Charge and Exciton Transport through Molecular Wires

  • ID: 1801773
  • Book
  • 334 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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As functional elements in opto–electronic devices approach the singlemolecule limit, conducting organic molecular wires are the appropriate

interconnects that enable transport of charges and charge–like particles such as excitons within the device. Reproducible syntheses and a

thorough understanding of the underlying principles are therefore indispensable for applications like even smaller transistors, molecular

machines and light–harvesting materials. Bringing together experiment and theory to enable applications in real–life devices, this handbook

and ready reference provides essential information on how to control and direct charge transport. Readers can therefore obtain a balanced

view of charge and exciton transport, covering characterization techniques such as spectroscopy and current measurements together with quantitative models. Researchers are thus able to improve the performance of newly developed devices, while an additional overview of synthesis methods highlights ways of producing different organic wires. Written with the following market in mind: chemists, molecular

physicists, materials scientists and electrical engineers.
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INTRODUCTION: MOLECULAR ELECTRONICS AND MOLECULAR WIRES

Introduction

Single–Molecule Devices

Transport of Charges and Excitons in Molecular Wires

PART I: Molecules between Electrodes

QUANTUM INTERFERENCE IN ACYCLIC MOLECULES

Introduction

Theoretical Methods

Interference in Acyclic Cross–Conjugated Molecules

Understanding Interference in Model Systems

Using Interference for Devices

Probing the Limits of Calculations: Important Real–World Phenomena

Conclusions

HOPPING TRANSPORT IN LONG CONJUGATED MOLECULAR WIRES CONNECTED TO METALS

Introduction

Charge Transport Mechanisms

Oligophenylene Imine Molecular Wires: A Flexible System for Examining the Physical Organic Chemistry of Hopping Conduction in Molecules

Outlook: Probing the Physical Organic Chemistry of Hopping Conduction

PART II: Donor–Bridge–Acceptor Systems

TUNNELING THROUGH CONJUGATED BRIDGES IN DESIGNED DONOR–BRIDGE–ACCEPTOR MOLECULES

Introduction

Through–Bond Electronic Coupling in Pi–Conjugated Bridges

Conclusions

BASE PAIR SEQUENCE AND HOLE TRANSFER THROUGH DNA: RATIONAL DESIGN OF MOLECULAR WIRES

Introduction

Spectral Signatures of Charge Transfer

Charge Injection into A–Tracts

Crossover from Superexchange to Hopping in Sa––An––Sd

Symmetry Breaking in Sa––An––Sa

Influence of a Single G on Charge Transport

Molecular Wire Behavior in Sa––A2–3G1–7––SD

Charge Transfer through Alternating Sequences

Theoretical Descriptions of Charge Transfer through DNA

Conclusion

CHARGE TRANSPORT THROUGH MOLECULES: ORGANIC NANOCABLES FOR MOLECULAR ELECTRONICS

Introduction

Theoretical Concepts

Charge Transport along Pi–Conjugated Bridges in C60–Containing Donor–Bridge–Acceptor Conjugates

Conclusion

PART III: Charge Transport through Wires in Solution

ELECTRON AND EXCITON TRANSPORT TO APPENDED TRAPS

Introduction

Experimental Methods to Investigate Transport to Appended Traps

Results on Transport to Traps

Comparison and Perspectives

ELECTRON LATTICE DYNAMICS AS A METHOD TO STUDY CHARGE TRANSPORT IN CONJUGATED POLYMERS

Introduction

Methodology

Results

Summary

CHARGE TRANSPORT ALONG ISOLATED CONJUGATED MOLECULAR WIRES MEASURED BY PULSE RADIOLYSIS TIME–RESOLVED MICROWAVE CONDUCTIVITY

Introduction

Pulse–Radiolysis Time–Resolved Microwave Conductivity

Mechanisms for Charge Transport along Conjugated Chains

The Meaning of the Mobility at Microwave Frequencies

Charge Transport along Ladder–Type PPP

Effect of Torsional Disorder on the Mobility

Effect of Chain Coiling on the Mobility of Charges

Supramolecular Control of Charge Transport along Molecular Wires

Summary and Outlook

PART IV: Exciton Transport through Conjugated Molecular Wires

STRUCTURE PROPERTY RELATIONSHIPS FOR EXCITON TRANSFER IN CONJUGATED POLYMERS

Introduction

Signal Gain in Aplifying Fluorescent Polymers

Directing Energy Transfer within CPs: Dimensionality and Molecular Design

Lifetime Modulation

Conformational Dependence on Energy Migration: Conjugated Polymer–Liquid Crystal Solutions

Conclusions

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Laurens D. A. Siebbeles
Ferdinand C. Grozema
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