+353-1-416-8900REST OF WORLD
+44-20-3973-8888REST OF WORLD
1-917-300-0470EAST COAST U.S
1-800-526-8630U.S. (TOLL FREE)

PRINTER FRIENDLY

Personal Persistence, Identity Development, and Suicide. A Study of Native and Non-Native North American Adolescents. Edition No. 1. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development

  • ID: 2249755
  • Book
  • September 2003
  • Region: North America, United States
  • 156 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
This Monograph demonstrates that disruptions to young people's developing conceptions of personal or cultural persistence begin to explain the suicide rates among Aboriginal Canadian and non-Aboriginal Canadian youth.
  • Presents a developmental and cross-cultural investigation into suicide among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadian youth.
  • Links disruptions to developing conceptions of personal or cultural persistence with suicide rates
  • Finds, through a series of normative studies, that Aboriginal Canadian and non-Aboriginal Canadian youth ordinarily follow distinctive pathways of identity development.
  • Demonstrates that those who fail to own their personal past, and their as yet unrealized future, are at especially heightened risk of suicide, while those who live in communities making an effort to reclaim their cultural past, and to direct the future course of their civic lives, are at dramatically lower risk of suicide.
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Part I: Contents:.

Abstract.

1. Introduction.

2. The Antimony of Sameness and Change.

3. On Self-Continuity and its Developmental Vicissitudes-What Young People Have to Say about the Paradox of Sameness and Change.

4. Self-Continuity and Youth Suicide.

5. From Self-Continuity to Cultural Continuity-Aboriginal Youth Suicide.

6. Culture as a Set Point in the Choice between Narrativist and Essentialist Self-Continuity Warranting Practices.

7. Conclusions.

8. Appendix: Sample Questions from the Personal Persistence Interview.

Part II: Commentary:.

9. Treading Fearlessly: A Commentary on Personal Persistence, Identity Development, and Suicide: James E. Marcia (Simon Fraser University).

Contributors.

Statement of Editorial Policy

Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Michael Chandler University of British Columbia.

Christopher Lalonde University of Victoria, Canada.

Bryan W. Sokol assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Simon Fraser University, Canada.

Darcy Hallett University of British Columbia.
Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown
Adroll
adroll