Marketing Planning by Design. Systematic Planning for Successful Marketing Strategy

  • ID: 2211349
  • Book
  • 368 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
1 of 4
"Marketing Planning by Design not only helps internationally active companies to organize their marketing function more efficiently, it also provides medium–sized companies a blueprint for creating and securing high marketing efficiency. Web 2.0 and numerous other new challenges demand the methodical preservation and safeguarding of marketing – beyond individually motivated gut decisions. The book lays the foundation for that."

––
Adriana Nuneva, Senior Vice President, Global Marketing, Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG

"Time and again, marketing has to justify its demand for market–oriented corporate management. Marketing Planning by Design vividly covers how to meet this demand with systematic, well–grounded marketing planning with content aimed at the target group, and lots of inspiration for practical application. It is a plea for the quest for top performance in marketing with high added value."
––Dr Rainer Hillebrand, Member of the Board of Directors, Otto Group

"Medium–sized companies are increasingly faced with the challenge of choosing the right marketing options from an ever growing selection. A limited budget has to be implemented efficiently, as all that counts at the end of the year is success. The book offers clear planning aids that answer all essential questions to help you achieve a sound marketing plan in seven phases. A competent plan which also enjoys the trust of the company’s growth drivers is a basic requirement for implementing successful campaigns. The content and structure of this book help marketing professionals and relevant areas to shape and optimize the planning process."
––Benno Lohausen, Member of the Management Board, edding AG

"Marketeers are under increased pressure. One reason is novel role models of the customers (see Web 2.0) –they become more and more part of the value creation process –they are also ‘prosumer’, creator and consultants to their peers. Another reason is the never seen before demand for justifying marketing investments, quantifying results and proof of efficiency and effectiveness of any marketing action. This calls for state–of–the–art marketing planning. This book pinpoints an excellent marketing planning approach. Clearly structured and enriched with real world examples and proven tools it is a must–read for any marketer. The structure of marketing planning laid out in this book will also foster to extract further requirements on all applications in the marketing planning arena as well as on information management (e.g. data management or collaborative filtering)."
––Prof Dr Detlef Schoder, Department of Information Systems and Information Management, University of Cologne

"Marketing Planning by Design heralds the big change in marketing to date. Thanks to the Internet and Web 2.0, masses of people outside the boundaries of traditional hierarchies can produce goods, services and content. In order to understand the opportunities this presents for companies as well as to get further clarity on the tangible benefits of marketing, this book is a clear must–read."
––Ralf Klein–Boelting, General Authorized Representative for Corporate Marketing and Communications, Deutsche Bahn AG, Berlin

"Dr Strauss provides much–needed insight for answering that age–old question, how do we measure return on marketing investment? For marketers who care about producing results that matter, one could hardly imagine a more timely and important topic."
––Woodruff W. Driggs, Managing Director – CRM, Accenture, Boston (Mass.)

READ MORE
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
2 of 4

ABOUT THE AUTHOR xiii

PREFACE xv

FOREWORD xvii

INTRODUCTION: THE "LACK–OF–EVIDENCE TRAP" 1

PART I: CHALLENGES TO THE MARKETING FUNCTION: IMPERATIVE FOR CHANGE

1 NEW CHALLENGES IN MARKETING 7

1.1 The challenge: One size doesn′t fit all – quality not quantity 7

1.2 The challenge: CRM – From the buzzword to systematic customer management 11

1.3 The challenge: From the mass market to one–to–one 18

1.3.1 The goals and problems of individualization 18

1.3.2 One–to–one marketing 21

1.3.3 The challenge of mass customization – From individualized marketing to individualized products 25

1.4 The challenge: The changed conditions of marketing strategy 29

1.5 The challenge: Marketing strategy follows corporate strategy ... or vice versa? 34

2 FOCUS ON THE CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER (CMO): A JOB DESCRIPTION 43

2.1 A young profession: A demanding specialized area with C–level caliber 43

2.2 The situation: The discrepancy between expectations and corporate reality 44

2.3 The greatest challenge for heads of marketing: Legitimacy and credibility among colleagues at the management level 45

2.4 The CMO′s new image: Guarantor for "return on marketing" 46

3 PLANNING COMES FIRST ... 49

3.1 Results of the CMO marketing planning survey 49

3.2 "The paradox of the marketing function" and "the 10 hurdles of marketing planning" 55

PART II: THE PATH TO THE PLAN

4 SEVEN PHASES FOR DEVELOPING MARKETING STRATEGY AND SYSTEMATIC MARKETING PLANNING (SEVEN–PHASE MODEL) 59

5 PHASE 1: PLANNING THE PLANNING 65

6 PHASE 2: APPROACHES TO MARKETING BUDGET PLANNING 71

6.1 Heuristic budgeting approach: Pragmatic budget calculation 71

6.2 Analytical budgeting approach: Modeling using the advertising impact function 73

7 PHASE 3: STRATEGIC MARKETING PLANNING 75

7.1 Systematic Procedure for Strategy Development 75

7.2 Analysis of the Initial Strategic Situation 75

7.2.1 Market and Environmental Analysis 75

7.2.2 Competitive analysis: Between cost leadership and differentiation 102

7.2.3 Enterprise analysis: What′s the status quo concerning customers, competitors, and the market as a whole? 104

7.3 Brand management: A brand is a brand 123

7.3.1 The advantages of systematic brand management 123

7.3.2 Brand strategy: How should the brand be positioned on the market? 125

7.3.3 Brand presence: Consistency on the market 133

7.3.4 Brand management on the Internet: Does the customer manage the brand ...? 137

7.4 Sales channel management: Defi ning and designing the sales channel 153

7.4.1 The sales channel: Where is the added value? 153

7.4.2 Managing the sales channel: Recruiting, power, and changes 160

7.4.3 The sales channel: Between cooperation, conflict, and competition 162

7.4.4 Sales channel management on the Internet: The end of the road for the trading partner? 164

7.5 Online marketing: Attractive offerings and pricing wanted 171

7.5.1 The development of a range of Web products and value–added services 171

7.5.2 Price management: Is the price becoming even more decisive? 173

7.6 Developing and evaluating marketing strategies 176

7.6.1 Developing the marketing strategy using key questions ... which basic questions need to be discussed? 176

7.6.2 Key questions about the marketing strategy 176

7.6.3 Selecting a marketing strategy 191

8 PHASE 4: PROGRAM STRATEGY 195

8.1 Decisions about the communication strategy and advertising message 195

8.2 The elements of program planning 204

9 PHASE 5: INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION PLANNING (CAMPAIGN PLANNING) 211

9.1 From programs to campaigns: From content to implementation 211

9.2 Differentiation and standardization of campaign architectures 218

9.3 Using media: How can I reach the customer cost–efficiently? 223

9.4 Advertising effectiveness analysis: Test procedure made easy 226

10 PHASE 6: CAMPAIGN DEVELOPMENT AND EXECUTION 229

10.1 Selecting an agency: A systematic approach to fi nding the

most suitable agency 229

10.2 Good agency briefi ng: The key to success 233

11 PHASE 7: ANALYSIS AND REPORTING 235

11.1 Analysis and reporting: Figure–based planning and learning from success (or failure) 235

11.2 Analysis instruments for efficient planning and implementation 240

11.2.1 Cost accounting and profi tability analysis: Is it worth the effort? 240

11.2.2 Analysis using key fi gures: Less is more 242

11.2.3 Customer lifetime value management 242

11.3 Defining KPIs and controlling with the balanced scorecard 246

PART III: IMPLEMENTATION

12 IMPLEMENTING MARKETING PLANNING 253

12.1 Marketing organization in a state of fl ux 253

12.1.1 Organization and management: Getting the framework right 253

12.1.2 Coordination mechanism: Self–organization and chaos? 263

12.1.3 Procedural model for transforming marketing organization: Market excellence 265

12.2 Gathering and managing customer data (database marketing) 267

12.3 Planning and implementing marketing planning: The secret is in the system 274

12.3.1 CRM system: Requirements and basic structure 274

12.3.2 The need to align IT and marketing strategies 280

12.3.3 Developing an IT strategy 282

PART IV: OUTLOOK

13 MARKETING PLANNING 2.0 287

APPENDIX: WORKSHEETS FOR MARKETING PLANNING 289

A.1 Marketing program: Details (program book) 289

A.2 Agency briefing document (direct marketing example) 295

BIBLIOGRAPHY 303

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 329

TABLE OF FIGURES 331

INDEX 337

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
3 of 4

Loading
LOADING...

4 of 4
Dr
RALF E. STRAUSS has been the Chief Marketing Officer for SAP in Germany and Central Europe since 2003. And, from April 2008 he takes over global product management responsibility for all SAP CRM Marketing solutions, responsible for solution strategy, product vision and roadmap. SAP is the world′s leading provider of business software, with more than 46,100 customers in more than 120 countries running SAP applications – from distinct solutions addressing the needs of small businesses and midsize companies to suite offerings for global organizations.
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
5 of 4
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Adroll
adroll