Wiley Survival Guide in Global Telecommunications. Signaling Principles, Protocols, and Wireless Systems. Wiley Survival Guides in Engineering and Science

  • ID: 2175588
  • Book
  • Region: Global
  • 440 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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A survival guide to global telecommunication technologies

As our world grows ever more complex, no one can expect to be knowledgeable in, let alone master every technology. But as telecommunications technologies permeate nearly every aspect of our lives, gaining a working understanding of their principles and applications has become essential for both professional and personal success. For the undergraduate student preparing for his or her future vocation to the accomplished professional on track for a rapid career move, this book is the "survival guide" to telecommunications a quick introduction to the most important telecom technologies. Written with accuracy and rigor, this guide avoids any unnecessary background or academic style in order to introduce you directly to the core knowledge and understanding.

Wiley Survival Guide in Global Telecommunications: Signaling Principles, Network Protocols, and Wireless Systems provides in–depth discussions of key areas in telecommunications, including:

  • Signal modulation, coding, transmission, detection, and error correction
  • Telephony and data networking, from PSTN to packet–switched/LAN protocols and ISDN
  • Core–network transmission protocols (SONET/SDH, ATM, TCP/IP, and Internet suite)
  • Wireless communications (3G/4G mobile, satellite, and WLAN)

Designed to be accessible to a wide range of readers, the book steers you directly into the relevant issues, while elucidating the science and engineering involved without heavy–duty mathematics, allowing you to produce results using your pocket calculator. You can read each chapter in sequence or, if you prefer, jump to topics of interest as you wish. A wealth of easy and practical exercises illustrate the concepts; chapter–end summaries of main keywords and acronyms clarify the technical language; and a selected reference list including Web sites leads you to other helpful sources for further investigation.

Arm yourself with the knowledge you need to survive in the telecom world with this indispensible guide.

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Forword, ix

Preface, xiii

Acronyms, xix

Introduction: The Network Cloud, 1

CHAPTER 1 Signal Modulation, Coding, Detection and Processing, 11

1.1 Waves and Analog Signals, 12

1.1.1 Sinusoids and Waveforms, 13

1.1.2 Analog Waveform Modulation, 16

1.1.3 Frequency–Division Multiplexing with Voice Channels, 19

1.2 Digital Signals and Coding, 22

1.2.1 Binary Number Representation, 23

1.2.2 Binary Coding into Waveforms, 26

1.2.3 Multilevel Coding and M–ary Modulation, 31

1.3 Analog–to–Digital Voice Conversion, 33

1.3.1 Pulse–Code Modulation, 33

1.3.2 Differential and Adaptative PCM, 36

1.3.3 Other Conversion Techniques, 38

1.4 Channel Noise, 39

1.4.1 Signal Mean and Variance, 39

1.4.2 The Gaussian or Normal Probability Distribution, 41

1.4.3 Eye Diagram of Binary Signals, 41

1.5 Binary Transmission and Detection, 44

1.5.1 Transmission System Elements, 44

1.5.2 Direct–Detection Binary Receivers, 48

1.5.3 Coherent Detection, 52

1.5.4 System Power Budget, 57

1.5.5 In–line Regeneration and Amplification, 57

1.5.6 Noise Figure of Active/Passive Transmission System Elements, 59

1.6 Error–Correction Coding, 62

1.6.1 Linear Block Codes, 63

1.6.2 Cyclic Codes, 68

1.6.3 Types of Error–Correcting Codes, 70

1.7 Channel Information Capacity, 72

1.7.1 Channel Information and Entropy, 73

1.7.2 Coding Efficiency, 75

1.7.3 Mutual Information, Equivocation and Channel Capacity, 76

1.7.4 Shannon Hartley Law, 79

1.7.5 Bandwidth Efficiency, 82

Exercises, 85

My Vocabulary, 87

CHAPTER 2 Telephony and Data Networking, 91

2.1 Public Switched Telephone Networks (PSTN) and Services, 91

2.1.1 PSTN Topology, 92

2.1.2 Making a Phone Connection, 94

2.1.3 Interoffice Trunking and PSTN Environment, 95

2.1.4 Private Branch Exchanges (PBX) and Centrexes, 98

2.1.5 Integrated Services Digital Networks (ISDN), 98

2.2 Analog Frequency–Division Multiplexing, 101

2.2.1 FDM Hierarchy, 102

2.3 Plesiosynchronous Multiplexing, 103

2.3.1 T–Span Multiplexing and Framing, 104

2.3.2 Plesiosynchronous Digital Hierarchy, 105

2.4 Packet–Switched Networks, 109

2.4.1 The Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Model, 112

2.4.2 X.25 and Frame Relay, 115

2.5 Local Area Networks, 118

2.5.1 Network Topology and Connectivity, 119

2.5.2 Ethernet, 122

2.5.3 Token Bus and Token Ring, 123

2.5.4 Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI), 124

2.5.5 Switched Multimegabit Digital Service (SMDS), 128

Exercises, 130

My Vocabulary, 131

CHAPTER 3 An Overview of Core–Network Transmission Protocols, 133

3.1 Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) and Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) Protocols, 133

3.1.1 Limitations of Plesiosynchronous Digital Hierarchy, 134

3.1.2 SDH Framing Structure, 135

3.1.3 SONET Framing Structure, 139

3.1.4 STM–N and STS–N Framing, 142

3.1.5 SONET/SDH Network Services, 145

3.2 Asynchronous Transfer–Mode (ATM) Protocol, 147

3.2.1 ATM Cell Structure, 148

3.2.2 Virtual Channels and Virtual Paths, 150

3.2.3 ATM Protocol Reference Model (PRM), 152

3.2.4 Adaptation Layer (AAL) Service Types, 154

3.2.5 ATM Network Connection Types and Service Classes, 156

3.2.6 Mapping Protocols Over ATM and the Reverse, 158

3.3 Transmission Control (TCP) and Internet (IP) Protocols, 159

3.3.1 The TCP/IP Suite and Application Layers Stack, 160

3.3.2 The Internet and Internet Connectivities, 162

3.3.3 IP Addressing Format, 163

3.3.4 Datagram Routing, 166

3.3.5 TCP and IP Datagram/Packet Structures (IPv4/IPv6), 169

3.3.6 IP–Layer Functions, 180

3.3.7 Applications Service–Layer Functions, 182

3.3.8 E–mail Addressing, 185

3.3.9 Web–Site Addressing, 186

3.3.10 Mapping IP Over ATM, SDH/SONET, and WDM, 188

3.3.11 The Internet and www Jargon, 192

Exercises, 201

My Vocabulary, 201

CHAPTER 4 Wireless Communications, 205

4.1 Basic Physics of Radio–Wave Signals, 205

4.1.1 Generation of Electromagnetic Waves, 205

4.1.2 Radio Wavebands, 210

4.1.3 Types of Antenna, 213

4.1.4 Radio–Wave Propagation and Reception, 226

4.1.5 Multipath Interference, 235

4.1.6 Effective Noise Temperature, Noise Figure and CNR, 239

4.2 Mobile Radio Communications, 245

4.2.1 Cellular Telephone Networks, 247

4.2.2 Network Grade of Service, 250

4.2.3 Early 1G Mobile Systems and Frequency Allocations, 252

4.2.4 Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM), 256

4.2.5 From 2.5G Towards 3G Mobile Systems, 265

4.2.6 Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS), and cdma2000, 267

4.2.6 3G Services and Beyond 3G, 275

4.2.7 Wireless ATM (WATM) Networks, 277

4.3 Satellite–Based Communications, 281

4.3.1 Types of Satellite–Based Network Services, 281

4.3.2 Engineering Basics of Satellite Orbits, 283

4.3.3 Satellite Telecommunications, 306

4.3.4 High–Altitude Platform Systems (HAPS), 320

4.4 Fixed Wireless Networks, 326

4.4.1 Broadband Wireless Access (BWA), 327

4.4.2 Free–Space Optics (FSO), 332

4.4.3 Wireless LAN (WLAN) and Wi–Fi, 335

4.4.4 Personal–Area Networks (PAN): IrDA and Bluetooth, 340

4.4.5 Wireless Internet Access: WAP and i–Mode, 341

Exercises, 342

My Vocabulary, 345

Solutions to Exercises, 349

Bibliography, 383

Index, 387

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EMMANUEL DESURVIRE has been involved in optical telecommunications for nearly twenty years, starting with a PhD work on Raman fiber amplifiers at Thomson–CSF in 1983, followed by post–doctoral research at Stanford University. He then joined AT&T Bell Laboratories for five years, where he led the early investigation and development of erbium–doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA). For his pioneering contributions to EDFAs, he received several national and international awards including the 1994 Prize from the International Commission for Optics and the 1998 Benjamin Franklin Medal in engineering. After a two–year professorship at Columbia University, he joined Alcatel where he conducted research on long–haul soliton transmission and all–optical regeneration, then 40Gbit/s systems development. He also created and directed a corporate program to foster synergies between experts and promote innovation. An IEEE Fellow, he has authored or coauthored more than 200 technical publications, four books, and over thirty patents.
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