Sociologies of Moderation. Sociological Review Monographs

  • ID: 2708547
  • Book
  • 228 Pages
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
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In an age seemingly characterized by polarizing culture wars, political and religious extremism, and increasing economic and social inequities, just what is the definition of 'moderation' these days? And what might a reasoned contemporary programme of moderation look like intellectually, politically, and in practice? Despite its importance to public policy debates, the field of sociology has been surprisingly reticent in its coverage of the concept of moderation in recent years. Sociologies of Moderation corrects this oversight through a series of original papers that probe the sociological origins, intellectual foundations, and contemporary relevance of moderation in 21st–century politics, religion, and society. Featuring contributions from top sociologists, social theorists, and emerging scholars working in the US, Great Britain, and beyond, the papers in this special supplement of The Sociological Review collectively argue for a sociological reappraisal of the intellectual foundations and contemporary salience of moderation. Drawing in part on the American pragmatist tradition, and backed by the latest cutting–edge empirical evidence, their findings suggest that moderation is better grasped as a disciplined engagement with deeply divided publics in a variety of socio–cultural contexts.

Thought–provoking and timely, Sociologies of Moderation provides a wealth of enlightening insights into what the pursuit of moderation would look like in our increasingly immoderate world.
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Preface and acknowledgements

 Series editor s introduction (Chris Shilling)

1. Sociologies of moderation (Alexander Thomas T. Smith and John Holmwood)

2. Plundering the commons: the growth imperative in neoliberal times (Robert J. Antonio)

3. Moderation impossible? On hype, honesty and trust in the context of modern academic life (Brigitte Nerlich)

4. Blurred visions: experts, evidence and the promotion of moderate drinking (Henry Yeomans)

5. Restoring social creativity to immoderate publics: the case of the financially incontinent citizen (Jeff Vass)

6. Feminist radicality and moderation in times of crises and change (Srila Roy)

7. Democracy begins at home: moderation and the promise of salvage ethnography (Alexander Thomas T. Smith)

8. Pride and prejudice: gay rights and religious moderation in Belfast (Jennifer Curtis)

9. The blogosphere and its enemies: the case of oophorectomy (Stephen Turner)

10. Rethinking moderation in a pragmatist frame (John Holmwood)

11. Epilogue: The moderation of rhetoric (Rt Revd Nicholas Baines)

Notes on contributors

Index
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As an academic who intersects both the humanities and social sciences I found the breadth of topics covered brought this volume to life in a way that was both accessible and thought provoking.  As an academic who intersects both the humanities and social sciences I found the breadth of topics covered brought this volume to life in a way that was both accessible and thought provoking.   (The Sociological Review, 3 June 2014)
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