Ruling Distributed Dynamic Worlds. Wiley Series on Parallel and Distributed Computing - Product Image

Ruling Distributed Dynamic Worlds. Wiley Series on Parallel and Distributed Computing

  • ID: 2244605
  • Book
  • 288 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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A powerful new model to design and manage distributed dynamic systems

This text expands and builds upon the author′s landmark work, Mobile Processing in Distributed and Open Environments, by introducing a new extended, universal WAVE–WP (or world processing) model for distributed processing and control in dynamic and open worlds. The new model treats the whole world as a highly parallel and universal spatial machine, driven by a single spatial program in coordinated navigation mode. This new control theory and technology has broad applications for the design and implementation of large–scale distributed control systems, including Internet network management, rapid reaction forces, combat and disaster relief systems, space research, mobile cooperative robots, and artificial intelligence.

With the author′s careful explanations of both the theory and applications, readers discover a new kind of thinking that simplifies how large dynamic systems should be designed, organized, tasked, simulated, and controlled. Following a general introduction, chapters are carefully structured and organized to provide readers with a full understanding of this complex topic and its many practical applications:

  • Worlds and waves in the WAVE–WP model
  • The world processing language
  • Distributed WAVE–WP interpretation in dynamic environments
  • Spatial programming in WAVE–WP
  • Exemplary mission scenarios
  • Distributed management using dynamic infrastructures
  • Crisis management scenarios and systems

Engineers tasked with the responsibility of designing and developing complex distributed dynamic systems will find the WAVE–WP model to be a revolutionary breakthrough in the field and this book to be an essential blueprint.

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Preface.

1. INTRODUCTION.

1.1 Toward Coordination and Management of Large Systems.

1.2 Problems of Managing Large Distributed Systems.

1.3 WAVE–WP: Basic Ideas.

1.4 Example: The Shortest Path Problem.

1.5 Example: Distributed Knowledge Representation and Processing.

1.6 System organization as a function of the application scenario.

1.7 Relation to the Previous Book.

1.8 Comparison with Other Works in Related Areas.

1.9 Organization of the Book.

2. WORLDS AND WAVES IN THE WAVE–WP MODEL.

2.1 Physical World.

2.2 Virtual World.

2.3 United Physical Virtual World.

2.4 Execution World.

2.5 Waves.

2.6 Conclusions.

3. WORLD PROCESSING LANGUAGE.

3.1 Top Language Organization.

3.2 Data Definitions.

3.2.1 General on Constants.

3.2.2 Special Constants.

3.2.3 Vectors.

3.3 Variables.

3.4 Acts.

3.5 Rules.

3.6 Forward Rules.

3.7 Echo Rules.

3.8 Expressions.

3.9 Working with Physical Matter.

3.10 Conclusions.

4. DISTRIBUTED WAVE–WP INTERPRETATION IN DYNAMIC ENVIRONMENTS.

4.1 Doers and Their Networks.

4.2 Wave–WP Interpreter Architecture.

4.3 Track Infrastructure.

4.4 Elementary Operations Involving Multiple Doers.

4.5 More Complex Spatial Operations.

4.6 Other Distributed Interpretation Issues.

4.7 Conclusions.

5. SPATIAL PROGRAMMING IN WAVE–WP.

5.1 Traditional Sequential and Parallel Programming.

5.2 Virtual World Programming.

5.3 Mobility of Doers in Physical World.

5.4 Moving and Acting in Physical World Directly.

5.5 Programming in Integration of Physical and Virtual Worlds.

5.6 Conclusions.

6. EXEMPLARY MISSION SCENARIOS.

6.1 Coordinated Movement of a Group.

6.2 Physical Matter Delivery and Remote Processing.

6.3 Physical World Search Assisted by Virtual World.

6.4 Map–Based Collection of Samples.

6.5 Conclusions.

7. DISTRIBUTED MANAGEMENT USING DYNAMIC INFRASTRUCTURES.

7.1 Distributed Creation and Reconfiguration of an Infrastructure.

7.2 Dynamic Hierarchy Based on Physical Neighborhood.

7.3 Basic Command–and–Control Scenario in WAVE–WP.

7.4 Solving Distributed Management Problems.

7.5 Air Traffic Management in Dynamic Environments.

7.6 Conclusions.

8. MORE CRISIS MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS AND SYSTEMS.

8.1 Region Patrol by Mobile Robots.

8.2 Distributed Dynamic Cognitive Systems.

8.3 Multirobot Hospital Scenarios.

8.4 Future Combat Systems.

8.5 Crises Management in Open Networks.

8.6 Using Global Infrastructures in WAVE–WP.

8.7 Conclusions.

9. CONCLUSIONS.

9.1 Summary of the Main Features of WAVE–WP.

9.2 Some Main Application Areas.

9.3 Final Remarks.

9.4 Future Plans.

APPENDIX: WAVE–WP SUMMARY.

A.1 Extended Language Syntax.

A.2 Compact Syntax Description.

A.3 Permitted Abbreviations.

References.

Index.

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PETER S. SAPATY, PhD, is Director of Distributed Simulation and Control, Institute of Mathematical Machines and Systems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. He also worked in Germany, UK, Canada, and Japan as project leader and research professor, and is currently a visiting professor at the University of Aizu in Japan.
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