NAPA Bulletin. Methodology for Research Anthropology and Fisheries Management in the United States. Number 28

  • ID: 2249073
  • Book
  • Region: United States
  • 168 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Applied fisheries anthropology continues to grow while making substantial contributions to the understanding of fisheries management in the United States. It has become increasingly clear that fisheries can no longer be productively managed solely on the basis of biological and ecological criteria. Cultures and communities of all those who are involved in fisheries must be taken into account to manage the marine ecosystem in a sustainable manner. The 11 chapters in this anthology discuss various social science contributions dealing with federal and state efforts in managing fisheries.

Using ethnographic examples from various parts of the United States, the volume presents a diverse set of research methods for studying fisheries, including traditional fieldwork, survey methodology, cultural modeling, participatory research, and quantitative indicators–based assessment. This compilation suggests that differences in methodology are due in part to the nature and location of the communities, time and funding allotted to each study, as well as the type of fisheries being studied.

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Anthropology and Fisheries Management in the United States Palma Ingles, Jennifer Sepez, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 1 13.

Influencing Fisheries Management: Multitasking for Maximum Effectiveness John R. Maiolo, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 14 26.

Defining Fishing Communities: Issues in Theory and Practice Patricia M. Clay, Julia Olson, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 27 42.

A Quantitative Model for Ranking and Selecting Communities Most Involved in Commercial Fisheries Jennifer Sepez, Karma Norman, Ron Felthoven, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 43 56.

Social Indicators and Measurements of Vulnerability for Gulf Coast Fishing Communities Michael Jepson, Steve Jacob, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 57 68.

Any Port in the Storm: The Effects of Hurricane Katrina on Two Fishing Communities in Louisiana Palma Ingles, Heather McIlvaine–Newsad, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 69 86.

Filipino Crew Community in the Hawaii – Based Longline Fishing Fleet Stewart Allen, Amy Gough, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 87 98.

A State–Managed Program for Conducting Interviews with Commercial Fishermen Brian Cheuvront, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 99 108.

Life on the Water: A Historical–Cultural Model of African American Fishermen on the Georgia Coast (USA) Ben G. Blount, Kathi R. Kitner, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 109 122.

Cultural Models and Cultural Consensus of Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab and Oyster Fisheries Michael Paolisso, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 123 135.

Using Oral History Techniques in A NOAA Fisheries Service (NMFS) Education and Outreach Project: Preserving Local Fisheries Knowledge, Linking Generations, and Improving Environmental Literacy Susan Abbott–Jamieson, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 136 147.

The Community Panels Project: Citizens′ Groups for Social Science Research and Monitoring Madeleine Hall–Arber, National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 148 162.

Biosketches of Authors National Association for the Practice of Anthropology Bulletin Sep 2007, Vol. 28, No. 1: 163 166.

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Volume Editors: Palma Ingles and Jennifer Sepez

General Editors: Satish Kedia and Tim Wallace

Palma Ingles has been an anthropologist with NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service since 2002 working for the Southeast Regional Office in St. Petersburg, Florida. She conducts community research and monitors research done by others for NMFS in the Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic, and the Caribbean. She has conducted extensive research in the Gulf of Mexico since 2002. During the last year she has been working on research pertaining to the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on communities in the gulf. Before starting work for the Southeast, she did contract work in Alaska with the NMFS, Alaska Fisheries Science Center. Dr. Ingles also holds degrees in photography and was a photographer for ten years at the University of Florida. She received her masters and Ph.D. in cultural and applied anthropology in 2000 from the University of Florida where her dissertation work focused on indigenous tribes in the Amazon that live a subsistence lifestyle growing crops and fishing and working with tourism. Her leisure time is spent traveling, scuba diving, kayaking, and doing photography. (Palma.Ingles@noaa.gov)

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