The Enzymes, Vol 24

  • ID: 1764428
  • Book
  • 592 Pages
  • Elsevier Science and Technology
1 of 4
Protein methylation has recently emerged as one of the most exciting areas of study on posttranslational modification. A large family of protein methyltransferases has been identified and their structural properties have been characterized. These studies have provided novel insights into how methylation regulates a variety of biological functions including DNA and RNA metabolism, protein synthesis and signal transduction. Methylation also plays important roles in aging. This volume is intended to capture these recent developments concerning protein methyltransferases.
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
2 of 4
Part I: Overview of Protein Methyltransferases
Part II: Modification of Lysine and Arginine Residues in Signal Transduction, Transcription Translation, and Other Functions
Part III: Biological Regulation by Protein Methyl Ester Formation
Part IV: Recognition of Damaged Proteins in Aging by Protein Methyltransferases
Part V: Modification of Proteins by Methylation of Glutamine and Asparagine Residues
Part VI: Inhibition of Metyltransferases by Metabolites
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
3 of 4

Loading
LOADING...

4 of 4
Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko
Fuyu Tamanoi is a biochemist who has served on the UCLA School of Medicine and UCLA College faculty since he joined the Department of Microbiology, Immunology & Molecular Genetics in 1993. He became a full professor in 1997. Since 1996, he has been a Director of Signal Transduction Program Area at Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Tamanoi earned his B.S. and M.S. in Biochemistry at the University of Tokyo. He received PhD in Molecular Biology at Nagoya University in 1977. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School, where he worked on bacteriophage DNA replication. From 1980 to 1985, he was a senior staff investigator at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, where he worked on adenovirus DNA replication. From 1985 to 1993, he was an Assistant Professor and then Associate Professor at the University of Chicago, where he initiated studies on lipid modification of the Ras family proteins. His laboratory research centers on signal transduction and signal transduction inhibitors. He is currently exploring ways to deliver signal transduction inhibitors using nanoparticles.
Clarke, Steven G.
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
5 of 4
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Adroll
adroll