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Advances in Delay-tolerant Networks (DTNs). Woodhead Publishing Series in Electronic and Optical Materials

  • ID: 2936184
  • Book
  • November 2014
  • Region: Global
  • 298 Pages
  • Elsevier Science and Technology
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Part one looks at delay-tolerant network architectures and platforms including DTN for satellite communications and deep-space communications, underwater networks, networks in developing countries, vehicular networks and emergency communications. Part two covers delay-tolerant network routing, including issues such as congestion control, naming, addressing and interoperability. Part three explores services and applications in delay-tolerant networks, such as web browsing, social networking and data streaming. Part four discusses enhancing the performance, reliability, privacy and security of delay-tolerant networks. Chapters cover resource sharing, simulation and modeling and testbeds.

- Reviews the different types of DTN and shows how they can be applied in satellite and deep-space communications, vehicular and underwater communications, and during large-scale disasters- Considers the potential for rapid selection and dissemination of urgent messages is considered- Reviews the breadth of areas in which DTN is already providing solutions and the prospects for its wider adoption

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  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Electronic and Optical Materials
  • Preface
  • 1: An introduction to delay and disruption-tolerant networks (DTNs)
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 Delay-tolerant network architecture
    • 1.3 DTN application scenarios
    • 1.4 DTN routing protocols
    • 1.5 Conclusion
    • Acknowledgements
  • Part One: Types of delay-tolerant networks (DTNs)
    • 2: Delay-tolerant networks (DTNs) for satellite communications
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 DTN architecture
      • 2.3 Geosynchronous (GEO) constellations
      • 2.4 Low earth orbit (LEO) constellations
      • 2.5 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgements
    • 3: Delay-tolerant networks (DTNs) for deep-space communications
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Data communications in deep space
      • 3.3 Networking requirements for deep-space data
      • 3.4 Implementing a deep-space DTN solution
      • 3.5 Summary
    • 4: Vehicular delay-tolerant networks (VDTNs)
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Vehicular network applications
      • 4.3 Vehicular communications
      • 4.4 Vehicular delay-tolerant networks
      • 4.5 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
    • 5: Delay-tolerant networks (DTNs) for underwater communications
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Related work
      • 5.3 A contemporary view of underwater delay-tolerant networks
      • 5.4 Future trends
      • 5.5 Conclusion
    • 6: Delay-tolerant networks (DTNs) for emergency communications
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Overview of proposed DTN solutions
      • 6.3 Mobility models for emergency DTNs
      • 6.4 DistressNet
      • 6.5 Routing protocols for emergency DTNs
      • 6.6 Minimizing energy consumption in emergency DTNs
      • 6.7 Conclusions and future trends
  • Part Two: Improving the performance of delay-tolerant networks (DTNs)
    • 7: Assessing the Bundle Protocol (BP) and alternative approaches to data bundling in delay-tolerant networks (DTNs)
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 DTN architecture and Bundle Protocol implementation profiles
      • 7.3 Alternative approaches
      • 7.4 Future trends
      • 7.5 Sources of further information and advice
    • 8: Opportunistic routing in mobile ad hoc delay-tolerant networks (DTNs)
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Challenges
      • 8.3 Overview of multiple existing opportunistic routing protocols in mobile ad hoc networks
      • 8.4 Combining on-demand opportunistic routing protocols
      • 8.5 Open research topics and future trends
      • 8.6 Sources of further information and advice
    • 9: Reliable data streaming over delay-tolerant networks (DTNs)
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Challenges for streaming support in DTNs
      • 9.3 Using on-the-fly coding to enable robust DTN streaming
      • 9.4 Evaluation of existing streaming proposals over a DTN network
      • 9.5 Implementation discussion
      • 9.6 Conclusion
    • 10: Rapid selection and dissemination of urgent messages over delay-tolerant networks (DTNs)
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 One-to-many communication in resource-constrained environments
      • 10.3 Random Walk Gossip (RWG)
      • 10.4 RWG and message differentiation
      • 10.5 Evaluation with vehicular mobility models
      • 10.6 Discussion
    • 11: Using social network analysis (SNA) to design socially aware network solutions in delay-tolerant networks (DTNs)
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Social characteristics of DTNs
      • 11.3 Social-based human mobility models
      • 11.4 Socially aware data forwarding in DTNs
      • 11.5 Conclusion
    • 12: Performance issues and design choices in delay-tolerant network (DTN) algorithms and protocols
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Performance metrics
      • 12.3 Processing overhead
      • 12.4 The curse of copying
        I/O performance matters
      • 12.5 Throughput
      • 12.6 Latency and queuing
      • 12.7 Discovery latency and energy issues
      • 12.8 Conclusions
    • 13: The quest for a killer app for delay-tolerant networks (DTNs)
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 The quest for a problem
      • 13.3 DTN as an enabling technology
      • 13.4 Conclusions and future trends
      • 13.5 Sources of further information and advice
  • Index
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Rodrigues, Joel J.P.C.
Joel J. P. C. Rodrigues is a professor at the Federal University of Piauí, Brazil, and senior researcher at the Instituto de Telecomunicações, Portugal. He is the leader of the Next Generation Networks and Applications (NetGNA) research group (CNPq), an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer, Member Representative of the IEEE Communications Society on the IEEE Biometrics Council, and the President of the scientific council at ParkUrbis - Covilhã Science and Technology Park. He has been general chair and TPC Chair of many international conferences, including IEEE ICC, IEEE GLOBECOM, IEEE HEALTHCOM, and IEEE LatinCom. He has authored or coauthored over 800 papers in refereed international journals and conferences, 3 books, 2 patents, and 1 ITU-T Recommendation. He had been awarded several Outstanding Leadership and Outstanding Service Awards by IEEE Communications Society and several best papers awards. Prof. Rodrigues is a member of the Internet Society, a senior member ACM, and Fellow of IEEE.
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