Recovered Memories. Seeking the Middle Ground

  • ID: 2250033
  • Book
  • 292 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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When a person recovers a memory of an event from their past for which they claim little or no previous awareness, how reliable is that memory?

In this refreshing new approach to the problem, Graham Davies and Tim Dalgleish have assembled leading figures from both sides of the debate to provide a balanced overview of the evidence from theoretical and clinical psychologists.

Recovered Memories: Seeking the Middle Ground, unlike most other writing on the topic, eschews extreme positions. It provides clinicians with findings from the latest research to enhance their understanding of memory and presents pure researchers with a range of experiences encountered in clinical practice for which they presently have few explanations.

Organised around three themes, social, evidential and clinical aspects are covered. Topics include the impact on family and community members, the latest findings on implanted memories and discussion of clinical guidelines for therapeutic practice.

This important new collection should not be missed by anyone with an interest in memory, whether engaged in a clinical, legal, child protection, family welfare or experimental research capacity. It is the most authoritative and comprehensive review of the evidence on both sides available to date.
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About the Editors.

About the Contributors.

Introduction.

THE SOCIAL ASPECTS.

Socio–historical Perspective (T. Dalgleish & N. Morant).

Recovered Memories: Effects Upon the Family and Community (G. Gudjonsson).

Recovered Memories of Abuse: Effects on the Individual (A. Skinner).

Recovered Memories: The Legal Dilemmas (E. Magner & P. Parkinson).

EVIDENTIAL ASPECTS.

The Recovered Memories Controversy: Where Do We Go From Here? (D. Lindsay & J. Read).

Discovering Fact and Fiction: Case–based Analyses of Authentic and Fabricated Discovered Memories of Abuse (K. Shobe & J. Schooler).

Is It Possible to Discriminate True From False Memories? (G. Davies).

CLINICAL ASPECTS.

Therapeutic Techniques, Therapeutic Contexts and Memory (D. Bekerian & M. O′Neill).

Recovered Memories in Therapy Clinicians′ Beliefs and Practices (B. Andrews).

Establishing Practice–based Guidelines for Therapists (N. Robertson).

Psychogenic Amnesias: Functional Memory Loss (M. Kopelman & J. Morton).

CONCLUDING COMMENTS.

Memories of Abuse and Alien Abduction: Close Encounters of a Therapeutic Kind (M. Power).

Author Index.

Subject Index.
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" a valuable contribution to the area " (The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice, December 2002)
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