Hydrogen as a Future Energy Carrier

  • ID: 2326645
  • Book
  • 441 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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The world′s output of irretrievable greenhouse gases as well as hazardous waste resulting from current methods of energy generation needs to be significantly reduced in the interest of avoiding environmental, meteorological and economic disasters. One widely acknowledged strategy is the use of hydrogen as a carbon–free source of energy instead of burning fossil fuels.

This monograph fills the gap for concise but comprehensive literature on this interdisciplinary topic, involving as it does chemical, physical, biological and engineering challenges. It provides broad coverage of the most important fields of modern hydrogen technology: hydrogen properties, production, storage, conversion to power, and applications in materials science. In so doing, the book covers all the pertinent materials classes: metal hydrides, inorganic porous solids, organic materials, and nanotubes. The authors present the entire view from fundamental research to viable devices and systems, including the latest scientific results and discoveries, practical approaches to design and engineering, as well as functioning prototypes and advanced systems.
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INTRODUCTION

HISTORY OF HYDROGEN

Timeline of the History of Hydrogen

The Hindenburg and Challenger Disasters

HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

Fossil Fuels

The Carbon Cycle and Biomass Energy

The Hydrogen Cycle

PROPERTIES OF HYDROGEN

Hydrogen Gas

Interaction of Hydrogen with Solid Surfaces

Catalysis of Hydrogen Dissociation and Recombination

The Four States of Hydrogen and their Characteristics and Properties

Surface Engineering of Hydrides

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

Hydrogen Production from Coal and Hydrocarbons

Electrolysis: Hydrogen Production from Electricity

HYDROGEN STORAGE

Hydrogen Storage in Molecular Form

Hydrogen Adsorption (Carbon, Zeolites, Nanocubes)

Metal Hydrides

Complex Transition Metal Hydrides

Tetrahydroborates as a Non–transition Metal Hydrides

Complex Hydrides

Storage in Organic Hydrides

Indirect Hydrogen Storage via Metals and Complexes Using Exhaust Water

HYDROGEN FUNCTIONALIZED MATERIALS

Magnetic Heterostructures: A Playground for Hydrogen

Optical Properties of Metal–Hydrides: Switchable Mirrors

APPLICATIONS

Fuel Cells using Hydrogen

Borohydride Fuel Cells

Internal Combustion Engine

Space Applications with Hydrogen
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Andreas Züttel
Andreas Borgschulte
Louis Schlapbach
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