Herbal Medicine. A Practical Guide For Medical Practitioners - Product Image

Herbal Medicine. A Practical Guide For Medical Practitioners

  • ID: 2222044
  • Book
  • 208 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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This is the first chapterbook on herbal medicine for doctors , it will not cover other alternative therapies. The intention of the book is intended to clarify what herbal and other plant therapy has been proven effective and what is wishful remains conjecture.

Information comes from a variety of sources including traditional use, scientific study, folk use and anecdotal accounts. All too often the testimonial approach or pseudo science is used to promote a new trend in herbal prescribing. These approaches do make us sceptical of the whole concept of herbal therapy. We should however remember that many orthodox treatments are of plant origin and that traditional treatment, which has evolved over thousands over yearof years, is likely to have benefit.
With improved and standardized herbal medicine production scientific studies are now being carried out. It is likely that some herbal treatments will be proven effective and adopted into mainstream medicine.

Key features:

Written from a medical viewpoint
Provides scientific background to herbal medicine
Covers diverse medical subjects such as rheumatology, cardiology, dermatology and oncology and many others
Provides much needed information for doctors whose patients may be self prescribing herbal medications
Provides the latest information on evidence based tests
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Introduction.

C H A P T E R 1.

Herbal medicine: past, present.

and future.

Introduction.

Why the change?.

Why the change back?.

What is the evidence?.

Is it safe?.

Is there progress?.

Future developments.

References.

C H A P T E R 2.

Herbal medicine in cardiovascular.

disease.

Introduction.

Heart failure.

Cardiac arrhythmia.

Ischaemic heart disease.

Hypertension.

Diuretics.

Anti–platelet medications.

Anticoagulants.

Peripheral vascular disease.

Toxicity.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 3.

Herbal medicine in metabolic and.

endocrine disease.

Introduction.

Gout.

Diabetes.

Obesity.

Thyroid disorder.

Hyperlipidaemia.

Homocysteine.

Toxicity.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 4.

Herbal medicine in.

gastroenterology.

Introduction.

Dyspepsia.

Motility disorders.

Diarrhoea.

Constipation.

Vomiting.

Peptic ulcers.

Inflammatory bowel disease.

Liver disease.

Toxicity.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 5.

Herbal medicine in obstetrics.

gynaecology.

Introduction.

Menopause.

Menstrual irregularity.

Premenstrual tension.

Amenorrhoea.

Infertility.

Pregnancy.

Morning sickness.

Threatened miscarriage.

Labour.

Post–partum.

Breast feeding.

Toxicity.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 6.

Herbal medicine in neuropsychiatry.

Introduction.

Anxiety/depression.

Migraine.

Schizophrenia.

Analgesia.

Epilepsy.

Dementia.

Multiple sclerosis.

Parkinson s disease.

Stroke.

Tinnitus.

Toxicity.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 7.

Herbal medicine in oncology.

Introduction.

Prophylaxis.

Treatment.

Supportive treatment.

Toxicity.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 8.

Herbal medicine in infectious.

disease.

Introduction.

Fever.

Immune enhancement.

Anti–viral therapy.

Anti–bacterial plants.

Topical therapy.

Anti–protozoal plants.

Anti–helminthic plants.

Toxicity.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 9.

Herbal medicine in respiratory.

disease.

Introduction.

Symptom control.

Bronchitis.

Bronchial asthma.

Toxicity.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 10.

Herbal medicine in rheumatology.

Introduction.

Arthritis.

Rheumatoid arthritis.

Chronic fatigue syndrome.

Osteoporosis.

Gout.

Toxicity.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 11.

Herbal medicine in renal and.

genito–urinary disease.

Introduction.

Prostatism.

Prostate cancer.

Calculi.

Erectile dysfunction.

Bladder infection.

Bladder dysfunction.

Nephritis and renal failure.

Toxicity.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 12.

Herbal medicine in dermatology.

Introduction.

Skin healing.

Skin irritation.

Eczema.

Psoriasis.

Control of infection.

Miscellaneous uses.

Toxicity.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 13.

Adverse effects associated with.

herbal medicine.

Introduction.

Intrinsic reactions.

Toxicity.

Overdosage.

Interaction with pharmaceuticals.

Idiosyncratic reaction.

Extrinsic reactions.

Misidentification and.

substitution.

Lack of standardisation.

Contamination.

Adulteration.

Incorrect preparation and.

storage.

Conclusion.

References.

C H A P T E R 14.

Herbal medicine: does it really.

work?.

Introduction.

Plants with proven benefits.

Cardiovascular medicine.

(Chapter 2).

Hyperlipidaemia (Chapter 3).

Gastrointestinal disease.

(Chapter 4).

Neurology/psychiatry.

(Chapter 6).

Malaria (Chapter 8).

Genito–urinary disease.

(Chapter 11).

Plants with suspected benefits still.

awaiting proof of efficacy.

Metabolic disorders (Chapter 3).

Obstetrics/gynaecology.

(Chapter 5).

Neuropsychiatry (Chapter 6).

Malignancy (Chapter 7).

Infection (Chapter 8).

Arthritis (Chapter 10).

Genito–urinary disease.

(Chapter 11).

Dermatology (Chapter 12).

Conclusion.

References.

A P P E N D I X A.

Suggested reference material.

Books.

Websites.

A P P E N D I X B.

Dosages of important medications.

Index

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Graham Pinn was born in England and educated at Charing Cross Hospital in London. On qualification he joined the Airforce and developed the Travel Bug . He completed his specialist training as a physician whilst in the Airforce and after leaving moved to New Zealand. After some years in a district hospital in New Plymouth the travel bug struck again and he set off around the world. Following stints in the Middle East, Germany, the South Pacific, the Seychelles he settled in Australia and worked for 10years as senior physician at the Nambour Hospital on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland. In his twilight years he has again set off travelling and is now working once more in the Middle East.

The interest in herbal medicine developed during his travels with time in third world environments and exposure to the local treatment options. Traditional treatment has become an increasing interest over the last 15 years, culminating in a series of articles for the Australian General Practitioners Journal. These articles have now been revised and updated as the source of this book.
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