cherokee, while it was travelling at speeds of up to 5MPH.

Wearables is another example of an IoT device that is not usually covered in an organization’s security strategy. While devices like smart watches may not be looked upon as a security risk, they will be susceptible to attack.

CONCLUSION

Cyber threats continue to grow in prevalence and sophistication. But new technologies are also creating more effective tools to help us protect ourselves from attacks.  For example, machine learning gives computers the ability to learn without being programmed. In theory, developments in AI should make it more difficult for hackers to bypass detection.

One thing is for certain, we will continue to monitor developments in this area. So check back with us over the coming months, or for more information and related documentation visit -  https://www.researchandmarkets.com/rm/HHKSK.                                    

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Published by Research and Markets

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