Uiq 3. The Complete Guide. Symbian Press

  • ID: 2250568
  • Book
  • 696 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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UIQ3 is a major tool to help programmers grasp the new features in UIQ3, and also to explain and simplify the processes necessary when porting from UIQ2 to UIQ3, and from other platforms.

After a brief introduction and history of UIQ, the book explains the key new features of UIQ3. The SDK is introduced and the reader is taken from a simple ′Hello World′ program through the application components of UIQ using helpful examples. Additional functionality such as Comms is covered as well as optimisation, deployment and signing. The book progresses on to portray porting, covering UIQ2, Series 60, Windows Mobile and Palm OS. Necessary steps will be explained and examples used to provide a worked example from each source environment.

UIQ3 provides a single comprehensive resource, which will enable programmers to get up to speed and working on the platform quickly.
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Foreword: Peter Molin, Chief Technology Officer, UIQ Technology ix

Foreword: Mats Blomberg, Manager, Software Strategy, Sony Ericsson CTO Office xi

About the Authors xiii

About this Book xvii

Acknowledgements xxiii

1 Background 1

1.1 A Little History 1

1.2 About UIQ Technology 1

1.3 Overview of UIQ 3 3

1.4 UIQ 3 Application Suite 5

1.5 Technologies and Features in the UIQ Platform 6

1.6 UIQ 3 Development Platform 8

1.7 UIQ Ecosystem 9

2 UIQ3Basics 13

2.1 UI Configuration 13

2.2 Building Blocks and Layout Manager 26

2.3 Command Processing Framework 29

2.4 UIQ 3 Operational Model 37

2.5 View Layout Construction 38

2.6 Changes Between UIQ 2.1 and UIQ 3 41

2.7 Changes Between UIQ 3.0 and UIQ 3.1 46

2.8 UIQ 3.2 47

3 Quick Start 51

3.1 Introduction 51

3.2 The Development Environment 52

3.3 The QuickStart Example 56

3.4 Building from the Command Line 61

3.5 Running on the Emulator 62

3.6 Packaging for the Phone 65

3.7 Using Carbide.c++ 66

4 Symbian OS Essentials 69

4.1 What this Chapter Covers 69

4.2 Symbian OS Versions 69

4.3 Symbian OS Code Conventions 71

4.4 Symbian OS Class Types 74

4.5 Leaves and the Cleanup Stack 78

4.6 Panics, Assertions and Leaves Compared 90

4.7 Construction and Destruction 93

4.8 Descriptors: Symbian OS Strings 97

4.9 Arrays 113

4.10 Templates 119

4.11 Active Objects and Threads 121

4.13 System Information 138

4.14 Platform Security 141

4.15 Acknowledgements 146

5 Understanding User Interface Components 147

5.1 Controls and Windows 147

5.2 The Control Environment 152

5.3 Views and the View Server 157

5.4 Anatomy of the Screen 159

6 List Boxes 169

6.1 ListView1 Application 169

6.2 ListView2 Application 181

7 Commands and Categories 197

7.1 Commands Overview 197

7.2 Commands1 Example Application 199

7.3 Categories 224

7.4 Further Information 231

8 Layout Managers and Building Blocks 233

8.1 Layout Managers 233

8.2 Building Blocks 236

9 Views and Dialogs 251

9.1 Overview 251

9.2 Working with Views 253

9.3 Dialogs in UIQ 266

10 Building an Application 275

10.1 Symbian Signed 275

10.2 Starting Our Project: SignedAppPhase1 278

10.3 SignedAppPhase2 292

10.4 Building your Application for Deployment 335

11 Multimedia 341

11.1 SignedAppPhase3 341

11.2 Symbian Signed Requirements 343

11.3 Images 344

11.4 Alternative Image Support: CQikContent 355

11.5 Camera 358

11.6 Multimedia Framework (MMF) 369

11.7 Audio 369

11.8 Video 378

11.9 Tuner API 383

12 Communications 389

12.1 Communications Technologies 389

12.2 Symbian OS Communications Architecture 396

12.3 Sockets 398

12.4 Bluetooth Technology 407

12.5 HyperText Transfer Protocol 422

12.6 Messaging Architecture 431

12.7 The Send As Interface 447

12.8 Telephony 448

13 Refining Your Application 451

13.1 Localization of Application Languages 451

13.2 Internationalization 461

13.3 Application Performance 463

13.4 Other Considerations 475

14 Symbian Signed 479

14.1 Symbian Signed Options 480

14.2 Further Considerations 480

14.3 Application Origin 481

14.4 Capabilities 482

14.5 Routes to Symbian Sign an Application 489

14.6 Procedural Impact 497

14.7 Getting Started with Symbian Signed 497

14.8 Submission and Compliance Criteria 500

14.9 Symbian Signed Test Criteria 501

14.10 Lessons Learned 512

15 Testing, Debugging and Deploying 517

15.1 Back to Basics 517

15.2 An Example of Bad Behavior 519

15.3 Testing 519

15.4 Debugging 538

15.5 Deploying 545

15.6 Summary 550

16 Porting Applications 553

16.1 Where to Start 554

16.2 The Aims of Porting 555

16.3 General Porting Considerations 556

16.4 General Porting Techniques 565

16.5 Porting from a Standard C/POSIX Environment 568

16.6 Porting from Palm OS and Windows Mobile 570

16.7 Porting from S60 3rd Edition 590

16.8 Summary 612

References and Resources 613

Glossary 617

Index 631

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Mark Wright (editor) joined Ericsson in 1997 and took a key role in defining the functional and user interface specifications for "Communicator" class products. When Symbian was formed, Mark was seconded to the ′Quartz′ team as Project Manager and managed the functional specification and definition of the GUI.
Mark has extensive experience in communicating between different teams, notably Marketing and Development. He has provided third party support and written detailed White Papers for the Sony Ericsson P800 smartphone and Sony Ericsson′s range of 2G, 3G and WLANPC Cards.

John Holloway is the CEO of ZingMagic Limited, a mobile games developer and publisher, and the Director of Client Software Applications at Mobrio Ltd, an online social networking and user generated content services company. John is one of the most experienced mobile software architects in the world, with over 22 years in the arena.  John commenced his career with a ten–year spell at Psion where he contributed significantly to the body of software code that now lies at the heart of Symbian OS.  He was the founder of Purple Software and his role as CTO culminated in the company being awarded the first ever BAFTA for a mobile computer game in 2002.

Matthew Hunt joined Sony Ericsson in and worked to establish and build the Enterprise & Partner Support Team, which is responsible for providing Sony Ericsson, Symbian and UIQ technical and development support to software suppliers who are delivering software or services for Sony Ericsson Smartphones.

Simon Judge is a freelance Mobile Developer and has worked in mobile for over 11 years and IT for over 20 years. After working at Vodafone and Oracle, Simon has been responsible for many Symbian projects for companies including Pixology, Boots, Jessops and Philips Research. More recently Sony Ericsson commissioned Simon to write UIQ tutorials for Sony Ericsson Developer World.  He has also worked at Symbian in the Java team.

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