Nanotechnology for Drug Delivery: Global Market for Nanocrystals

  • ID: 2124025
  • Report
  • Region: Global
  • 109 Pages
  • Cientifica Ltd
1 of 4
Nanocrystals will account for 60% of a $136 billion nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery market by 2021. We forecast the total market size in 2021 to be US$136 billion, with a 60/40 split between nanocrystals and nanocarriers respectively.

Since we now understand that most (if not all) biological processes occur at the nanoscale, the application of life science principles – studying the causes of biological phenomena at the molecular level – means that medical and biomedical research is increasingly using a bottom-up (rather than the top-down) approach.

One of the biggest challenges researchers face when developing a new drug is how to maximise its solubility in the body. Poor solubility in water correlates with poor bioavailability, which in turn leads to poor delivery. Nanocrystals are ground in special mills producing nano-sized drugs, which are applicable intravenously as nanosuspensions. This procedure enhances the surface/volume-ratio and thus the solubility and bioavailability of most insoluble pharmaceuticals.

The low bioavailability resulting from traditional oral and intravenous drug delivery methods and the market forces at work in the pharmaceutical industry – where patents expire after a relatively short period of time unless a novel form of drug delivery is developed that will extend the patent – are two major forces that will fuel the growth of the nano tech enabled drug delivery market.

The healthcare market is changing. We are seeing a paradigm shift away from blockbusters and a ‘one-size fits all’ approach to a more personalised medicine based on an individual’s unique genome and immune response. The more scientists learn about the molecular causes for disease the more targeted and effective nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery therapies will become.
READ MORE
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
2 of 4
TABLE OF EXHIBITS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION
REPORT SCOPE
METHODOLOGY
Procurement
Calculation of CAGR
THE NANOSCALE
Two biological examples that illustrate nanoscale:

CHAPTER 2 – NANOTECHNOLOGY IN MEDICINE AND BIOMEDICINE
OVERVIEW OF NANOTECHNOLOGY IN MEDICINE AND BIOMEDICINE
Why is Nanotechnology A Critical Application for Medicine and Biomedicine?
Why Nanotechnology Is Needed for Medicine and Biomedicine
WHAT ARE THE KEY DRIVERS FOR ADOPTION OF NANOTECHNOLOGY IN MEDICINE AND BIOMEDICINE?
The Aim Of Drug Targeting
Rapid Market Growth
Market Drivers For Enhanced Drug Delivery
Increasing Proportion of The Ageing Population
Demand For More Affordable Health Care
Public Health – Ending disease
Demand for More Innovation
Social responsibility
THE KEY APPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGY IN MEDICINE AND BIOMEDICINE
How Nanotechnology Can Benefit Drug Delivery
Nanotechnology in Medical and Biomedical Diagnostics
Nanotechnology in Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering
Other Applications For Nanomaterials In The Medical And Pharmaceutical Sector
PROMISING EXAMPLES OF NANOTECHNOLOGY ENABLED DRUG DELIVERY
Case Study 1 – Magnetic Field Acts as "Remote Control" to Deliver Nanomedicine
Case Study 2 - Adaptive Micro and Nanoparticles: Temporal Control Over Carrier
Properties to Facilitate Drug Delivery
Case Study 3 – Fabrication of a Nanocarrier System Through Self-Assembly of Plasma
Protein And Its Tumour Targeting
Case Study 4 – IBM And The Institute of Bioengineering And Nanotechnology Find
Breakthrough For MRSA

CHAPTER 3 – RISK & REGULATION
THREE KEY BARRIERS TO THE ADOPTION OF NANOTECHNOLOGY IN MEDICINE AND BIOMEDICINE
Nanotoxicity, Nanopollution and Nanosafety
Ethical Considerations Of Nanotherapies
Delayed Nanoregulation
FIVE CURRENT & FUTURE CHALLENGES IN THE ADOPTION OF NANOTECHNOLOGY IN MEDICINE AND BIOMEDICINE
Current & Future Challenges of Nanosafety And Risk Management
Current & Future Challenges of Nanoregulation
Current & Future Challenges for the Nanomedicine Industry
Current & Future Challenges of Sustained Innovation
Current & Future Challenges of Cooperation

CHAPTER 4 – MARKET FOR NANOCRYSTALS
GLOBAL NDD MARKET ANALYSIS: 2000-2010
GLOBAL NDD MARKET FORECAST: 2011-2021
DISCUSSION OF NANOPARTICLES AND NANOCRYSTALS
Overview of The Key Nanotechnologies Used in Drug Delivery Sorted by Applications
Nanopharmaceuticals
Nanotechnology In Drug Delivery
Nanobiotechnology In Drug Delivery
Analytical Techniques For Nanoparticle Drug Delivery
Properties
Production of Nanoparticles
Measuring Dispersion of Nanoparticles
Characterisation of Delivery Systems
What Can Nanoparticles do in Drug Delivery?
Drug Nanocrystals: Nanosizing The Drugs
Clinically Approved Nanocrystals-Based Drug Formulations With Presence on The Market
Production methods
Projected Product Pipeline For Nanocrystals-Based Drug Formulations In Drug Delivery
Market
Semapimod® (cytokine, pharmasciences)
Paxceed™
Theralux™
Nucryst®
iSPERSE™
ANALYSIS OF TAM FOR NANOCRYSTALS: 2000-2010
TAM FORECAST FOR NANOCRYSTALS: 2011-2021

APPENDIX
PUBLISHING ACTIVITY BY ORGANIZATION (2000-2010)

Exhibit 1.1
Formula for the calculation of the Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR), (top).
Formula for the calculation of the Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) in this report, for the 2011-2021 period, (bottom) [2].

Exhibit 1.2
Formula for the verification of the calculated values of the Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR), (top).
Formula for the verification of the calculated values of the Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) in this report, for the 2011-2021 period, (bottom) [2].

Exhibit 1.3
Nanometers in a meter (top). Meters in a nanometer (bottom).

Exhibit 2.1
Illustration of the fact that the periodic table of elements, as we know it (at meter scale) governed by classic
Newtonian laws of physics. However, when perceived at nanoscale, those elements are governed by the laws of quantum physics.

Exhibit 2.2
Proportion of the population aged over 65 and over 80 [7].

Exhibit 2.3
Illustration of a diagram of each property of nanocarriers (size, shape, surface chemistry and mechanical properties) and their parameters subjected to optimization in order to improve their efficiency [10].

Exhibit 3.1
Specified expected barriers in the development of particular types of nanoparticles (Courtesy of CienNanoroadmap Synthesis Report), [6].

Exhibit 3.2
Illustration of the measures adoption roadmap to combat/attenuate the key barriers to the adoption of nanotechnology in medicine and biomedicine (Source: Cientifica, Ltd.).

Exhibit 3.3
Table representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM (2000-2010), for nanotechnology in drug delivery, without segmentation, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 3.4
Line chart representing Total Addressable Market, TAM (2000-2010), for nanotechnology in drug delivery, without segmentation, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 3.5
Bar chart representing Total Addressable Market, TAM (2000-2010), for nanotechnology in drug delivery, without segmentation, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 3.6
Table representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM forecast by 2021 (for the 2011-2021 period), for nanotechnology in drug delivery, without segmentation, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 3.7
Line chart representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM forecast by 2021 (for the 2011-2021 period), for nanotechnology in drug delivery, without segmentation, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 3.8
Bar chart representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM forecast by 2021 (for the 2011-2021 period), for
nanotechnology in drug delivery, without segmentation, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 4.1
Typical Image of Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles [1].

Exhibit 4.26
Table representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM forecast by 2021 (for the 2011-2021 period), for nanocrystals, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 4.4
Advantages and disadvantages of different methods for the production of drug nanocrystals [6].

Exhibit 4.67
Table representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM forecast by 2021 (for the 2011-2021 period), for nanocrystals, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 4.7
Representative examples of clinically approved nanocrystals-based drug formulations with presence on the market [6]

Exhibit 4.37
3-D pie chart representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM in 2010, for nanotechnology in drug delivery, nanocarriers versus drug nanocrystals, source: Cientifica (all figures in percentage).

Exhibit 4.38
Line chart representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM (2000-2010), for nanotechnology in drug delivery, nanocarriers versus drug nanocrystals, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 4.39
3-D stacked vertical bar graph representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM (2000-2010) , for nanotechnology in drug delivery, nanocarriers versus drug nanocrystals, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 4.40
3-D stacked area chart representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM (2000-2010) , for nanotechnology in drug delivery, nanocarriers versus drug nanocrystals, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 4.45
In vivo effects of nanocrystals-based drug formulations [6].

Exhibit 4.78
3-D pie chart representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM forecast in 2021, for nanotechnology in drug delivery, nanocarriers versus drug nanocrystals, source: Cientifica (all figures in percentage).

Exhibit 4.79
Horizontal bar graph representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM forecast in 2021, for nanotechnology in drug delivery, nanocarriers versus drug nanocrystals, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 4.80
Line chart representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM forecast by 2021 (for the 2011-2021 period), for nanotechnology in drug delivery, nanocarriers versus drug nanocrystals, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 4.81
3-D stacked vertical bar graph representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM forecast by 2021 (for the
2011-2021 period), for nanotechnology in drug delivery, nanocarriers versus drug nanocrystals, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Exhibit 4.82
3-D stacked area chart representing the Total Addressable Market, TAM forecast by 2021 (for the 2011-2021 period), for nanotechnology in drug delivery, nanocarriers versus drug nanocrystals, source: Cientifica (all figures US$ Million Dollars).

Appendix

Exhibit A.1
Table of the top 20 organizations showing the highest publishing activity in PubMed periodicals (2000-2010), based on PubMed, for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery. World Region: North America; country: USA.
Organizations are ordered first by descending order of total articles published and then ordered alphabetically (increasing order), if applicable.

Exhibit A.2
Table of the top 20 organizations showing the highest publishing activity in PubMed periodicals (2000-2010), based on PubMed, for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery. World Region: European Union; country: Germany.
Organizations are ordered first by descending order of total articles published and then ordered alphabetically (increasing order), if applicable.

Exhibit A.3
Table of the top 20 organizations showing the highest publishing activity in PubMed periodicals (2000-2010), based on PubMed, for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery. World Region: European Union; country: France.
Organizations are ordered first by descending order of total articles published and then ordered alphabetically (increasing order), if applicable.

Exhibit A.4
Table of the top 20 organizations showing the highest publishing activity in PubMed periodicals (2000-2010), based on PubMed, for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery. World Region: European Union; country: UK.
Organizations are ordered first by descending order of total articles published and then ordered alphabetically (increasing order), if applicable.

Exhibit A.5
Table of publishing activity in PubMed periodicals (2000-2010), based on PubMed, for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery. Country: Russian Federation.
Organizations are ordered alphabetically (increasing order).

Exhibit A.6
Table of the top 20 organizations showing the highest publishing activity in PubMed periodicals (2000-2010), based on PubMed, for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery. World Region: Asia; country: India.
Organizations are ordered first by descending order of total articles published and then ordered alphabetically (increasing order), if applicable.

Exhibit A.7
Table of the top 20 organizations showing the highest publishing activity in PubMed periodicals (2000-2010), based on PubMed, for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery. World Region: Asia; country: India.
Organizations are ordered first by descending order of total articles published and then ordered alphabetically (increasing order), if applicable.

Exhibit A.8
Table of the top 20 organizations showing the highest publishing activity in PubMed periodicals (2000-2010), based on PubMed, for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery. World Region: Asia; country: Japan.
Organizations are ordered first by descending order of total articles published and then ordered alphabetically
(increasing order), if applicable.

Exhibit A.9
Table of the top 20 organizations showing the highest publishing activity in PubMed periodicals (2000-2010), based on PubMed, for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery. World Region: Asia; country: P R China.
Organizations are ordered first by descending order of total articles published and then ordered alphabetically (increasing order), if applicable.

Exhibit A.10
Table of the top 20 organizations showing the highest publishing activity in PubMed periodicals (2000-2010),
based on PubMed, for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery. World Region: Asia; country: South Korea (Republic of Korea).
Organizations are ordered first by descending order of total articles published and then ordered alphabetically (increasing order), if applicable.

Exhibit A.11
Table of publishing activity in PubMed periodicals (2000-2010), based on PubMed, for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery. Asia; country: Taiwan.
Organizations are ordered first by descending order of total articles published and then ordered alphabetically (increasing order), if applicable.
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
3 of 4

Loading
LOADING...

4 of 4
Cientifica predicts drug nanocrystal market will reach US$81.9 billion by 2021

Nanocrystals will outperform nanocarriers by 20%

Nanocrystal-based drugs showed the highest market growth in the last decade compared to other nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery systems studied, according to Cientifica Ltd.'s latest research. This is largely due to the shorter development times and smaller investment needed to create nanocrystals. The report presents a detailed discussion of recent developments (2000-2010) in nanocrystal therapies and future opportunities (2011-2021).

“We forecast the total nanotech drug delivery (NDD) market in 2021 will be US$136 billion,” said Tim Harper, CEO of Cientifica, “with a 60/40 split in favour of drug nanocrystals. Poor solubility and bioavailability of many new and existing drugs is driving demand for nanocrystal pharmaceuticals.”

The two different approaches to nanotech drug delivery – nanocarriers to deliver drugs more effectively to targeted cells, and nanocrystals, the process of making drug crystals smaller to increase solubility and bioavailability – both provide opportunities for pharmaceutical manufacturers to extend the patent life of their products. This component of the Nanotechnology for Drug Delivery report focuses on NDD market opportunities in nanocrystal technologies.

One of the biggest challenges researchers face when developing a new drug is how to maximise its solubility in the body. Poor solubility in water correlates with poor bioavailability, which in turn leads to poor delivery. By increasing the surface/volume ratio of drugs – making the drug particles themselves smaller – they are far more easily absorbed by the body.

“The low bioavailability resulting from traditional oral (both tablet and liquid) drug delivery methods and the market forces at work in the pharmaceutical industry – where patents expire after a relatively short period of time unless a novel form of drug delivery is developed that will extend the patent – are two major forces that will fuel the growth of the nanotech enabled drug delivery market,” said Harper.

The National Science Foundation has forecast the global nanotech-enabled market will reach US$1 trillion by 2015, while the National Nanotechnology Initiative predicts it will reach US$3 trillion by 2020. Drug nanocrystals would therefore account for approximately 2.5% of the total global nanotechnology market in 2015 and 3.5% in 2021.
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
5 of 4
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Adroll
adroll