Powerful Exhibit Marketing. The Complete Guide to Successful Trade Shows, Conferences, and Consumer Shows

  • ID: 2211395
  • Book
  • 302 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Trade shows, consumer shows, product launches, corporate events, professional conferences and other opportunities to interact face–to–face with customers have become an important part of the marketing mix. Well chosen and executed events can shorten the sales cycle significantly and put you miles ahead of the competition, but you need to have an exhibit plan that s well thought out, organized and executed,Powerful Exhibit Marketing provides the step–by–step advice you need to get real results from your exhibits, Learn how to:
  • Set objectives, budget for your event, and measure its success
  • Choose the right show and find the right audience
  • Develop an action plan for working the show
  • Design an attractive, memorable, and effective booth
  • Create promotions and in–booth activities that work
  • Turn leads into business
  • Gather customer information and competitive intelligence
  • Follow up successfully
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Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

What Is Exhibit Management?

PART ONE: MANAGING THE FISCAL RESOURCES.

Chapter 1. Exhibiting Objectives.

Three Levels of Exhibit Objectives.

Get Focused.

Quantify Your Objectives.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 2. Budgeting and Financial Management.

Calculate the Amount of Exhibit Space Required.

The Final Budget.

Financial Management.

Exhibit Annual Report.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 3. Choosing the Right Event.

Understand Your Objectives.

Define Your Audience.

Establish a Customer Profile.

Focus on Your Market.

Rank Your Customer Profiles in Order of Priority.

Where Do You Find Places to Exhibit?

How to Choose the Right Event.

Where to Find Suitable Events.

In Conclusion.

PART TWO: MANAGING THE PHYSICAL ASPECTS.

Chapter 4. Create Your Three–Dimensional Marketing Experience.

Creating the Experience.

Interest.

Memorability.

Connectivity.

Developing Your Display Needs Analysis.

Create a Request for Proposal (RFP).

The Design Schedule.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 5. Your Display the Nuts and Bolts.

System: Custom or Hybrid?

Color.

Lighting.

Flooring.

Signs and Graphics.

Technology.

Booth Configuration.

Layouts.

Height.

Customs and Duty.

Storage.

Emergency Supplies Box.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 6. Enhancements.

Location.

Plants and Flowers.

Hospitality.

Demonstrations.

Collateral Material.

Draws.

In–Booth Activities.

Promotional Products.

Sponsorships.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 7. Pre–Show Promotion.

Invitations.

Public Relations.

Advertising.

Web Announcements.

Other Promotional Ideas.

In Conclusion.

PART THREE: MANAGING THE HUMAN RESOURCES.

Chapter 8. Pre–Show Briefing.

Attendees Behavior.

Booth Staff Personality.

The Third Element: The Type of Training.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 9. The Four Stages of Boothing.

Stage 1. Entry Level.

Stage 2: Better but Still a Long Way to Go.

Stage 3: The First Sign of Real Improvement.

Stage 4: Where Real Results Are Found.

The Skills.

The Six People You Are Likely to Meet at a Trade Show.

Motivate the Doers.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 10. Breaking the Ice.

Do #1: Ask Open Questions.

Do #2: Focus on Business.

Don t #1: Don t Ask a Question If You Don t Want the Answer.

Don t #2: Don t Ask a Question If You Don t Know What to Do with the Answer.

Don t #3: Don t Ask a Question That Leads to a Pitch.

Three Ice–Breaking Scenarios.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 11. Gathering Information.

A = Authority.

C = Capability.

T = Time.

I = Identity.

O = Obstacles.

N = Need.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 12. Making Effective Show Presentations.

Maintain Focus.

Good Time Management Practices.

The Presentation.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 13. Disengaging.

The Presumptive Disengagement.

The Conciliatory Disengagement.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 14. Developing Rapport with Potential Clients.

Words.

Para–Verbal.

Nonverbal.

Prior to Approaching.

Rapport during the Ice Breaker.

Rapport during Information Gathering.

What to Look for.

Maslow′s Hierarchy and the Rapport–Building Process.

Rapport during the Disengagement.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 15. Turning Leads into Business.

Sales Objectives.

Sample Letters.

Continuous Follow–up.

Stay in Touch.

Communication Objectives.

A Guideline for Creating Your Follow–up Plan.

A Note About Privacy.

In Conclusion.

Chapter 16. Gathering Strategic Intelligence at a Show.

Your Strategic Intelligence Team.

Your Strategic Intelligence Plan.

Step 1: Set Up Definitions and Objectives.

Step 2: Do the Research.

Step 3: Assign Responsibilities and Create a Schedule for Your Strategic Intelligence Team.

Step 4: Gathering the Information.

Step 5: Develop the Walking Plan.

Step 6: Strategic Intelligence Overlap.

Step 7: Combat Information Overload.

Step 8: Evaluate Your Results.

In Conclusion.

Index.

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Barry Siskind
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