Tropical Fruits. 2nd Edition

  • ID: 2176330
  • Book
  • 335 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Reprinted due to continuing demand, the second edition of this highly regarded book draws on the author′s lifetime experience in tropical fruit husbandry, providing a comprehensive book covering all major aspects of tropical fruits.

Tropical Fruits begins with a discussion of the state and economic importance of tropical fruit growing. Subsequent chapters then consider such aspects as environment, botany, cultural operations, crop protection and harvesting. The remainder of the book deals with specific crops, Citrus, banana and plantain, pineapple, mango, avocado and papaya are each fully discussed in separate chapters. Minor crops such as guava, soursop, nuts, figs and grapes are covered in a final chapter. Special attention is also given to crops that have more recently received wider international attention, including feijoa, kiwi, passion fruit and litchi.

Tropical Fruits is an essential reference for anyone working with these commercially important crops, including agricultural scientists, botanists and food scientists and technologists. Libraries in food companies, fruit wholesalers and in all universities and research establishments where agricultural sciences, plant sciences and food science and technology are studies and taught should have copies of this important landmark publication on their shelves.

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Foreword (Dr. William B. Storey).

Preface to the second edition.

Acknowledgements.

1. Introduction.

Definitions – The present state of tropical frui9t growing – Nutritional considerations – Social and economic factors – Centres of tropical fruit research – references.

2. Environment.

Climate in relation to tropical fruit growing – Soils and fertilizers – Tropical vegetation – references.

3. Botany of tropical fruits.

Taxonomy – Morphology – Physiology – Breeding, selection and propagation – References.

4. Crop husbandry.

Cultural operations – Crop protection – Before and after the harvest – References.

5. Citrus.

Taxonomy and morphology – Uses and composition – Origin, distribution and production – Growth and development – Ecology and physiology – Cultivars – Rootstocks – Cultivation measures – Diseases and pests – From harvest to consumption – References.

6. Banana and plantain.

Taxonomy and morphology – Uses and composition – Origin, distribution and production – Growth and development – Ecology and physiology – Cultivars – Cultivation measures – Diseases and pests – From harvest to consumption – References.

7. Pineapple.

Taxonomy and morphology – Uses and composition – Origin, distribution and production – Growth and development – Ecology and physiology – Cultivars – Cultivation measures – Diseases and pests – From harvest to consumption – References.

8. Mango.

Taxonomy and morphology – Uses and composition – Origin, distribution and production – Growth and development – Ecology and physiology – Cultivars – Cultivation measures – Diseases and pests – From harvest to consumption – References.

9. Avocado.

Taxonomy and morphology – Uses and composition – Origin, distribution and production – Growth and development – Ecology and physiology – Cultivars – Cultivation measures – Diseases and pests – From harvest to consumption – References.

10. Papaya.

Taxonomy and morphology – Uses and composition – Origin, distribution and production – Growth and development – Ecology and physiology – Cultivars – Cultivation measures – Diseases and pests – From harvest to consumption – References.

11. The minor tropical fruits.

Guava and two relatives – Soursop and other annonas – Cashew and other nuts – The date and other palms – The vine crops – Fruits of the Asian rain forest zone – Litchi and longan – Sapodilla and other ′Sapotes′ – ′Cherries′ and ′apples′ – Fig – Pome and stone fruits – Cucurbits – Miscellaneous fruits – References.

Appendix 1. List of families and genera of fruit crops.

Appendix 2. Common names of fruit crops and their botanical equivalents.

Appendix 3. Conversion of some non–metric to metric units and vice versa.

Crop Index.

Geographical Index.

General Index.

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J.A. Samson was until recently Lecturer in Tropical Crop Husbandry at the Agricultural University of Wageningen in the Netherlands. He was formerly Director of the Agricultural Experimental Station, Surinam, and has had extensive practical experience in tropical fruit production.
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