Construction Health and Safety in Developing Countries

  • ID: 1530388
  • Book
  • 81 pages
  • European Construction Institute ECI
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Developing countries accept the presence of foreign companies carrying out work within their borders for a number of reasons:

- as an inevitable consequence of globalisation, as the host country seeks to improve it’s socio-economic standing
- because their own companies do not have the resources to carry out the work
- to achieve technology transfer from the foreign companies to their own
- or they may be there as a condition of accepting aid money from an industrialised
country

Whatever the drivers, the result is that many large projects are carried out in developing countries by companies from industrialised nations. Some outstanding feats of engineering have been accomplished under these circumstances and are even more commendable considering the major physical and cultural environmental challenges that would have been present.

A number of issues emerge when encountering these challenges, which can lead to a lack of resources being available (eg. equipment to carry out the work, skilled workers and adequate road network for delivery of materials and workers to the site). It is inevitable that any work carried out that is under-resourced will put pressure on the effective management of health and safety.

This manual has been developed to assist those responsible for the management of health and safety. It is not the intention to explain what is different between countries that are industrially developed and those that are developing because this has been thoroughly researched elsewhere. The manual explains those physical characteristics of developing countries (infrastructure, security, politics and weather) along with the human elements (language, literacy, skills and local practices) that impact upon the construction process and the management of health and safety. The manual should also be of use to project management teams working in developed countries, but employing labour from other countries.

This manual has been written following a one-year research project at Loughborough University investigating the implications on health and safety of carrying out engineering and construction projects in developing countries.
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Foreword

SECTION 1.0 - INTRODUCTION 2
Why you need to manage differently
How this manual will help
1.1 Definitions
1.2

SECTION 2.0 - MAIN ISSUES
2.1 Infrastructure
2.2 Language
2.3 Literacy
2.4 Local Practices
2.5 Politics
2.6 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
2.7 Security
2.8 Use & Abuse of Equipment
2.9 Vocational Skills
2.10 Weather Extremes
2.11 Workers
2.12 Workers Families

SECTION 3.0 - CAMEOS & NOTES
Cameos
3.2 Local Practices
3.3 Personal Protective Equipment
3.4 Use & Abuse of Equipment
3.5 Security
Notes

SECTION 4.0 - ASSESSMENT TOOLS
4.1 Management Process
4.2 Assessment Tool
4.3 Cultural Understanding – Geert Hofstede
4.4 Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions
4.5 Country Data Sheets 51
Developing Countries
- Chile
- China
- India
- Indonesia
- Iraq
- Mexico
- Nigeria
- South Africa
4.5 Country Data Sheets
Developed Countries
- Belgium
- France
- U.K
- USA

SECTION 5.0 – EXPERT SURVEY
5.1 Expert Survey
5.2 Questionnaire Results

SECTION 6.0 – FURTHER INFORMATION
6.1 Recommended Reading
6.2 Useful Websites
6.3 Photograph Credits
6.4 References

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