Occupational Outlook for Community College Students. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 146. J–B CC Single Issue Community Colleges

  • ID: 2219922
  • Book
  • 112 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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This volume will assist community college leaders in thinking about the future of their institutions by focusing on the trends in the labor markets most common to community college programming. The editors, both economists, bring that perspective to bear on the forces shaping those markets. Using data specially prepared by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the chapter authors consider the long–run employment projections for clusters of programs in the fields of interest to community college students: health sciences, business, noncredit programs, protective services, and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). A case study of California community colleges and an essay on the changing nature of transfer programs round out the volume.

This is the 146th volume of the Jossey–Bass higher education quarterly report series <a href="[external URL] Directions for Community Colleges. Essential to the professional libraries of presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other leaders in today's open–door institutions, New Directions for Community Colleges provides expert guidance in meeting the challenges of their distinctive and expanding educational mission.
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EDITORS′ NOTES 1Richard M. Romano, Hirschel Kasper

1. The Economics of Community College Labor Markets: A Primer 3Hirschel KasperWith particular reference to the community college, this chapter reviews economic and other factors that influence the demand for labor and its supply.

2. Technological Change, Globalization, and the Community College 11Richard M. Romano, Donald A. DellowThis chapter explores the historical impact of changing technology on the nature of work and skill requirements. Globalization in the form of job outsourcing will create a challenge for certain occupational programs.

3. Help Wanted: Postsecondary Education and Training Required 21Anthony P. Carnevale, Jeff Strohl, Nicole SmithThe authors discuss the connection between credentials and earnings and the importance of postsecondary education as the arbiter of economic opportunity.

4. National Labor Market Projections for Community College Students 33Dixie SommersThis chapter presents specially prepared data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics on the average annual job growth and replacement needs for occupations for which the community college is a significant path of preparation. It explains the BLS′s methodology and the risk associated with these projections.

5. The Outlook in the Health Sciences 53Janell LangBuilding on data presented in Chapter Four, the author addresses the challenges and opportunities for students and colleges in this occupational area.

6. The Outlook in Business and Related Fields 63Robert WalkerThis chapter builds on data presented in Chapter Four and addresses the opportunities for students and colleges in this occupational area.

7. The Outlook in Engineering–Related Technology Fields 69Peggie WeeksThis chapter builds on data presented in Chapter Four and addresses the challenges and opportunities for students and colleges in this occupational area.

8. The Outlook in the Protective Service Fields 77Gregory Talley, Susan KorsgrenThis chapter covers law enforcement, homeland security, and related fields. It builds on data presented in Chapter Four and addresses the opportunities for students and colleges in these occupational areas.

9. The Outlook for Noncredit Workforce Education 87Michelle Van Noy, James JacobsReporting on a study of short–term workforce training covering all states, this chapter discusses funding sources, outcomes, and long–term trends of these noncredit programs.

10. How Well Do Community Colleges Respond to the Occupational Needs of Local Communities? Evidence from California 95Duane E. Leigh, Andrew M. GillUsing large national and statewide databases, the authors examine how well community colleges respond to changing demand by providing occupational training programs that are marketable in their local economy.

11. The Outlook for Transfer Programs and the Direction of the Community College 103Barbara K. TownsendThis chapter discusses the growth of the applied baccalaureate degree at four– and two–year colleges.

INDEX 111

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Richard M. Romano is the director of the Institute for Community College Research at Broome Community College in Binghamton, New York, and a research associate at the Institute for Community Development and the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute at Cornell University.

Hirschel Kasper is professor of economics at Oberlin College.

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