The 1970s is Here and Now. Architectural Design

  • ID: 2214871
  • Book
  • 128 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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The 1970s is Here and Now.

Guest–edited by Samantha Hardingham

By revisiting work that was published in AD during the 1970′s this issue throws new meaning on both the past and the present; as the 1970s editorial mode of operandus becomes a filter for the contemporary. More of a compendium than a compilation, it is inspired by the broad range its most dynamic and energetic section, Cosmorama.

The 1970s was marked by a seismic change that occurred in the representation of ideas in architecture, as they appeared monthly on the pages of AD. The magazine bore out the energetic, experimental, environmentally conscious and, ultimately, pluralist culture that prevailed throughout the 1960s, carrying it through to the emergence of Postmodernism in the late 1970s. The propositions and discourse recorder by young architects at that time (many of whom are today our most respected teachers and practitioners) were fuelled by the ability to speculate on the availability and exchange of information; through the pages of AD, they were encouraged to imagine global cultures, structures and systems that embraced new technologies – all without the use of personal computers, the Internet and mobile phones.

This issue is guest–edited by Samantha Hardingham, a research fellow at the Research Centre for Experimental Practice (EXP) based in the Department of Architecture at the University of Westminster, and editor of Cedric Price. Opera (Wiley–Academy), 2003. Contributors include. Marie–Ange Brayer, Nic Clear of General Lighting and Power, David Cunningham, Jon Goodbun, Liza Fior of muf, John Frazer, James Madge, Chris Moller of S333, Jon Vincent and Robert Webb.

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Editorial (H. Castle).

Introduction (S. Hardingham).

A Cosmorama of Now (W. McLean).

A Memory of Possibilities (S. Hardingham).

Out–in–the–Open University (N. Lister).

The Agora at Dronten (J. Madge).

Computing Without Computers (J. Frazer).

Planning Tools (C. Moller).

The Info–Urbanisation of China (T. Jachna).

It′s All About Getting What You Want (L. Fior, et al.).

I Love Cad (N. Clear).

On Surrealism and Architecture (J. Goodbun & D. Cunningham).

Sustaining Technology (R. Webb).

Hmmmm Gardening: Some Comments on Garden Style and False Economy (J. Vincent).

Active Narratives (M. Brayer).


Interior Eye: Theatre Underground (C. Kellogg).

Practice Profile: Bevk Perovic arhitekti (V. Croci).

Building Profile: Opera House, Copenhagen (J. Melvin).

Home Run: Soho Court, London (B. Stewart).

Engineering Exegesis: Case Study: Bix (A. Chaszar).

Site Lines: Bubble Bar (H. Watson).

Philip Webb: Pioneer of Arts & Crafts and Architecture (S. Kirk).

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Samantha Hardingham was the successful author that the ellipsis series launched their eponymous grey architectural guides with in the 1990s. Her architecture guide to London has been re–issued in five separate editions most recently by Batsford in 2003. She is also the author ofCedric Price Opera book (Wiley–Academy 2003). She is a research fellow at the School for Architecture and the Built Environment, University of Westminster.
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