Managing Global Communication in Science and Technology

  • ID: 2181042
  • Book
  • Region: Global
  • 366 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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In compiling articles from eighteen professionals in the field of science and technical communication, this unique collection updates readers on the evolving theory, teaching, and practice within the field. A framework is provided on the direction practitioners and academicians can focus their research or application on. Extensive discussions are provided on the management of the dynamic growth in international and intercultural communication in technical and scientific disciplines. Emphasis is also placed on understanding the issues and training for effectiveness.
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MANAGING DOCUMENT DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT ON THE GLOBAL LEVEL.

"Technical Communicators and their Contribution to the Systems Development Process" (J. Fisher).

"Global Graphics: Effectively Managing Visual Rhetoric for International Audiences" (P. Hager).

"The Impact of International Standards on Technical Communication" (R. Robinson).

MANAGING CROSS–CULTURAL COLLABORATION AND COMMUNICATIONS.

"A Participatory Approach to Communication for Developing Countries" (D. Andrews).

"Technology as a Communication Nexus: Transparent Aid or Technical Hinderance" (C. Ciborra & H. Scheiber).

"Creating Effective Global Teams" (D. Hanson).

"Document Design in the Information Age: A Consideration of Hypertext for International Technical Communication" (J. Inman).

"Lessons on Efficiency from the Field of Computing" (T. Orr).

MANAGING STYLE ON THE INTERNATIONAL LEVEL: TECHNICAL TRANSLATIONS, READABILITY AND USABILITY.

"The Influence of Linguistic Patterns on the Transfer of Strategic Information: A Diachronic Study of the Rhetoric of Patent Applications in the U.S." (M. Frobert–Adamo).

"Improving Cost–Effectiveness in the Documentation Development Process through Integrated Translation" (K. Spalink).

GLOBAL TRAINING FOR SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL COMMUNICATORS.

"The Message Sent vs. The Message Received: Implications for Designing Training Materials for Central and Eastern Europeans" (V. Mikelonis).

"Café, the ou late?: Teaching Technical Communicators to Manage Translation and Localization" (B. Maylath & E. Thrush).

"Preparing Technical Communicators for International Publishing: The Need for Industry–Education Cooperatives" (B. Speck).

ISSUES OF ETHICS IN INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION.

"All Work, No Play, and No Education: The American Apparel Industry′s Responses to the Problems of International Child Labor" (G. Kennedy).

"Managing Ecologically Responsible Publications in the ′Green′ Global Village" (H. Shirk).

"Technical Communication in a Multicultural World: How to Make It an Asset in Managing International Businesses, Lessons from Europe and Asia for the 21st Century" (J. Ulijn & R. Kumar).

Author Profiles.
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"Does an excellent job of introducing the kinds of knowledge and awareness essential to successful intercultural technical communication. By organizing information in different related sections, the editors create a more holistic perspective of how different concepts fir into the vast mosaic of culture and communication. Moreover, by organizing the essays in this fashion, the editors provide various reading audiences (professional technical communicators, educators, and students) with the kind of information each group needs to better address issues of culture and communication. It is a valuable reference source and I recommend it to anyone who is interested in intercultural communication issues."

––Kirk St.Amant, Technical Communication, Vol. 48, No.1 (February 2001)
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