Content Production Technologies

  • ID: 2174312
  • Book
  • 214 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Content Production Technologies covers the growing demand for the archiving of video content as broadcasting channels increase along with the emergence of the need for broadcast programs to be stored. This book discusses the storage of accessible high–quality video material on networked, large–scale archives, optimised for easy retrieval delivery over broadcast and broadband media. It also describes the retrieval methods and editing options.

Unfortunately, it is relatively easy to copy digital content and retain reproduction quality. Solutions to problems of this kind are presented in this book. Combined with this, an examination of the protection of intellectual property rights takes place that will be of utmost importance to content owners.

The book offers:

  • An examination of the design and implementation of a practical digital content production systems.
  • Various retrieval methods for large–scale archives using MPEG–1 streaming technology and remote editing
  • A discussion of large–scale video archive systems, which will enable high–speed retrieval and edit functions for large amounts of video data with multi–purpose applications.
This book will appeal to Broadcast engineers, Systems Integrators, Engineers for equipment manufacturers and Researchers and Developers in content production and digital archiving.
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Preface.

About the Editors.

About the Contributors.

Acknowledgements.

Abbreviations.

Introduction.

1. What is a Large–scale Archive?

2. Content Production from Digital Archives.

3. Archive–correlated Technology Standards.

4. Experiment for Content Production with Content ID and MPEG–7.

5. New Content Production  and Distribution Environment.

6. Recap and the Future.

7. Utilization and Systematization of Video Assets.

Index.

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Hasegawa, Fumio

Tohoku University of Art and Design

(email: fumio@in.tuad.ac.jp)

Fumio received an MSc from the University of Electro–Communications and joined the Shimizu Corporation in 1974. In 1986 he received a DEng from the University of Tokyo and was a visiting researcher at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). In 1989 he became an assistant professor at the University of Tokyo. He was the Leader of the R&D project at the Yamagata Video Archive Research Center (YRC) of the Telecommunications Advancement Organization of Japan (TAO) from April 1999 to march 2003 and is now the senior director of the graduate school at the Tohoku University of Art and Design.

Hiki, Haruo

Japan International Cooperation Agency, Uruguay

(email: hh2001@ca2.so–net.ne.jp)

Haruo graduated from the University of Electro–Communications and joined the Sony Corporation VTR Development Division in 1965. For 20 years he worked on many aspects of R&D for video camera, VTR and video–editing system in PAL, SECAM, and NTSC, which included R&D in Paris for 7 years. Then he worked in the personal computer field for 5 years and in the digital interface standardization field for a further 5 years. He was a senior researcher at YRC/TAO from April 1999 to March 2003, where he was in charge of network–based editing technology in the R&D project, ′Fundamental Technology of Broadcasting Program Production with Large–scale Video Archives′. He is now a free lance journalist for archival production.

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