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Interacting with Geospatial Technologies

  • ID: 2172265
  • Book
  • 312 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Interacting with Geospatial Technologies provides an introduction to Human–Computer Interaction (HCI) and usability aspects of Geographical Information Technologies from Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to web mapping applications. The book provides a clear introduction to the principles of HCI, a discussion about those special usability aspects of GIS which designers and developers need to take into account when developing such systems, and it offers a set of tried and tested frameworks, matrices and techniques that can be used within GIS projects.

The introductory text covers a range of topics, from the cognitive models of geographical representation to interface design. It provides the reader with frameworks and techniques that can be used and case studies in which these techniques have been used for computer mapping application.

  • Takes an integrative approach to the subject to draw together the latest developments in the field.
  • Carefully structured to introduce the genera principles of HCI and usability research and provide the basic theory of spatial cognition, map reading and the fundamentals of cartographic principles.
  • Includes numerous case studies to show usability in practice for example, Desktop GIS, Web–based GIS and Geovisualization Systems along with more recognizable geographic technologies such as SatNav, web maps and Mashups.
  • An invaluable reference for those people taking courses in GIS. Geoinformatics, Geomatic Engineering or Spatial Information management, as well as computer scientists and information systems designers.
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Preface.

About the authors.

How to use this book.

Acknowledgements.

SECTION I THEORY.

1 Human–computer interaction and geospatial technologies context Mordechai (Muki) Haklay and Artemis Skarlatidou).

1.1 Human–computer interaction and usability engineering background.

1.2 Geographic Information Systems and science history.

1.3 Human–Computer Interaction and GIScience research.

Summary.

Further reading.

Revision questions.

2 Human understanding of space (Clare Davies, Chao (Lily) Li and Jochen Albrecht).

2.1 Introduction.

2.2 Spatial cognition: screen versus geography.

2.3 Geographic spatial cognition learning, understanding and recall.

2.4 GIS in the outside environment: matching maps to geography.

Summary.

Further reading.

Revision questions.

3 Cartographic theory and principles (Catherine (Kate) Emma Jones).

3.1 Principles of cartographic representation.

3.2 Impact of projections on map design.

3.3 Impact of cartographic scale on map design.

3.4 Generalization.

Summary.

Further reading.

Revision questions.

4 Computer–mediated communication, collaboration and groupware (Mordechai (Muki) Haklay).

4.1 Computer–mediated communication.

4.2 Social dynamics and group decision–making issues.

4.3 Computer Supported Collaborative Work and Groupware (CSCW).

4.4 Principles of collaborative GIS.

Summary.

Further reading.

Revision questions.

SECTION II FRAMEWORK.

5 User–centred design (Mordechai (Muki) Haklay and Annu–Maaria Nivala).

5.1 Background.

5.2 Principles.

5.3 Applying user–centred design in geospatial technologies.

5.4 Participatory design.

Summary.

Further reading.

Revision questions.

6 Usability engineering (Mordechai (Muki) Haklay, Artemis Skarlatidou and Carolina Tobón).

6.1 Background.

6.2 Usability engineering and product development process.

6.3 Understanding user requirements and needs.

6.4 Application development.

6.5 Evaluation and deployment.

6.6 Usability engineering in research.

Summary.

Further reading.

Revision questions.

SECTION III PRACTICALITIES AND TECHNIQUE.

7 Application planning (Jochen Albrecht and Clare Davies).

7.1 GIS interface complexity.

7.2 Task analysis in GIS.

7.3 Formalized analysis of GIS user interfaces.

7.4 User experience considerations.

7.5 Task analysis as the basis for workflow management.

7.6 Geo–scientific workflows and process models.

7.7 Ontologies in support of application planning for the semantic web.

Summary.

Further reading.

Revision questions.

8 Practical cartography (Catherine (Kate) Emma Jones).

8.1 The role of symbology in map making.

8.2 The role of colour in map making.

8.3 Data classification types of maps and thematic mapping.

8.4 Mapping conventions map elements and layout.

Summary.

Further reading.

Revision questions.

9 Principles of interaction (Jessica Wardlaw).

9.1 Key elements of the theory of interaction for geospatial technologies.

9.2 Basic elements of GUI.

9.3 Some guidelines for designing a GIS interface.

Summary.

Revision questions.

10 Evaluation and deployment (Stephanie Larissa Marsh and Mordechai (Muki) Haklay).

10.1 Evaluation options from usability laboratory to guerrilla usability.

10.2 Evaluation techniques.

10.3 Methodological consideration of usability techniques.

Summary.

Further reading.

Revision questions.

11 Single user environments: desktop to mobile (Mordechai (Muki) Haklay and (Lily) Chao Li).

11.1 Technological considerations.

11.2 Understanding the user context.

11.3 Designing desktop applications.

11.4 Mobile devices.

Summary.

Further reading.

Revision questions.

12 Web–mapping applications and HCI considerations for their design (Artemis Skarlatidou).

12.1 Overview of Web–mapping.

12.2 Web–mapping design and HCI considerations.

Summary.

Further reading.

Revision questions.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Mordechai (Muki) Haklay
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