The Project Management Institute Project Management Handbook

  • ID: 2217774
  • Book
  • 496 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Driven by recent business trends, project management has grown beyond its roots in engineering and aerospace to transform the service, financial, computer, and general management sectors. Along the way, it has accumulated a standardized body of knowledge that can be used to handle large–scale development projects in any industry. Now, the world′s premier organization for project management assembles that knowledge in one authoritative volume.

With 35,000 members around the globe and its own certification program, the Project Management Institute serves as a clearinghouse for the most up–to–the–minute information in this burgeoning field. Its Project Management Handbook brings together more than twenty–five experts from academia, consulting, and private industry to take a critical look at the state of the art and suggest ways to improve it.

In clear, accessible language these experts provide a comprehensive overview of the technical, organizational, administrative, and interpersonal elements of successful project management. They define the unique aspects of projects and the role they play in organizational success. They detail the essentials of project planning from risk management to resource allocation to scheduling. They describe the team–building, motivational, and conflict–management challenges that project leaders face. And they delineate critical success factors as well as the major pitfalls to avoid.

For beginners hoping to build their knowledge about project management principles, those in mid–career looking to update their understanding of best practices, and seasoned professionals striving to benchmark their progress against standards set by the experts, this essential reference provides practical information on every page.

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The Author.


1. Key Issues in Project Management (Peter W. G. Morris).

2. Strategic Project Management (David Clelend).

3. Managing the Black Boxes of the Project Environment (Rolf A. Lundin & Anders Soderholm).

4. Stakeholder Management (David I. Cleland).

5. Developing Winning Proposals (Joan Knutson).

6. Organizational Structure and Project Management (Robert C. Ford & W. Alan Randolph).


7. Project Scope Management (Jeffery K. Pinto).

8. Methods of Selecting and Evaluating Projects (Dorla A. Evans & William E. Sounder).

9. Project Risk Management (R. Max Widerman).

10. Work Breakdown Structures (Gene R. Simmons & Christopher M. Lucarelli).

11. Network Planning and Scheduling (Jack Gido & James P. Clements).

12. Schedule Control (Jack Gido & James P. Clements).

13. Project Resource Planning (Marie Scotto).

14. Closing Out the Project (J. Davidson Frame).


15. The Project Manager (Barry Z. Posner & James M. Kouzes).

16. Power, Politics, and Project Management (Jeffrey K. Pinto).

17. Team Building (Hans J. Thamhain).

18. Cross–Functional Cooperation (David Wilemon).

19. Project Leadership (David F. Caldwell & Barry Z. Posner).

20. Project Team Motivation (Peg Thoms).

21. Negotiation Skills (John M. Magenau).

22. Conflict Management (Vijay K. Verma).


23. Critical Success Factors (Jeffrey K. Pinto & Dennis P. Slevin).

24. Four Failures in Project Management (Kenneth G. Cooper).

25. The Future of Project Management (Jeffrey K. Pinto).


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JEFFREY K. PINTO is the past editor of the Project Management Institute′s quarterly journal and is the Samuel A. and Elizabeth B. Breene University Endowed Fellow in Management at Penn State Erie/BehrAnd College School of Business.
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