Corrosion Resistance of Steels Against Inorganic Acids

  • ID: 2329851
  • Book
  • 682 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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Steel is one of the most widely used construction materials with more than 1.3 billion tons produced each year. Buildings, industrial plants, machines, tools, pipelines, vessels and tanks are only a few of its applications in our daily life. Steel is an alloy made of iron and additional elements like carbon, chromium, manganese, vanadium and tungsten, and its quality, ductility, hardness and strength vary with the amount of the alloying element.

As steels corrode in various atmospheres, in water and in soil its corrosion resistance against the four most common chemicals and inorganic acids – hydrochloric, nitric, sulfuric and phosphoric acid as well as against mixed acids is essential and a crucial financial factor for many industries. These acids are present in nearly every industrial production process such as metal manufacturing but also explosives, food, dyes, leather, paper and fertilizers, to name only a few.

Understanding how to strengthen the corrosion resistance of steels as reaction, transport and storage devices against these omnipresent and aggressive acids is key for all industries involved. This book is therefore a must–have for all mechanical, civil and chemical engineers, material scientists and chemists working with steel or acidic media.

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PREFACE

HOW TO USE THE HANDBOOK

WARRANTY DISCLAIMER

HYDROCHLORIC ACID

Unalloyed and low–alloyed steels/cast steel

Unalloyed and low–alloy cast iron

High–alloy cast iron

Austenitic cast iron (and others)

Ferritic chromium steels with < 13 % Cr

Ferritic chromium steels with>=13 % Cr

Ferritic/perlitic–martensitic steels

Ferritic–austenitic steels/duplex steels

Austenitic CrNi steels

Austenitic CrNiMo (N) and CrNiMoCu (N) steels

Special iron–based alloys

Bibliography

MIXED ACIDS

Unalloyed and low alloy steels/cast steel

Unalloyed cast iron and low–alloy cast iron

High–alloy cast iron

Ferritic chromium steels with < 13 % Cr

Ferritic chromium steels with>= 13 % Cr

Ferritic–austenitic steels/duplex steels

Austenitic CrNi steels

Phosphoric and hydrochloric acid

Austenitic CrNiMo (N) and CrNiMoCu (N) steels

Austenitic CrNiMoCu (N) steels

Bibliography

NITRIC ACID

Unalloyed steels and cast steel

Unalloyed cast iron

High–alloy cast iron

High–silicon cast iron

Structural steels with up to 12 % chromium

Ferritic chromium steels with more than 12 % chromium

Ferritic–austenitic steels with more than 12 % chromium

Austenitic chromium–nickel steels

Austenitic chromium–nickel–molybdenum steels

Austenitic chromium–nickel steels with special alloying additions

Special iron–based alloys

Bibliography

Phosphoric Acid

Unalloyed steels and cast steel

Unalloyed cast iron

High–alloy cast iron

High–silicon cast iron

Structural steels with up to 12 % chromium

Ferritic chromium steels with more than 12 % chromium

Ferritic–austenitic steels with more than 12 % chromium

Austenitic CrNi steels

Austenitic CrNiMo (N) steels

Austenitic chromium–nickel steels with special alloying additions

Special iron–based alloys

Bibliography

SULFURIC ACID

Unalloyed steels and cast steel

Unalloyed cast iron

High–alloy cast iron

High–silicon cast iron

Structural steels with up to 12 % chromium

Ferritic chromium steels with more than 12 % chromium

Ferritic–austenitic steels with more than 12 % chromium

Austenitic chromium–nickel steels

Austenitic chromium–nickel–molybdenum steels

Austenitic chromium–nickel steel with special alloying additions

Special iron–based alloys

Bibliography

KEY TO MATERIALS COMPOSITIONS

INDEX OF MATERIALS

SUBJECT INDEX
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It should not be missed in the shelves of technicians, engineers and scientists dealing with those materials or their applications.   (Materials and Corrosion, 1 December 2013

The book Corrosion Resistance of Steel against Inorganic Acid , edited by Michael Schutze, Thomas Ladwein, and Roman Bender, Wiley–VCH, is therefore a must–have for all mechanical, civil and chemical engineers, material scientists and chemists working with steel or acidic media.   (LaborPraxis, 1 December 2012)

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