Wireless and Mobile Data Networks

  • ID: 2326511
  • Book
  • 376 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Connecting to the Future of Wireless Data Technologies

Presenting complex subjects without getting into advanced mathematics, Wireless and Mobile Data Networks gives students and professionals a comprehensive overview of major wireless network architectures and standards.

The opening chapters introduce wireless data network types, architectures, and wireless local area network (WLAN) components. The author follows with physical and medium access control layers of WLANs, mobile IP, and session initiation protocol (SIP); then expands on other relevant topics, such as wide area wireless data networks, security in wireless data networks, routing in ad hoc network, and wireless personal area networks (WPAN); followed by the wireless metropolitan area networks (MANs).

This up–to–the–minute and in–depth coverage of how key standards and protocols work includes:

  • Wireless LAN architectures, such as IEEE 802.11
  • Wireless PAN architectures, such as Bluetooth (IEEE 802.15.1), IEEE 802.15.3/3a (high data rate and UWB–based PANs), and IEEE 802.15.4 (low power, low data rate PANs)
  • Wireless broadband access, such as IEEE 802.16/16a
  • Comparisons between architectures, such as IEEE Wireless MANs (IEEE 802.16 and 802.16a) compared to the European Union approaches (HIPERACCESS and HIPERMAN)
  • 3G cellular standards, including CDMA2000® and W–CDMA
  • Ad hoc networks
  • Security in wireless data networks

Wireless and Mobile Data Networks is both an up–to–date reference for IT professionals and a comprehensive textbook for advanced communications and computer science students.

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PREFACE.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.

1. WIRELESS DATA—INTRODUCTION.

1.1. Wireless Voice.

1.2. Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs).

1.3. Wide Area Cellular Networks.

1.4. Fixed Wireless Networks.

1.5. Personal Area Networks.

1.6. Satellite–Based Data Networks.

1.7. Mobile IP.

1.8. The Wireless Spectrum.

2. REFERENCE ARCHITECTURES FOR WIRELESS DATA NETWORKS.

2.1. Bluetooth.

2.2. IEEE 802.11.

2.3. HIPERLAN/2.

2.4. Broadband Wireless Access Networks.

2.5. Cellular Data Networks.

2.6. Summary.

3. COMPONENTS OF A WIRELESS LAN.

3.1. Local Area Networks (LANs).

3.2. Wireless LAN Components.

4. WLANs: THE PHYSICAL LAYER.

4.1. IEEE 802.11 Standards Suite.

4.2. Interference Rejection Using Barker Sequence, OFDM and CCK.

4.3. HIPERLAN PHY.

4.4. Summary.

5. WLANs: MEDIUM ACCESS CONTROL.

5.1. IEEE 802.11 Medium Access Control.

5.2. IEEE 802.11e factor.

5.3. Routing and Mobility Support.

5.4. MAC Layer Management.

5.5. MAC Frames.

5.6. Multicasting Capability.

5.7. HIPERLAN MAC.

5.8. HIPERLAN 2.

5.9. User and Data Privacy.

5.10. Power Management.

5.11. Multimedia Services.

5.12. Routing.

5.13. Mobility Support.

5.14. MAC Frame.

5.15. Teleconferencing Capability.

5.16. Data Link Control (DLC) Layer.

6. MOBILITY AND INTERNET PROTOCOLS.

6.1. Mobility in Internet Applications.

6.2. Internet Protocols for Mobility.

6.3. Session Initiation Protocol (SIP).

6.4. Mobile IP.

6.5. Mobility Management in an Access Network.

6.6. Cellular IP.

6.7. IPv6 and Mobility Management.

7. DATA COMMUNICATIONS IN CELLULAR NETWORKS: CDMA2000.

7.1. Business Wireless Data Networks.

7.2. Cellular Data Networks.

7.3. Release D for cdma2000 Based Access.

7.4. cdma2000 Standard.

7.5. cdma2000 Medium Access Control.

7.6. All–IP Architecture.

7.7. Summary.

8. DATA COMMUNICATIONS IN CELLULAR NETWORKS: W–CDMA.

8.1. Components of the UMTS Network.

8.2. UMTS Network Domains.

8.3. Strata.

8.4. Radio Access Network (RAN).

8.5. UMTS Services.

8.6. Improvements Over Release 99.

8.7. IMS System Concepts.

8.8. Session Layer Architecture.

8.9. Open Service Access (OSA).

8.10. Parlay.

8.11. IPv4/IPv6 Scenarios Towards All–IP Infrastructure.

8.12. 3GPP Release 6 Objectives.

8.13. Summary.

9. SECURITY IN WIRELESS DATA NETWORKS.

9.1. Ascribing Security to a Network.

9.2. Security Network Architecture.

9.3. Secure Operating System (SOS).

9.4. Components of Security System.

9.5. Wireline Equivalent Privacy (WEP).

9.6. Wi–Fi Protected Access (WPA).

9.7. IEEE 802.11i.

9.8. Security in Cellular Networks.

9.9. Final Word.

10. ROUTING IN WIRELESS LANs.

10.1. Routing in Infrastructure Networks.

10.2. Ad Hoc Wireless Networks.

10.3. Characteristics of a Good Routing Protocol.

10.4. Classifications of Routing Protocols.

10.5. Routing Phases.

10.6. Routing Mechanisms.

10.7. Performance Comparison.

10.8. Multicasting.

10.9. Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) Protocol.

10.10. Selecting the Best Route.

10.11. WLAN Routing Through Cellular Network Infrastructure.

10.12. Routing in Personal Area Networks.

10.13. Summary.

11. WIRELESS PERSONAL AREA NETWORKS AND ULTRAWIDE BAND COMMUNICATIONS.

11.1. Wireless Personal Area Networks (WPANs).

11.2. Terminology for WPANs.

11.3. IEEE 802.15.1 Standard.

11.4. Higher Data Rate PANs (IEEE 802.15.3).

11.5. Ultra Wideband (UWB) Spectrum.

11.6. Low Data Rate WPANs (LR–WPANs) and IEEE 802.15.4.

11.7. Summary.

12. BROADBAND WIRELESS ACCESS (BWA).

12.1. Line–of–Site (LoS) and Non–Line–of–Site (NLoS) Systems.7

12.2. Effect of Antenna Type.

12.3. BWA Spectrum.

12.4. BRAN versus WirelessMAN.

12.5. IEEE WirelessMAN.

12.6. IEEE 802.20 Mobile Broadband Wireless Access (MBWA).

12.7. Cellular and Satellite Networks as Wireless Local Loops (WLL)s.

APPENDIX: OVERVIEW AND GUIDE TO THE IEEE 802 LMSC.

INDEX.

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Aftab Ahmad
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