Catalysis without Precious Metals

  • ID: 1444316
  • Book
  • 306 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Written for chemists in industry and academia, this ready reference and handbook summarizes recent progress in the development of new catalysts that do not require precious metals. The research thus presented points the way to how new catalysts may ultimately supplant the use of precious metals in some types of reactions, while highlighting the remaining challenges.

An essential copanion for organic and catalytic chemists, as well as those working with/on organometallics and graduate students.

From the contents:

∗ Catalysis Involving the H′ Transfer Reactions of First–Row Transition Metals

∗ Catalytic Reduction of Dinitrogen to Ammonia by Molybdenum Complexes

∗ Molybdenum and Tungsten Catalysts for Hydrogenation, Hydrosilylation and Hydrolysis

∗ Iron in Catalytic Alkene and Carbonyl Hydrogenation Reactions

∗ Olefin Oligomerizations and Polymerizations Catalyzed by Iron and Cobalt Complexes

∗ Cobalt and Nickel Catalyzed Reactions Involving C–H and C–N Activation Reactions

∗ Development of Molecular Electrocatalysts for H2 Oxidation and Production Based on Inexpensive Metals

∗ Nickel–Catalyzed Reductinve Couplings and Cyclizations

∗ Copper–Catalyzed Ligand Promoted Ullmann–Type Coupling Reactions

∗ Copper–Catalyzed Azide–Alkyne Cycloaddition

∗ "Frustrated Lewis Pairs": A Metal–Free Strategy for Hydrogenation Catalysis
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Preface

CATALYSIS INVOLVING THE H∗TRANSFER REACTIONS OF FIRST–ROW TRANSITION METALS

H∗Transfer Between M–H Bonds and Organic Radicals

H∗Transfer Between Ligands and Organic Radicals

H∗Transfer Between M–H and C–C Bonds

Chain Transfer Catalysis

Catalysis of Radical Cyclizations

Competing Methods for the Cyclization of Dienes

Summary and Conclusions

CATALYYTIC REDUCTION OF DINITROGEN TO AMMONIA BY MOLYBDENUM

Introduction

Some Characteristics of Triamidoamine Complexes

Possible [HIPTN3N]Mo Intermediates in a Catalytic Reduction of Molecular Nitrogen

Interconversion of Mo(NH3) and Mo(N2)

Catalytic Reduction of Dinitrogen

MoH and Mo(H2)

Ligand and Metal Variations

Comments

MOLYBDENUM AND TUNGSTEN CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGENATION, HYDROSILYLATION AND HYDROLYSIS

Introduction

Proton Transfer Reactions of Metal Hydrides

Hydride Transfer Reactdions of Metal Hydrides

Stoichiometric Hydride Transfer Reactivity of Anionic Metal Hydride Complexes

Catalytic Hydrogenation of Ketones with Anionic Metal Hydrides

Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones Using Metal Hydrides and Added Acid

Ionic Hydrogenations from Dihydrides: Delivery of the Proton and Hydride from One Metal

Catalytic Ionic Hydrogenations With Mo and W Catalysts

Mo Phosphine Catalysts With Improved Lifetimes

Tungsten Hydrogenation Catalysts with N–Heterocyclic Carbene Ligands

Catalysts for Hydrosilylation of Ketones

Cp2Mo Catalysts for Hydrolysis, Hydrogenations and Hydrations

Conclusion

MODERN ALCHEMY: REPLACING PRECIOUS METALS WITH IRON IN CATALYTIC ALKENE AND CARBONYL HYDROGENATION REACTIONS

Introduction

Alkene Hydrogenation

Carbonyl Hydrogenation

Outlook

OLEFIN OOLIGOMERIZATIONS AND POLYMERIZATIONS CATALYZED BY IRON AND COBALT COMPLEXES BEARING BIS(IMINO)PYRIDINE LIGANDS

Introduction

Precatalyst Synthesis

Precatalyst Activation and Catalysis

The Active Catalyst and Mechanism

Other Applications

Conclusions and Outlook

COBALT AND NICKEL CATALYZED REACTIONS INVOLVING C–H AND C–N ACTIVATION REACTIONS

Introduction

Catalysis with Cobalt

Catalysis with Nickel

A MODULAR APPROACH TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF MOLECULAR ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR H2 OXIDATION AND PRODUCTION BASED ON INEXPENSIVE METALS

Introduction

Concepts in Catalyst Design Based on Structural Studies of Hydrogenase Enzymes

A Layered or Modular Approach to Catalyst Design

Using the First Coordination Sphere to Control the Energies of Catalytic Intermediates

Using the Second Coordination Sphere to Control the Movement of Protons between the Metal and the Exterior of the Molecular Catalyst

Integration of the First and Second Coordination Spheres

Summary

NICKEL–CATALYZED REDUCTIVE COUPLINGS AND CYCLIZATIONS

Introduction

Couplings of Alkynes with alpha, beta–Unsaturated Carbonyls

Couplings of Alkynes with Aldehydes

Conclusions and Outlook

COPPER–CATALYZED LIGAND PROMOTED ULLMANN–TYPE COUPLING REACTIONS

Introduction

C–N Bond Formation

C–O Bond Formation

C–C Bond Formation

C–S Bond Formation

C–P Bond Formation

Conclusion

COPPER–CATALYZED LIGAND PROMOTED ULLMANN–TYPE COUPLING REACTIONS

Introduction

C–N Bond Formation

C–O Bond Formation

C–C Bond Formation

C–S Bond Formation

C–P Bond Formation

Conclusion

COPPER–CATALYZED AZIDE–ALKYNE CYCLOADDITION (CuAAC)

Introduction

Azide–Alkyne Cycloaddition: Basics

Copper–Catalyzed Cycloadditions

"FRUSTRATED LEWIS PAIRS": A METAL–FREE STRATEGY FOR HYDROGENATION CATALYSIS

Phosphine–Borane Activation of H2

"Frustrated Lewis Pairs"

Metal–Free Catalytic Hydrogenation

Future Considerations

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R. Morris Bullock
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