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Energy Efficiency

  • ID: 2484198
  • Book
  • September 2003
  • 640 Pages
  • Elsevier Science and Technology
Energy Efficiency: Towards the End of Demand Growth is a detailed guide to new energy efficiency technologies and policy frameworks affecting the profitability of efficiency projects. The contributions drawn together by F.P. Sioshansi feature insights from recognized thought leaders, detailed examinations of evolving technologies, and practical case studies yielding best practices for project planners, implementers and financiers. This volume challenges the "more is better" paradigm in energy production, examining efficiency technologies and measurement across the supply chain.
  • Comparative financial analysis of efficiency vs. increased generation
  • Case studies from four continents highlight the examples of successful technologies and projects
  • Explains how existing and developing regulatory frameworks  impact cost and implementation
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Foreword   Preface

Introduction

Part I: End of demand growth is within reach

Chapter 1 Will energy efficiency make a difference?

Chapter 2 Utility energy efficiency programs: Lessons from the past, opportunities for the future

Chapter 3 A global perspective on the long-term impact of increased energy efficiency

Chapter 4 Carpe Diem
Why retail electricity pricing must change now Allan Schurr, Global Energy & Utilities, IBM and Steven Hauser, New West Technologies

Chapter 5 Is there an energy efficiency gap?

Part II: The
frustratingly slow
evolution of energy efficiency

Chapter 6 Making cost-effective energy efficiency fit utility business models: Why has it taken so long?

Chapter 7 The evolution of demand side management in the US

Chapter 8 China: Energy efficiency where it really matters

Chapter 9 Rapid growth at what cost? Impact of energy efficiency policies in developing economies

Part III: Case studies of low energy projects, policies & communities

Chapter 10 The prospect of zero net energy buildings in the US   Chapter 11 What if this actually works? Implementing California's zero net energy goals

Chapter 12 Zero net energy at a community scale: UC Davis West Village

Chapter 13 Crouching demand, hidden peaks: What's driving electricity consumption in Sydney?

Chapter 14 From consumer to prosumer: Netherland's PowerMatchingCity shows the way

Chapter 15 Back to basics: Enhancing efficiency of electricity generation and delivery

Chapter 16 Smarter Demand Response in RTO Markets: The Evolution Toward Price Responsive Demand in PJM

Part IV: Opportunities and remaining obstacles

Chapter 17 Shifting demand: From the economic imperative of energy efficiency to business models that engage and empower consumers

Chapter 18 What comes after the low-hanging fruit?

Chapter 19 Energy convergence: Integrating increased efficiency with increased penetration of renewable generation   Chapter 20 Energy efficiency finance: a Silver bullet amid the buckshot?

Chapter 21 The holy grail: Customer response to energy information

Chapter 22 Trading in energy efficiency
a market based solution, or just another market failure?

Chapter 23 The ultimate challenge: Getting consumers engaged in energy efficiency

Epilogue
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Sioshansi, Fereidoon
Fereidoon Sioshansi is President of Menlo Energy Economics, a consulting firm focused on the rapid transformation of the electric power sector. He is the editor and publisher of EEnergy Informer, a monthly newsletter with international circulation. His professional experience includes working at Southern California Edison Co. (SCE), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), NERA, and Global Energy Decisions. Since 2006, he has edited 13 books published by Academic Press; the latest, Variable generation, flexible demand, was published in 2021
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