Development Economics

  • ID: 2246481
  • Book
  • 312 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Development Economics is aimed at the upper level undergraduate, graduate marketing for economic development and international trade courses. Almost every school offers the course each semester and the only prerequisite is introductory economics (so this is not a heavy duty research course). The total market in the US is estimated around 40,000 students per year with an average of 45 students per class.

Development Economics offers several competitive advantages that will easily set it apart. Firstly, it is more analytical than the competition which reviewers think will capture the upper level of the market which happens to be where the larger enrolments are. Secondly, it will contain the most comprehensive citations of recent literature, a major weakness with the competition. Thirdly, it has an abundance of Japanese examples which provide a global distinction. Finally, the reviewers felt that it was well written and ready to go as it is.

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1. Growth and Development: Some Views.

Historical Theories of Development.

The Classic Theory.

Keynesian Growth Models.

The Neoclassical Model.

The New Growth Economics.

Conclusion.

Notes.

2. A Unifying Theme.

Rationality: Individual Choice.

Rationality: Household Choice.

Extensions of Rationality: A Sociology of Choice.

Limitations of Rationality.

The Development Process.

Conclusion.

Notes.

3. The Traditional Sector and Development.

The Traditional Sector.

Market Integration and Transaction Costs.

Development by Displacement.

Traditional Sector Development.

Historical Illustrations.

Land Tenancy.

Technological Change.

Traditional Sector: Manufacturing.

Distorted Development.

Conclusion.

Notes.

4. Fertility and Population.

Malthus and Malthusianism.

Transition Theory.

Endogenous Population Growth Models (Neo–Malthusian).

Economic Theories.

Proximate Determinants Approaches.

Morality.

Conclusion.

Appendix.

Notes.

5. Labor.

Unemployment.

Migration.

Efficiency Wage Models.

Appropriate Technique and Appropriate Technology.

Education.

Conclusion.

Notes.

6. Public Economics.

Welfare Economics and Consumer Surplus.

Shadow Prices: Valuing Outputs and Inputs.

Cost–Benefit Analysis.

Public Revenues.

Conclusion.

Notes.

7. International Trade.

Traditional Perspective.

Protectionist Arguments.

Results of Import Substitution.

Conclusion.

Notes.

8. The State.

Concerning Market Imperfections.

Protecting Ruling Coalitions.

Fostering Development and Institutional Change.

Conclusion.

Notes.

Index.

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Roger J. Grabowski
Michael P. Shields
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