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Nanoplatform–Based Molecular Imaging

  • ID: 1546872
  • Book
  • April 2011
  • 848 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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The cutting–edge guide on advancing the science of molecular imaging using nanoparticles

The use of nanomaterials as diagnostics in medicine and molecular imaging probes is a promising, yet underdeveloped, technology. This indispensable guide helps scientists, chemists, biologists, and even clinicians grasp the essential basics of why and how nanoparticle platforms can be used for molecular imaging. It then proceeds to underscore the scientific and technological opportunities present in this field and outlines an integrated multidisciplinary strategy to encourage development of the next generation of molecular medicine. Nanoplatform–Based Molecular Imaging:

  • Focuses on the rational design of water–soluble, biocompatible nanoparticles for the visualization of cellular function

  • Addresses how this type of imaging can be used as an effective tool for diagnosing cancer, cardiac diseases, and neurodegeneration

  • Discusses general strategies for nanoparticle synthesis, surface chemistry, and bioconjugation chemistry

  • Discusses theranostics, the proposed process of diagnostic therapy that tests patients for possible reactions to new medication and tailors a treatment for them based on test results

  • Emphasizes fundamentals and explains "how to do it" with detailed procedures and preparative methods

Showing how this technology can be a valuable asset in real–world applications such as computed tomography, optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, positron emission tomography, single–photon emission computed tomography, and multimodality imaging, this comprehensive volume deftly summarizes the opinions of those in the forefront of molecular imaging to deliver information that may one day lead to its widespread use and the realization of its potential as a significant and highly dependable diagnostic tool.

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Preface.

Acknowledgments.

Contributors.

Part I Basics of Molecular Imaging and Nanobiotechnology.

1. Basic Principles of Molecular Imaging (Sven H. Hausner).

2. Synthesis of Nanomaterials as a Platform for Molecular Imaging (Jinhao Gao, Jin Xie, Bing Xu, and Xiaoyuan Chen).

3. Nanoparticle Surface Modification and Bioocnjugation (Jin Xie, Jinhao Gao, Mark Michalski, and Xiaoyuan Chen).

4. Biodistribution and Pharmacokinetics of Nanoprobes (Nagesh Kolishetti, Frank Alexis, Eric M. Pridgen, and Omid C. Farokhzad).

Part II Nanoparticles for Single Modality Molecular Imaging.

5. Computed Tomography as a Tool for Anatomical and Molecular Imaging (Pingyu Liu, Hu Zhou, and Lei Xing).

6. Carbon Nanotube X–Ray for Dynamic Micro–CT Imaging of Small Animal Models (Otto Zhou, Guohua Cao, Yueh Z. Lee, and Jianping Lu).

7. Quantum Dots for In Vivo Molecular Imaging (Yun Xing).

8. Biopolymer, Dendrimer and Liposome Nanoplatforms for Optical Molecular Imaging (David Pham, Ling Zhang, Bo Chen, and Ella F. Jones).

9. Nanoplatforms for Raman Molecular Imaging in Biological Systems (Zhuang Liu).

10. Single–Walled Carbon Nanotube Near–Infrared Fluorescent Sensors for Biological Systems (Jingqing Zhang, and Michael S. Strano).

11. Microparticle– and Nanoparticle–Based Contrast–Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging (Nirupama Deshpande, and Jurgen K. Willmann).

12. Ultrasound–Based Molecular Imaging Using Nanoagents (Srivalleesha Mallidi, Mohammad Mehrmohammadi, Kimberly Homan, Bo Wang, Min Qu, Timothy Larson, Konstantin Sokolov, and Stanislav Emelianov).

13. MRI Contrast Agents Based on Inorganic Nanoparticles (Hyon B. Na, and Taghwan Hyeon).

14. Cellular Magnetic Labeling with Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (Sebastien Boutry, Sophie Laurent, Luce V. Elst, and Robert N. Muller).

15. Nanoparticles Containing Rare Earth Ions: A Tunable Tool for MRI (C. Riviére, S. Roux, R. Bazzi, J.–L. Bridot, C. Billotey, P. Perriat, and O. Tillement).

16. Microfabricated Multispectral MRI Contrast Agents (Gary Zabow, and Alan Koretsky).

17. Radiolabeled Nanoplatforms: Imaging Hot Bullets Hitting Their Targets (Raffaella Rossin).

Part III: Nanoparticle Platforms as Multimodality Imaging and Therapy Agents.

18. Lipoprotein–Based Nanoplatforms for Cancer Molecular Imaging (Ian R. Corbin, Kenneth Ng, and Gang Zheng).

19. Protein Cages as Multimode Imaging Agents (Masaki Uchida, Lars Liepold, Peter Suci, Mark Young, and Trevor Douglas).

20. Biomedical Applications of Single–Walled Carbon Nanotubes (Weibo Cai, Ting Gao, and Hao Hong).

21. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging (Yonglong Hou, and Rui Hao).

22. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Cancer Theragnostics (Seulki Lee, Ick Chan Kwon, and Kwangmeyung Kim).

23. Nanoparticles for Combined Cancer Imaging and Therapy (Vaishali Bagolkot, Mikyung Yu, and Sangyong Jon).

24. Multimodal Imaging and Therapy with Magnetofluorescent Nanoparticles (Jason McCarthy, and Ralph Weissleder).

25. Gold Nanocages: A Multifunctional Platform for Molecular Optical Imaging and Photothermal Treatment (Leslie Au, Claire M. Cobley, Jingyi Chen, and Younan Xia).

26. Theranostic Applications of Gold Nanoparticles in Cancer (Parmeswaran Diagaradjane, Pranshu Mohindra, and Sunil Krishnan).

27. Gold Nanorods as Theranostic Agents (Alexander Wei, Qingshan Wei, and Alexei P. Lenov).

28. Theranostic Applications of Gold Core–Shell Structured Nanoparticles (Wei Lu, Marites Melancon, and Chun Li).

29. Magnetic Nanoparticle Carrier for Targeted Drug Delivery: Perspective, Outlook and Design (R.D.K. Misra).

30. Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles: A Multidimensional Platform for Targeted Image–Guided Drug Delivery (Gregory M. Lanza, Shelton D. Caruthers, Anne H. Schmieder, Patrick M. Winter, Tillmann Cyrue, Samuel and A. Wickline).

31. Radioimmunonanoparticles for Cancer Imaging and Therapy (Arutselvan Natarajan).

Part IV: Translational Nanomedicine.

32. Current Status and Future Prospects for Nanoparticle–Based Technology in Human Medicine (Nuria Sanvicens, Fatima Fernandez, J.–Pablo Salvador, and M.–Pilar Marco).

Index.

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Xiaoyuan Chen
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