Making Sense of the Organization, Volume 2. The Impermanent Organization

  • ID: 1057326
  • Book
  • 310 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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The seeming permanence of organizations conceals an endless cycle of interruptions, recoveries, and re–organizing. This fundamental cycle is explored in a series of essays that focus on ways in which people organize their attention, interpretations, actions, and learning in order to cope with impermanence. Coping is explored in settings such as the spread of a puzzling virus, a foam strike on the space shuttle, excess deaths following pediatric surgery, wildland fires that suddenly explode, and the misidentification of fingerprints in a crime lab. Recovery from events such as these tends to be rough. The fixes made in the name of recovery tend to be transient and eventually give way to new interruptions, new challenges for sensemaking, and renewed efforts to reorganize. The purpose of these essays is to render the challenges less mysterious.
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Preface.

Acknowledgments.

PART I INTRODUCTION.

1. Organized Impermanence: An Overview.

2. Mundane Poetics: Searching for Wisdom in Organizational Theory.

3. Faith, Evidence, and Action: Better Guesses in an Unknowable World.

PART II ATTENDING.

4. Managing the Unexpected: Complexity as Distributed Sensemaking.

5. Information Overload Revisited (Kathleen M. Sutcliffe and Karl. E Weick).

6. Organizing for Mindfulness: Eastern Wisdom and Western Knowledge (Karl E. Weick and Ted Putnam).

PART III INTERPRETATION.

7. Making Sense of Blurred Images: Mindful Organizing in Mission STS–107.

8. Organizing and the Process of Sensemaking (Karl E. Weick, Kathleen M. Sutcliffe, and David Obstfeld).

9. Impermanent Systems and Medical Errors: Variety Mitigates Adversity.

PART IV ACTION.

10. Hospitals as Cultures of Entrapment: A Re–analysis of the Bristol Royal Infirmary (Karl E. Weick and Kathleen M. Sutcliffe).

11. Enacting an Environment: The Infrastructure of Organizing.

12. Positive Organizing and Organizational Tragedy.

PART V LEARNING AND CHANGE.

13. Emergent Change as a Universal in Organizations.

14. Drop Your Tools: An Allegory for Organizational Studies.

15. Leadership as the Legitimation of Doubt.

Epilogue.

References.

Index.

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Karl Weick is the Rensis Likert College Professor of Organizational Behavior and Psychology, and Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan.

He is one of the leading figures in the American Academy of Management and he is seen by many as one of the most influential thinkers and writers in the field.

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